Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $15,418
17%  
Woo hoo!!! And the first 17% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: transit

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • $2 million study looks at hyperloop – 700 mph transit – that would cross Pennsylvania

    10/13/2019 8:19:47 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 61 replies
    The Patriot-News ^ | September 26, 2019 | Jana Benscoter
    Will a hyperloop work in Pennsylvania? That’s the question officials from legislative and executive branches, statewide agencies, organizations and departments, as well as a handful of private business leaders are trying to answer. Fifty people, invited to a workshop at Dixon University in Harrisburg on Wednesday, met to talk about the possibility of building a hyperloop system in the commonwealth. The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission has until April 2020 to complete a $2 million state-legislative commissioned study on its viability. Media wasn’t permitted to attend the invitation-only meeting. According to the turnpike’s research, a hyperloop combines a magnetic levitation train and...
  • I-5 lanes to close for trolley bridge construction

    10/11/2019 12:23:30 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    FOX 5 San Diego ^ | October 8, 2019 | City News Service
    SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Association of Governments will partially close a section of Interstate 5 in La Jolla Tuesday evening to continue construction of a future trolley bridge. Work crews will close all northbound lanes of I-5 from state Route 52 to La Jolla Village Drive from 9:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. Wednesday morning to pour concrete for the future bridge. Motorists on northbound I-5 will be detoured to I-805 via state Route 52, according to SANDAG. SANDAG crews completed similar closures of southbound I-5 last week to pour concrete for the future trolley bridge, which will cross...
  • Study suggests high-speed transit system to mountains could provide economic benefits

    08/24/2019 11:57:59 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 72 replies
    Sky-Hi News ^ | August 21, 2019 | Sawyer D'Argonne
    A high-speed transit system through the mountain corridor could serve as a major economic boon to communities on the Western Slope, according to a new study recently published by Development Research Partners. A high-speed transit system — likely in the form of a train that would carry passengers and light freight between Denver International Airport and Eagle County Regional Airport — was listed in the 2011 Record of Decision issued by the Colorado Department of Transportation and the Federal Highways Administration as a potential long-term solution to dealing with congestion on Interstate 70. Late last year, stakeholders — including the...
  • Where I-95 traffic is the absolute worst

    07/20/2019 12:55:15 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 53 replies
    WTOP ^ | July 17, 2019 | Max Smith
    The traffic jams over the Occoquan are so much worse than on any other part of Interstate 95 in Virginia that they throw off the scale of a review of potential traffic improvements for I-95 from North Carolina to the Potomac River. Initial analysis ahead of public meetings this week to identify the Virginia trouble spots shows people spend more than 1.2 million hours a year in delays in just the 1-mile southbound stretch over the Occoquan River. The miles leading up to that are only slightly better, regularly slowed to around 30 mph. Overall, at least 70% of delays...
  • Why Federal Highway Policy Is a Speed Bump Slowing Down Better Roads

    07/15/2019 2:08:13 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 13 replies
    The Daily Signal ^ | July 12, 2019 | David Ditch
    Taxpayers from all 50 states pay into the Highway Trust Fund when they fill their tanks with gas or diesel fuel. That sends billions of dollars a year to Washington, which then cuts checks to state governments in the form of infrastructure grants overseen by federal bureaucrats. It’s hard to tell just what shuffling so much money from one level of government to another is supposed to accomplish. In point of fact, the system creates many speed bumps that prevent our highway system from delivering the value it ought to. A Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Wednesday...
  • Policy Tip Sheet: Gas Taxes are not the Long-Term Solution to Funding Transportation

    07/14/2019 12:23:23 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 17 replies
    The Heartland Institute ^ | July 11, 2019 | Matthew Glans
    In this Policy Tip Sheet, Matthew Glans examines gasoline taxes, how they have become less effective over time, and why states can no longer rely on them to fund state transportation projects. Problem Gasoline taxes are an unreliable funding source for state transportation projects, road construction, and maintenance due to declining gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient vehicles. In 2015, Daniel Vock, writing for Governing, analyzed state gas tax data reported to the U.S. Census Bureau and found two-thirds of state fuel taxes failed to keep up with inflation. Moreover, gasoline taxes are regressive and produce widespread economic consequences. Increasing fuel...
  • How to do infrastructure right

    07/07/2019 6:32:19 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | June 06, 019 | Nicole Gelinas
    In late April, President Trump and Democratic congressional leaders finally found something they agreed on: infrastructure. Outside the White House after a meeting with the president, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the California Democrat, issued the pronouncement, “Big and bold.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, the Democrat from New York, echoed the takeaway: “We agreed on a number, which was very, very good, $2 trillion.” Trump himself has been publicly quiet but didn’t dispute that he told the Democrats he “like[s] the number.” By May, this renewed spirit of cooperation had fallen apart, at least temporarily, with a second meeting collapsing...
  • 'Wasteful and pointless': Watchdog lists 'biggest boondoggles' to ease highway gridlock

