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Keyword: universe

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  • Planet Found With Comet-like Tail

    07/21/2010 5:56:31 AM PDT · by NYer · 12 replies
    Nat Geo ^ | July 15, 2010
    HD 209458b, shown in red in an artist's conception, is the first confirmed "cometary planet," experts say. Image courtesy G. Bacon, NASA/ESAAn alien planet orbits so close to its star that its atmosphere is being blasted away, forming a gaseous, comet-like tail, astronomers announced Thursday. (Related: "Odd Star Sheds Comet-like Tail.") About 153 light-years from Earth, planet HD 209458b hugs its star so tightly that the planet's atmosphere is likely a scorching 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,093 degrees Celsius) an a year passes in just 3.5 days—making Mercury's 88-day orbit seem downright leisurely.That tight orbit also means this gas giant—meaning...
  • The Destiny of the Universe

    07/17/2010 4:54:59 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies · 3+ views
    FQXI ^ | 7/2/10 | Julie Rehmeyer
    A radical reformulation of quantum mechanics suggests that the universe has a set destiny and its pre-existing fate reaches back in time to influence the past. It could explain the origin of life, dark energy and solve other cosmic conundrums.The universe has a destiny—and this set fate could be reaching backwards in time and combining with influences from the past to shape the present. It’s a mind-bending claim, but some cosmologists now believe that a radical reformulation of quantum mechanics in which the future can affect the past could solve some of the universe’s biggest mysteries, including how life arose....
  • Scientists discover explanation for why the Universe exists

    06/01/2010 12:39:32 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 135 replies · 2,433+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 05/20/2010 | Michael Bolen
    Physicists have long wondered why the universe exists when matter and anti-matter particles obliterate each other on contact. But new data from a particle accelerator in the United States suggests a reason. The tests showed that when anti-protons and protons collide, the resulting new particles show a one per cent skew toward matter over anti-matter. Over a long period of time, this characteristic of the universe could explain why matter has come to dominate over anti-matter. "Many of us felt goose bumps when we saw the result," said Stefan Soldner-Rembold, a physicist at the University of Manchester in the United...
  • Living in Obama's Loony Parallel Universe

    05/26/2010 9:29:48 AM PDT · by Nachum · 8 replies · 658+ views
    american thinker ^ | 5/26/10 | Kelcy Allen
    According to my psychoanalyst, I have issues. She believes our nation's dichotomous political climate and divisive political dialogue is affecting my mental state and I'm beginning to show a "disconnect." It's disconcerting to confess that you're coming unhinged -- to admit you're losing touch with reality and are living in some loony parallel universe. Just this month, famed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking expressed his belief that humans are capable of time travel. No kidding. Welcome to my world. My therapist says my anger issues are revealing, but it's not a personality disorder that's got me. It's not an addictive disorder because...
  • Every Black Hole Contains Another Universe?

    04/14/2010 1:44:56 PM PDT · by NYer · 54 replies · 1,713+ views
    Nat Geo ^ | April 9, 2010 | Ker Than
    A supermassive black hole sits inside the galaxy Centaurus A, seen in an artist's conception. Like part of a cosmic Russian doll, our universe may be nested inside a black hole that is itself part of a larger universe.In turn, all the black holes found so far in our universe—from the microscopic to the supermassive—may be doorways into alternate realities.According to a mind-bending new theory, a black hole is actually a tunnel between universes—a type of wormhole. The matter the black hole attracts doesn't collapse into a single point, as has been predicted, but rather gushes out a "white hole"...
  • Large Hadron Atom Smasher Reaches Near Speed of Light

    03/31/2010 12:41:00 AM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 90 replies · 1,565+ views
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | 3/30/2010 | The Daily Galaxy
    Scientists celebrated at the world's biggest atom smasher at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva on Tuesday as they started colliding particles at record energy levels mimicking conditions close to the Big Bang, opening a new era in the quest for the secrets of the universe. The European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said it had unleashed the unprecedented bursts of energy on the third attempt, as beams of protons thrust around the 27-kilometre (16.8-mile) accelerator collided at close to the speed of light. "This is physics in the making, the beginning of a new era, we...
  • Fine Tuning and the Intellectual Necessity (Does Multiverse explain why this universe is special?)