    07/06/2019 4:07:52 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 36 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | July 3, 2019 | Dan Boylan
    A public interest advocacy group has identified the country’s “most wasteful and pointless” transportation projects, which are costing taxpayers $25 billion. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) cites among “the biggest boondoggles” a $2.2 billion widening of Interstate 81 in Virginia, a $7 billion interstate project in Houston and a $802 million “Connecting Miami” redesign of city highways. According to PIRG, widening highways to reduce gridlock fails for several reasons. Multiple studies show that more road space over time leads to further congestion because of a phenomenon called “induced demand.” “We’re stuck in a car-centric rut in the United...
  • Bonding toll revenue allows work on I-405 project to begin

    06/14/2019 3:46:56 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 4 replies
    The Everett Herald-Net ^ | June 10, 2019 | Lizz Giordano
    A date for at least a bit of congestion relief has been set for commuters on I-405 between Bothell and Lynnwood. During the last session, state legislators approved the bonding of I-405 toll revenue, allowing the build-out of at least one highway project to begin sooner. Construction to widen I-405 between highways 522 and 527, which will add another express toll lane in each direction, will now start by 2021, according to Craig Smiley, a spokesperson for the Washington State Department of Transportation. The project also includes building direct access ramps from Highway 522 onto the express toll lanes, and...
  • 21st Century Policy Opinion: Stop Federal Spending Outside Freight Corridors

    06/12/2019 4:39:38 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 18 replies
    For Construction Pros ^ | June 10, 2019 | Marc Scribner, senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute
    The U.S. Interstate Highway System is the backbone of American commerce and personal travel. Funded on a pay-as-you-go basis largely through federal excise taxes on motor fuel, today it accounts for 25% of total vehicle-miles traveled despite accounting for just 2.5% of total road network lane-miles. Yet, much of the Interstate system, construction of which began in the 1950s, is nearing the end of its functional life, along with the infrastructure of other surface transportation modes. Over the next two decades, trillions of dollars of investment will be needed to rehabilitate and in some cases rebuild this infrastructure, according to...
  • More than just a toll roads agency: CTRMA touts transit, bike and walking infrastructure

    06/01/2019 5:59:54 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 9 replies
    The Austin Monitor ^ | May 15, 2019 | Jack Craver
    The Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority’s ability to build new toll roads may be temporarily stymied by opposition from state leaders, but the agency is keeping busy with major ongoing projects. While the great majority of its spending is on expanding roadway capacity for cars, CTRMA Executive Director Mike Heiligenstein emphasized the millions the agency is investing in bike and pedestrian infrastructure in a Tuesday presentation to the Travis County Commissioners Court. The $108 million construction of State Highway 45 SW, linking MoPac Expressway with FM 1626, will be accompanied by a 4.5-mile shared-use path, along with pedestrian and bicycle...
  • ‘Prosperity in Peril’: DC region bus study recommends significant changes

    04/29/2019 11:50:45 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 11 replies
    WTOP ^ | April 29, 2019 | Max Smith
    The D.C. region could be suffocated by even more traffic if major improvements to the region’s bus system do not come soon, a draft report obtained by WTOP finds. Even so, making those changes in a way that avoids negative impacts could be extremely challenging. The Washington Area Bus Transformation Project draft strategy’s executive summary, labeled “not for circulation,” paints a dire picture of what happens if bus-only lanes, totally revamped bus routes and other changes are not implemented: “Without transforming the bus system, the region’s competitiveness and livability are at risk.” The report groups more than two dozen recommendations...
  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Praises the Washington, D.C. Metro

    04/09/2019 8:06:03 AM PDT · by C19fan · 42 replies
    PJ Media ^ | April 8, 2019 | Tyler O'Neill
    On Sunday, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) praised the Washington, D.C. Metro, apparently oblivious to the fires and horrific management problems the Metro faces. "DC Metro is pretty good, especially when compared to the MTA lately," Ocasio-Cortez said in a Facebook "moment," contrasting the D.C. Metro to the New York subway. "It's clear they are investing in public infrastructure w/modernized train cars, etc." She responded to criticism shortly afterward. "Lots of folks begging to differ on DC metro being better," the congresswoman added. "I just got here so taking the train on a Sunday without a delay or track change or...
  • Albuquerque’s Electric Bus Takes a Wrong Turn and Goes Nowhere