    03/16/2010 7:23:50 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 3 replies · 251+ views
    Darwin's God ^ | 03/15/2010 | Cornelius Hunter
    You have probably heard about the multiverse--the idea that the universe is really a large number of universes. The multiverse helps to explain why our particular universe seems so special. Our universe seems to be a finely tuned machine and the evolution of life would require low probability events. Is our universe special? The multiverse helps to deflect such thinking. If there is a large number of universes, then perhaps each has a different set of natural laws. And perhaps intelligent life can only be supported by a very particular set of laws. So the only life forms that would...
  • Big Bang experiment may reveal dark universe: CERN

    03/08/2010 12:53:11 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 43 replies · 268+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 3/8/10 | Robert Evans
    GENEVA (Reuters) – Dark matter, which scientists believe makes up 25 percent of the universe but whose existence has never been proven, could be detected by the giant particle collider at CERN, the research center's head said Monday. Rolf-Dieter Heuer told a news conference some evidence for the matter may emerge even in the shorter term from mega-power particle collisions aimed at recreating conditions at the "Big Bang" birth of the universe some 13.7 billion years ago. "We don't know what dark matter is," said Heuer, Director-General of the European Organization for Nuclear Research on the Swiss-French border near Geneva....
  • Scientists Re-Create High Temperatures From Big Bang

    02/16/2010 1:36:08 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 79 replies · 1,189+ views
    ABC News ^ | 2/16/2010 | Dan Vergano
    Atom smashers at a U.S. national lab have produced temperatures not seen since the Big Bang — 7.2 trillion degrees, or 250,000 times hotter than the sun's interior — in work re-creating the universe's first microseconds. The results come from the 2.4-mile-wide Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven (N.Y.) National Laboratory. Since 2000, scientists there have hurtled gold atoms together at nearly the speed of light. These smash-ups heat bubbles smaller than the center of an atom to about 40 times hotter than the center of an imploding supernova. Scientists say the results have given them...
  • The Creator

    02/08/2010 7:53:00 PM PST · by Ken4TA · 15 replies · 350+ views
    When a Russian Cosmonaut returned from a space flight he said that he hadn’t seen God out there. An American Astronaut, one who was a Christian, was once asked if he had met God while in space. He answered with full confidence, “I would have, if I had taken off my space suit.” These are not just two contradictory answers to the same question. They are two totally different understandings of the word God and what is meant by it. The Russian Cosmonaut, an atheist, could not believe God existed unless he saw him with his own eyes. Whereas the...
  • Planet-hunting telescope unearths hot mysteries...

    01/05/2010 11:31:15 AM PST · by TaraP · 10 replies · 568+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | Jan 5th, 2010
    WASHINGTON – NASA's new planet-hunting telescope has found two mystery objects that are too hot to be planets and too small to be stars. The Kepler Telescope, launched in March, discovered the two new heavenly bodies, each circling its own star. Telescope chief scientist Bill Borucki of NASA said the objects are thousands of degrees hotter than the stars they circle. That means they probably aren't planets. They are bigger and hotter than planets in our solar system, including dwarf planets. "The universe keeps making strange things stranger than we can think of in our imagination," said Jon Morse, head...
  • Hubble peers back 13.2 billion years, finds 'primordial' galaxies

    01/05/2010 7:27:14 PM PST · by OldDeckHand · 14 replies · 908+ views
    CNN.com ^ | 01/05/10 | Staff
    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has reached back 13.2 billion years -- farther than ever before in time and space -- to reveal a "primordial population" of galaxies never seen before. "The deeper Hubble looks into space, the farther back in time it looks, because light takes billions of years to cross the observable universe," the Space Telescope Science Institute said in a statement released Tuesday. "This makes Hubble a powerful 'time machine' that allows astronomers to see galaxies as they were 13 billion years ago -- just 600 million to 800 million years after the Big Bang," the institute said...
  • Video: Simulation Renders Entire Known Universe (Woah!)

    12/18/2009 8:11:16 PM PST · by SMCC1 · 12 replies · 892+ views
    PopSci ^ | 12/17/2009 | PopSci
    "Everyone loves a good road movie, whether it's Hope and Crosby or Fonda and Hopper. But the scope of those films pales in comparison to the ground covered by the Hayden Planetarium's new video, The Known Universe. The video starts in Tibet and zooms out through time and space until it shows well, the entire known universe. The video, created for the new Rubin Art Museum exhibit Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, uses over a decade of data collected by researchers at the planetarium. Called the Digital Universe Atlas, the data encompasses the...
  • Looking for Life in the Multiverse

    12/18/2009 12:07:14 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 35 replies · 1,339+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 01/01/2010 | Alejandro Jenkins and Gilad Perez
    The typical Hollywood action hero skirts death for a living. Time and again, scores of bad guys shoot at him from multiple directions but miss by a hair. Cars explode just a fraction of a second too late for the fireball to catch him before he finds cover. And friends come to the rescue just before a villain’s knife slits his throat. If any one of those things happened just a little differently, the hero would be hasta la vista, baby. Yet even if we have not seen the movie before, something tells us that he will make it to...
  • Why Evolutionary-Based Science Is A Menace To Scientific Research, Discovery, and Progress

    11/06/2009 9:39:16 AM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 70 replies · 2,422+ views
    Why Evolutionary-Based Science Is A Menace To Scientific Research, Discovery, and Progress Evolutionary-based research always begins with the inaccurate and unscientific presupposition that the Theory of Evolution, i.e. the Big Bang, the spontaneous generation of life, and common descent, is true. Due to this systemic problem, scientific discovery and progress is severely hampered, not to mention the hundreds of millions of research dollars that are squandered every year. In a time in which almost ANY alternative thought is given a platform, the evolution industry is silencing dissenting scientific evidence, even when it’s from fellow evolutionists! See the growing list of...
  • Huge Galaxy Cluster Hints at Universe's Skeleton

    11/03/2009 9:19:57 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies · 824+ views
    Space.com ^ | 11/3/09
    A gigantic, previously unknown set of galaxies has been found in the distant universe, shedding light on the underlying skeleton of the cosmos. "Matter is not distributed uniformly in the universe," said Masayuki Tanaka, an astronomer with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) who helped discover the galactic assemblage. "In our cosmic vicinity, stars form in galaxies and galaxies usually form groups and clusters of galaxies." But those collections of matter are just small potatoes compared to larger structures long-theorized to exist. "The most widely accepted cosmological theories predict that matter also clumps on a larger scale in the so-called 'cosmic...
  • Stargate Unniverse musings.

    10/30/2009 10:02:22 PM PDT · by DGHoodini · 16 replies · 910+ views
    SG Universe show | 10/31/09 | DGHoodini
    Is it just me, or is anyioone else getting the feeling like the next new characters we'll be seeing on the show, will be Yorgi and his sheep? (extra points if you get the reference.)
  • Non-Gravitational Fifth Force? Research Could Change Most Widely Held Scientific Theories...

    10/28/2009 1:26:53 AM PDT · by bogusname · 25 replies · 1,122+ views
    BCN ^ | Oct 28, 2009 | Teresa Neumann
    He [Jesus] is before all things, and in Him all things hold together." -Col. 1:17 REPORTER'S NOTE: Though I'm taking a stab in the dark (excuse the pun) with interpreting this article, one thing is certain: these scientists seem to ascribe cognizant, rational attributes to an invisible "force" that is "ruling over" dark matter in the universe. I'll let you read the article and come to your own conclusions! -Teresa Neumann, BCN. Science Daily reports that an international team of astronomers have found an unexpected link between mysterious 'dark matter' and the visible stars and gas in galaxies that could...
  • Giant Backward Ring Found Around Saturn