    03/30/2019 3:14:40 PM PDT · by JeepersFreepers · 37 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | March 29, 2019 | Stephen Ford
    Whether it’s the Washington, D.C., streetcar, California’s bullet train, or New York’s Second Avenue subway, public-transit projects are almost always disruptive, delayed, over budget or underused—if not all of the above. Add another example to the list: a dead-end bus line in Albuquerque, N.M. Today, more than 16 months after Mayor Berry hopped on ART’s first ride, the bus lanes are empty. In 2016 the city paid $23 million for a fleet of 18 all-electric buses from the Chinese company Build Your Dreams. The system for charging the buses’ batteries proved faulty, and city inspectors found problems with the air...
  • Audit transportation dollars before considering tolls

    03/20/2019 7:55:50 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 10 replies
    The Day ^ | March 3, 2019 | Timothy M. Herbst
    I recently had the privilege of representing residents in eastern Connecticut that were opposed to the construction of the proposed state police gun range immediately adjacent to Pachaug State Forest. I personally thanked Gov. Ned Lamont for keeping his word in opposing this project. In politics, you are only as good as your word. That is why Lamont must also keep his word and not institute tolling on cars in Connecticut. Leaders in Hartford are missing the mark when it comes to tolling. They always seek to find alternate revenue sources through taxes or fees before first examining priorities, spending...
  • Easier Metro access, more regional bike trails approved as Md. pushes back on free toll plan

    03/16/2019 10:51:28 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 10 replies
    WTOP ^ | December 20, 2018 | Max Smith
    WASHINGTON — Efforts to alleviate traffic for tens of thousands of D.C.-area commuters were approved Wednesday, but not before Maryland attempted to eliminate a provision pushing for uniform tolling practices across the region’s express lanes. The resolution adopted by the region’s Transportation Planning Board is the first concrete action toward new goals developed over the last two years to reduce traffic jams and get people from home to work or other activities faster and with more efficiency. “The first step, a concrete effort, toward the projects, programs and policies this region [will] fund and implement in the coming years,” said...
  • Maryland is focusing on adding toll lanes in plan to widen the Beltway and I-270

    03/14/2019 10:55:15 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 13 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | February 14, 2019 | Lus Lazo
    As part of its controversial plan to widen the Capital Beltway and Interstate 270, Maryland says it intends to focus on the implementation of toll lanes — as many as four on each highway — and abandon earlier considerations of more general-purpose lanes, bus rapid transit and bus-only lanes. Maryland transportation officials have narrowed the number of possible construction alternatives to seven from an original list of 15 for further study of potential toll operations in the two corridors that suffer some of the worst traffic congestion in the region. Gov. Larry Hogan (R) in September 2017 proposed widening the...
  • Advisory panel says highway-capping ‘Stitch’ project could cost $452M

    03/03/2019 1:09:07 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 21 replies
    Curbed Atlanta ^ | March 1, 2019 | Sean Keenan
    After roaming around and studying downtown for a week, the Urban Land Institute’s advisory services panel provided Atlanta leaders with recommendations on how to move forward with the colossal proposed “Stitch” project. On Friday, ULI, which conducts land use research for cities around the globe, suggested the time is now to partner with local elected officials and philanthropic organizations to get the ball rolling on fundraising efforts for the potentially 14-acre project that would install a massive park and new construction above the Downtown Connector. But in order to be competitive for public and private funding—panelists expect the highway-capping project...
  • “It’s nightmarish”: Colorado faces meager budget in fight against I-70 ski traffic

    02/24/2019 8:17:38 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 31 replies
    The Colorado Sun ^ | February 23, 2019 | Thomas Peipert, The Associated Press
    “Friends don’t let friends drive I-70.” The tongue-in-cheek mantra is often uttered by Colorado skiers and snowboarders who frequent resorts far from the crowded mountain corridor, which funnels thousands of vehicles onto two lanes west of Denver every winter weekend. “It’s nightmarish. Hours and hours in the car. I think the last time I went to Keystone (typically a 90-minute drive from Denver), I spent four hours getting there and five hours getting home,” said Cole Capsalis of Denver. “There was more time in the car than skiing.”
  • DeWine proposing 18-cent increase in state gas tax, generating $1.2 billion

    02/20/2019 10:19:05 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 51 replies
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | February 20, 2019 | Randy Ludlow and Jim Siegel
    Gov. Mike DeWine will propose an 18-cents a gallon increase in the gasoline tax to maintain and upgrade Ohio’s roads and bridges in the transportation budget he submits to lawmakers Thursday. That would amount to a 64 percent increase in the state’s current 28-cent gas tax, which the state transportation director has said is insufficient for the state and local governments to maintain current roads or finish major new construction projects. DeWine revealed the number Wednesday on WTAM in Cleveland. He did not disclose if the amount would be phased in over multiple years. He also did not discuss if...