    10/08/2009 9:54:25 AM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 27 replies · 2,394+ views
    CEH ^ | October 7, 2009
    Oct 7, 2009 — Saturn has a newly-discovered ring to add to its decor – the largest of all. It’s so big, it makes Saturn look like a speck in the middle of it. The ring, located at the orbit of the small outer moon Phoebe, is inclined 27 degrees and revolves backwards around Saturn. This was announced today by...
  • Reminder: Stargate Universe

    09/30/2009 10:27:55 PM PDT · by DGHoodini · 8 replies · 545+ views
    Online Guide | DGHodini
    Just a reminder for Stargate fans: SyFy Channel will premier 'Stargate Universe' on this Friday, Oct 2nd, at 9pm EDT, followed by an immediate rebroadcast at 12am Oct 3rd.
  • The Non-Expanding Universe

    09/07/2009 9:40:54 AM PDT · by BGHater · 22 replies · 1,226+ views
    FQXi ^ | 25 Aug 2009 | Kate Becker
    Time doesn’t exist. The universe isn’t really expanding. And if you want a theory of quantum gravity, look to the man who inspired Einstein, says Julian Barbour. For someone who believes time doesn’t exist, Julian Barbour sure has a head for dates. He remembers exactly when he started to have doubts about time: It was October 18, 1963, and he was reading the newspaper. He spotted an article about the physicist Paul Dirac and his quest for a theory of quantum gravity—a theory linking Einstein’s ideas about gravity to the clashing doctrine of quantum mechanics. Today, Barbour is on that...
  • Is Earth AGAIN The Center of The Universe?

    09/03/2009 8:13:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies · 1,387+ views
    Christian Post ^ | 9/3/2009 | Allen J. Epling
    I came across a news item in the USA Today website, dated August 18, that got my attention. It concerns "Dark Energy", the mysterious force that seems to be speeding up the expansion of the universe, that no one can find or explain. Two scientists say is doesn't exist now because of a "mathematical solution they have produced, that suggests it is a natural result of the Big Bang. Part of the article is reproduced here. "What's the answer? It doesn't exist, suggest mathematicians Blake Temple and Joel Smoller, in a study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National...
  • Miss Universe national costume event in the Bahamas (Photos)

    08/11/2009 6:37:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 24 replies · 2,670+ views
    Daily Telegraph ^ | August 11, 2009 | By Staff
    Miss Canada Mariana Valente Contestants from 84 countries have come together in the Bahamas to compete for the title of Miss Universe
  • How to map the multiverse (We don’t need to prove fine tuning. It’s just there)

    07/14/2009 6:09:21 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 24 replies · 912+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 5/4/2009 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    BRIAN GREENE spent a good part of the last decade extolling the virtues of string theory. He dreamed that one day it would provide physicists with a theory of everything that would describe our universe - ours and ours alone. His bestselling book The Elegant Universe eloquently captured the quest for this ultimate theory. "But the fly in the ointment was that string theory allowed for, in principle, many universes," says Greene, who is a theoretical physicist at Columbia University in New York. In other words, string theory seems equally capable of describing universes very different from ours. Greene hoped...
  • The self-made universe (Paul Davis tries to explain the fine-tuned universe without God)

    06/20/2009 10:04:17 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 49 replies · 1,455+ views
    MSNBC ^ | 6/20/2009
    Why does the universe seem so fine-tuned for the emergence of life – including intelligent life capable of asking that “why” question? Believers simply say that God did it, while scientists are trying to come up with complicated extradimensional multiverse theories to explain our lucky break. Theoretical physicist Paul Davies takes a completely different tack in a new book titled "Cosmic Jackpot." He argues that the cosmos has made itself the way it is, stretching backward in time to the very beginning to focus in on “bio-friendliness.” Davies admits that the idea has theological overtones - but that's nothing new...
  • Discovering a more precise age of the universe

    06/13/2009 12:04:51 PM PDT · by OldNavyVet · 37 replies · 1,069+ views
    Los Angeles Times ^ | June 13, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
    Wendy Freedman, director of the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, and two colleagues were named this month as recipients of the $500,000 Gruber Prize, one of the world's top awards in the field of cosmology. The Freedman team's work helped scientists to arrive at the currently accepted age of the universe: 13.7 billion years.
  • 'We Are Definitely not Alone in the Universe'

    06/12/2009 11:21:09 AM PDT · by Schnucki · 80 replies · 1,880+ views
    Der Spiegel (Germany) ^ | June 12, 2009
    Mankind has been searching for intelligent life in the universe for decades. One of the leaders of that search is Frank Drake. In an interview with SPIEGEL ONLINE, he said that daytime television might be the aliens' first taste of life on earth. That, he says, "is scary." SPIEGEL ONLINE: Mr. Drake, after searching for decades, no extraterrestrial signal has yet been found. Are we alone in the universe? Drake: We are definitely not alone. At the same time, I think it will be very hard to find the extraterrestrials. If they are only slightly more advanced than we are,...
  • Math theories may hold clues to origin, future of life in universe

    06/09/2009 10:01:50 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 34 replies · 1,081+ views
    physorg ^ | June 9th, 2009
    Math theories may hold clues to origin, future of life in universe June 9th, 2009 How did we get here and where are we headed? These are some of life's biggest questions. To get the answers, one Kansas State University professor is doing the math. Louis Crane, K-State professor of mathematics, is studying new theories about why the universe is the way it is. He has a grant from the Foundational Questions Institute to study new approaches to the quantum theory of gravity, his primary research area as both a mathematician and a physicist. Crane hopes to uncover implications of...
  • Science

    05/10/2009 9:17:22 PM PDT · by stolinsky · 1 replies · 319+ views
    www.stolinsky.com ^ | 05-11-09 | stolinsky
    Will we be exploring the planets and stars that our ancestors gazed at in wonder? Will we be fulfilling our destiny, which I believe is to come as close as we can − with our imperfect minds − to understanding God’s creation? Or will we remain on Earth, our feet stuck in the mud, held back by our constant struggle against barbarians who want to take us all back to the Dark Ages?
  • Darwin--Unwittingly a "Creationist"

    04/19/2009 8:00:09 AM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 25 replies · 726+ views
    Answers Magazine ^ | Jason Lisle, Ph.D.
    Evolutionists often attempt to use observational science—arguments from biology, paleontology, geology, or even astronomy—to support their belief. But the really interesting thing is that they base all their arguments on principles that ultimately come from biblical creation! As strange as it may sound, evolutionists must unwittingly assume that creation is true in order to argue against it. That means that Darwin was (in a sense) a “creationist.” All evolutionists must borrow the principles of biblical creation in order to do science (even though they would deny this). Here is why...
  • A Darwinist Religious Experience Described

    04/13/2009 8:35:28 AM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 8 replies · 755+ views
    CEH ^ | April 11, 2009
    A Darwinist Religious Experience Described April 11, 2009 — As millions of Jews just completed Passover, and as millions of Christians gather to celebrate Easter, a Darwinist reporter was experiencing “existential vertigo” – a sweeping sense of dizziness as her imagination zoomed in and out of the implications of her faith. It may be the closest thing that a secular materialist can call a religious experience. And religious experience is an accurate description: it was the outworking of an all-encompassing world view, with ultimate causes, ultimate destinies, moral imperatives, and heavy doses of faith. Amanda Gefter (see her previous attack...
  • One Hundred Billion Trillion Habitable Planets

    02/17/2009 12:15:35 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 53 replies · 932+ views
    Alan Boss, whose new book The Crowded Universe will soon be on my shelves (and reviewed here), has driven the extrasolar planet story to the top of the news with a single statement. Speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting in Chicago, Boss (Carnegie Institution, Washington) said that the number of Earth-like planets in the universe might be the same as the number of stars, a figure he pegged at one hundred billion trillion. A universe teeming with life? Inevitably. The Telegraph quoted Boss on the matter in an early report on his presentation: “If...
  • A talk with Mario Livio ("Is reality, in some fundamental way, mathematics?")

    02/08/2009 12:09:12 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 9 replies · 544+ views
    Boston.com ^ | 2/8/09 | Carolyn Y. Johnson
    Is mathematics the language of the universe?MARIO LIVIO IS an astrophysicist, a man whose work and worldview are inextricably intertwined with mathematics. Like most scientists, he depends on math and an underlying faith in its incredible power to explain the universe. But over the years, he has been nagged by a bewildering thought. Scientific progress, in everything from economics to neurobiology to physics, depends on math's ability. But what is math? Why should its abstract concepts be so uncannily good at explaining reality? The question may seem irrelevant. As long as math works, why not just go with it? But...
  • Our world may be a giant hologram

    01/18/2009 4:47:55 PM PST · by Crimson Elephant · 54 replies · 2,350+ views
    New Scientist ^ | January 15th, 2009 | Marcus Chown
    DRIVING through the countryside south of Hanover, it would be easy to miss the GEO600 experiment. From the outside, it doesn't look much: in the corner of a field stands an assortment of boxy temporary buildings, from which two long trenches emerge, at a right angle to each other, covered with corrugated iron. Underneath the metal sheets, however, lies a detector that stretches for 600 metres. For the past seven years, this German set-up has been looking for gravitational waves - ripples in space-time thrown off by super-dense astronomical objects such as neutron stars and black holes. GEO600 has not...
  • And They Think Some of Us Are Weird

    12/04/2008 5:02:31 AM PST · by PurpleMountains · 24 replies · 803+ views
    From Sea to Shining Sea ^ | 12/4/08 | Purple Mountains
    A priceless scene appears in the movie, “Expelled”, when Ben Stein asks the leading proponent of Darwinism and atheism, Richard Dawkins, how life began. After sputtering for a few moments, Dawkins offers the thought that some advanced creature from outer space may have seeded life on earth, exposing the fact that Darwinists, who have an answer for everything, have no answer for this most basic question. Now that we know that every key relationship in the universe is based on six numbers (see note 1), that these relationships are crucial to life, and that there would be no life and...
  • Pope says no to chaos, points to God as author of universe

    10/31/2008 1:46:20 PM PDT · by NYer · 9 replies · 413+ views
    CNA ^ | October 31, 2008
    Vatican City, Oct 31, 2008 / 12:56 pm (CNA).- On Friday, the first of a four day meeting held by the Pontifical Academy of Sciences on the topic of evolution, Pope Benedict drew a hard line against those who say that God did not create the universe. Pope Benedict’s 15 minute-long speech to the academics was packed with theological reflection and insight into the issues that the scientific and academic communities must grapple with to come to a fuller understanding of the universe. The Holy Father began his talk by pointing out that both Pius XII and John Paul II...
  • Mapping the universe at 30 Terabytes a night

    10/04/2008 12:32:15 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies · 608+ views
    Register ^ | 3rd October 2008 19:15 GMT | Matt Stephens •
    Jeff Kantor, on building and managing a 150 Petabyte databaseInterview It makes for one heck of a project mission statement. Explore the nature of dark matter, chart the Solar System in exhaustive detail, discover and analyze rare objects such as neutron stars and black hole binaries, and map out the structure of the Galaxy. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is, in the words of Jeff Kantor, LSST data management project manager, "a proposed ground-based 6.7 meter effective diameter (8.4 meter primary mirror), 10 square-degree-field telescope that will provide digital imaging of faint astronomical objects across the entire sky, night...
  • New findings reveal that the shape of the Universe is a Dodecahedron based on Phi

    09/28/2008 12:26:40 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 52 replies · 1,445+ views
    The standard model of cosmology predicts that the universe is infinite and flat. However, cosmologists in France and the US are now suggesting that space could be finite and shaped like a dodecahedron instead. They claim that a universe with the same shape as the twelve-sided polygon can explain measurements of the cosmic microwave background – the radiation left over from the big bang – that spaces with more mundane shapes cannot.Power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Data from WMAP have extended the accuracy of the spectrum far beyond what was known from earlier measurements. This plot...
  • The Multiverse: Big Bangs Without End

    09/23/2008 3:14:32 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies · 484+ views
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 9/18/08 | Dan Falk
    Three different trends in physics each suggest that our universe is just one of many.We usually think of the universe as being “everything there is.” But many astronomers and physicists now suspect that the universe we observe is just a small part of an unbelievably larger and richer cosmic structure, often called the “multiverse.” This mind-bending notion – that our universe may be just one of many, perhaps an infinite number, of real, physical universes – was front and center at a three-day conference entitled "A Debate in Cosmology — The Multiverse," held at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics...
  • Monster galactic cluster seen in deep Universe: European agency

    08/25/2008 3:56:31 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 15 replies · 307+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 8/25/08 | AFP
    PARIS (AFP) – An orbiting observatory has spotted a massive cluster of galaxies in deep space that can only be explained by the exotic phenomenon known as dark energy, the European Space Agency (ESA) said on Monday. Spotted in a scan by ESA's orbiting X-ray telescope XMM-Newton, the cluster's mass is about 1,000 times that of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, it said. The huge cluster, known by its catalogue number of 2XMM J083026+524133, lies 7.7 billion light years from Earth and helps confirm the existence of dark energy, the agency said. Under this hypothesis, most of the Universe...
  • Deïsm, Agnosticism, and Atheism

    07/10/2008 4:42:12 AM PDT · by Apollo 13 · 12 replies · 151+ views
    July 10, 2008 | Apollo 13
    Hi folks - I myself often battled innerly with how I stand in things religious. I studied the Bible in its entirety very carefully, and did a lot of other reading (e.g. about the ancient Greek and Roman view on religion). I do have respect for people who take the agnostic stance - if you don't have gone through religious experiences, and your conscience tells you so, then it is absolutely respectable to say: 'I don't know' (the great philosopher Imanuel Kant, himself a devout religious man, wrote this almost literally). My own view on this topic: I have great...
  • Is Ice a Catalyst for Life Throughout the Universe?

    06/23/2008 1:33:10 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 12 replies · 177+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 6/23/08
    Ancient_antarctic_microbes_2_2 The unusual properties of frozen water may have been the ticket that made life possible. Over the decades, several notable scientists have began to suspect that life on Earth did not evolve in a warm primordial soup, but in ice—at temperatures that few living things can now tolerate. The very laws of chemistry may have actually favored ice, says Jeffrey Bada, at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. “We’ve been arguing for a long time,” he says, “that cold conditions make much more sense, chemically, than warm conditions.” If Bada and others are correct, it would...
  • Dark, Perhaps Forever (Is the theory of everything unattainable?)

    06/04/2008 11:07:19 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 88 replies · 202+ views
    New York Times ^ | 6/3/08 | Dennis Overbye
    BALTIMORE — Mario Livio tossed his car keys in the air. They rose ever more slowly, paused, shining, at the top of their arc, and then in accordance with everything our Galilean ape brains have ever learned to expect, crashed back down into his hand. That was the whole problem, explained Dr. Livio, a theorist at the Space Telescope Science Institute here on the Johns Hopkins campus. A decade ago, astronomers discovered that what is true for your car keys is not true for the galaxies. Having been impelled apart by the force of the Big Bang, the galaxies, in...
  • Earth’s Universe Grandeur

    04/05/2008 7:42:31 PM PDT · by Revski · 2 replies · 342+ views
    YouTube Video (o7jimmy) ^ | 4/508 | Revski
    This is a video of some of earth’s universe grandeur. The song is, God Is So Good, sung by children. The pictures and images were taken by Hubble telescope and the last image is called the Cat’s Eye Nebula.
  • Dark Understanding of Matter

    03/25/2008 4:53:00 AM PDT · by Renfield · 3 replies · 189+ views
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | 3-25-08 | Stephen Smith
    Images from the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed a so-called "ring of dark matter" circling a galaxy cluster. Does dark matter exist? Or is electricity a better explanation for the structure of the universe? {Galaxy Cluster CL0024+17 with an overlay showing a supposed dark matter ring. Credit: NASA, ESA, M. J. Jee and H. Ford et al. (Johns Hopkins University)} In a recent announcement, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) reported the discovery of something in deep space that seems to confirm previously inferred observations of "dark matter." Although "dark matter" cannot be seen or detected by instruments, its...
  • Star explodes halfway across universe (NASA's Swift detects star's GRB; reached Earth early Wed.)

    03/21/2008 4:07:07 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 82 replies · 1,085+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 3/21/08 | Seth Borenstein - ap
    WASHINGTON - The explosion of a star halfway across the universe was so huge it set a record for the most distant object that could be seen on Earth by the naked eye. The aging star, in a previously unknown galaxy, exploded in a gamma ray burst 7.5 billion light years away, its light finally reaching Earth early Wednesday. The gamma rays were detected by NASA's Swift satellite at 2:12 a.m. "We'd never seen one before so bright and at such a distance," NASA's Neil Gehrels said. It was bright enough to be seen with the naked eye. However, NASA...
  • History Channel - The Universe - Before the Big Bang

    02/25/2008 1:30:39 PM PST · by backtothestreets · 113 replies · 1,398+ views
    February 25, 2008 | Chuck Plante - aka backtothestreets
    Heads up! Tomorrow night (February 26, 2008 at 9:00 PM), the History Channel will air a new segment of their Universe series that could be very interesting. It will try to address what was before the Big Bang. This is a subject I don't see anyway of discussing without raising religious beliefs.
  • NASA to launch Beatles tune ’Across the Universe’

    02/01/2008 3:26:34 PM PST · by Samwise · 53 replies · 223+ views
    Herald Tribune ^ | February 1, 2008 | Associated Press
    The Beatles are about to become radio stars in a whole new way. NASA on Monday will broadcast the Beatles' song "Across the Universe" across the galaxy to Polaris, the North Star. This first-ever beaming of a radio song by the space agency directly into deep space is nostalgia-driven. It celebrates the 40th anniversary of the song, the 45th anniversary of NASA's Deep Space Network, which communicates with its distant probes, and the 50th anniversary of NASA. "Send my love to the aliens," Paul McCartney told NASA through a Beatles historian. "All the best, Paul." The song, written by McCartney...
  • Perfectly Aligned Galaxies Found For The First Time

    01/11/2008 6:29:35 PM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 160+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 1-11-2008 | John Roach
    Perfectly Aligned Galaxies Found For the First Time John Roach for National Geographic NewsJanuary 11, 2008 Astronomers have found three galaxies in a never before seen perfect alignment—a discovery that may help scientists better understand the mysterious dark matter and dark energy believed to dominate the universe. The three galaxies are like beads on a string, one directly behind the other, scientists announced yesterday at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. This makes the massive galaxy closest to Earth appear nestled in a pair of circular halos known as Einstein rings. The phenomenon occurs because the...
  • Mysterious Explosion Detected In The Distant Past, Halfway Back To Big Bang

    01/09/2008 1:58:38 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 74+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 1-8-2008 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.
    Mysterious Explosion Detected In The Distant Past, Halfway Back To Big BangNobody knows how the short gamma-ray burst GRB 070714B was triggered, but a leading possibility is the in-spiral and merger of two neutron stars, depicted in this artist rendition. (Credit: NASA/Dana Berry) ScienceDaily (Jan. 9, 2008) — Using the powerful one-two combo of NASA’s Swift satellite and the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have detected a mysterious type of cosmic explosion farther back in time than ever before. The explosion, known as a short gamma-ray burst (GRB), took place 7.4 billion years ago, more than halfway back to the Big Bang....