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Keyword: transit

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  • Coronavirus Prompts Revised Transit Policies [semi-satire]

    03/24/2020 10:23:07 AM PDT · by John Semmens · 2 replies
    Semi-News/Semi-Satire ^ | 22 March 2020 | John Semmens
    In a bid to protect citizens from undue exposure to the coronavirus, the Madison, Wisconsin Metro Transit system has issued new guidelines for bus operations. Starting this week, Metro Transit will limit the number of persons allowed on a bus to one at a time. Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway pointed out that “since each bus requires a driver, no passengers will be allowed on board as long as the driver is behind the wheel. We recognize that ordinarily this would present a hardship for those who depend on public transit to get around the City. To mitigate the hardship on riders,...
  • Virginia’s Recent Extremism a Warning Sign for Other States

    01/28/2020 4:11:39 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 26 replies
    The Daily Signal ^ | January 27, 2020 | Jarrett Stepman
    The Old Dominion is trending in an ominous direction, and it’s a problem for the whole country. On Monday, the Virginia General Assembly ratified the Equal Rights Amendment. Advocates of the ERA have argued that Virginia is the 38th and final state needed to add it to the Constitution, though the legal argument for that is dubious. Nevertheless, if the ERA were to become law, it would almost certainly provide the legal basis to enshrine left-wing social dogmas nationwide, among other negative consequences. Other states should take note: No matter how conservative your state has been in the past, you’re...
  • PA Turnpike tolls go up 6% in 2020, but smaller increases expected beginning in 2023

    12/31/2019 4:45:29 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 31 replies
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | December 29, 2019 | Ed Blazina
    Pennsylvania Turnpike users can expect 6% toll increases in 2020 and 2021 but then — if the state Legislature follows through with plans to change how the state funds public transit — the rate of annual increases gradually will go down to 3% in 2028. Nikolaus Grieshaber, the turnpike’s chief financial officer, outlined the agency’s financial future recently in an interview with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the 6% toll hike that begins Jan. 5. The increase marks the 12th year in a row that rates have gone up and will increase the fee for a car traveling the length of...
  • Environmental groups concerned about I-94 project through north Minneapolis

    12/21/2019 11:45:32 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 10 replies
    MPR News ^ | November 20, 2019 | Elizabeth Shockman
    State transportation officials want to do something about traffic and safety on Interstate 94 between downtown Minneapolis and Interstate 694, as well as state Highway 252 between I-694 and Highway 610. Minnesota Department of Transportation is considering converting a stretch of highway into a freeway and putting MnPASS lanes on I-94 and 252. But some are raising concerns about what the proposed changes might mean for residents of north Minneapolis who live along the I-94 corridor. Alex Burns is chair of the Sierra Club North Star Chapter's land use and transportation team. He said that more traffic on I-94 will...
  • RCCAO report cites heightened need for road pricing

    12/15/2019 8:06:19 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 13 replies
    Daily Commercial News (ConstructConnect) ^ | December 6, 2019 | Don Wall
    New analysis of projected provincial gas tax revenues in Ontario has revealed that that source of provincial funding will fall much more dramatically than predicted just five years ago due to increased use of electric vehicles and other factors. And so, concludes Trent University professor emeritus Harry Kitchen in a new report titled Ontario’s Downward Trend for Fuel Revenue: Will Road Pricing Fill the Gap?, the provincial government must look for other sources of revenues to build transportation infrastructure. Kitchen recommends road pricing, such as tolls and HOT lanes, with funds raised earmarked for future transportation improvements, and dynamic parking...
  • Industry Stakeholders React Positively to Biden's Infrastructure Plan

    11/20/2019 10:32:25 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 26 replies
    Transport Topics ^ | November 19, 2019 | Eleanor Lamb
    Presidential candidate Joe Biden has released an infrastructure plan that calls for $1.3 trillion in investment over 10 years. The plan, released Nov. 14, makes a pledge to update the nation’s freight infrastructure, from highways and canals to railroads and tunnels. Biden plans to spend $50 billion over the first year of his presidency to repair roads, highways and bridges. He proposes a new $40 billion, 10-year Transformational Projects Fund, which will provide substantial grants for projects that are too large to be funded through existing programs, such as a major port upgrade or new tunnel. Biden also plans to...
  • 2019 Bridge Inventory: States struggle to keep up with deteriorating bridges

    11/16/2019 6:49:01 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 24 replies
    Equipment World's Better Roads ^ | November 11, 2019 | Don McLoud
    With few exceptions, states are losing the battle with aging bridges in need of repair or replacement. Even states with low percentages of bridges rated poor are finding it difficult to keep up with bridge and road systems that in many cases are 50 years old or older. Utah, which ranks fourth for the lowest percentage of poor bridges, programs a bridge for repair or replacement in the year after it drops to a poor rating, completing the project within four or five years. The Utah Department of Transportation notes, though, that the number of bridges falling from good to...
  • Lake Nona gets $20 million federal grant for driverless bus system, other improvements

    11/15/2019 12:52:21 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Orlando Sentinel ^ | November 12, 2019 | Steve Lemongello
    Orange County has received a $20 million federal grant to expand its autonomous shuttle system at Lake Nona, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao said Tuesday, part of a combined $62 million in transportation awards to three Florida cities. Chao was at Lake Nona, a southeast Orlando neighborhood, along with Gov. Ron DeSantis and state transportation secretary Kevin Thibault to reveal a combined $883 million in Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) grants nationwide. Orange County was among just a handful out of more than 600 applications across the U.S. to get funding. The grant to the Orange’s Local...
  • Maryland and Virginia to rebuild and widen the American Legion Bridge, governors say

    11/15/2019 12:47:04 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 35 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | November 12, 2019 | Robert McCartney, Luz Lazo and Katherine Shaver
    Maryland and Virginia will partner to rebuild and widen the American Legion Bridge in a ­billion-dollar project to relieve congestion at the Washington region’s worst traffic bottleneck, the states’ governors announced Tuesday. In an unusual example of interstate cooperation, Virginia has agreed to help pay for the project even though most of the bridge — like the Potomac River flowing beneath it — belongs to Maryland. The plan marks a breakthrough in a years-long impasse over widening the bridge on the northwestern stretch of the Capital Beltway. In the past, Maryland has said it didn’t have enough money for the...
  • Don’t expect Hogan to boost Maryland taxes for transit

    11/09/2019 2:29:07 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 8 replies
    WTOP ^ | November 4, 2019 | Bruce DePuyt, Maryland Matters
    As he travels the state with top administrators from the Maryland Department of Transportation, Secretary Pete K. Rahn hears a frequent plea from business leaders, environmentalists and the public — expand bus and rail options, so travelers don’t have to be so dependent on their cars. Rahn has a ready response for transit advocates: Under Gov. Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R), Maryland is spending more on transit than at any other time. “We’re at 42 percent of the state [transportation] trust fund going to transit already, with 3 percent of the revenues coming from transit,” Rahn told a reporter in...
  • Mark your calendars: Celestial event of the year Nov. 11 [Mercury Transit Sun]

    11/03/2019 6:29:49 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    clickorlando.com ^ | November 02, 2019 | Jonathan Kegges
    NEVER LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN. SPECIAL GLASSES OR FILTER WILL BE NEEDED TO VIEW. Just like the solar eclipse in 2017, special glasses or filters will be required to view the transit. Since Mercury is so small, however, you will also need binoculars or a telescope to view. Use extreme caution when using magnification to look at the sun. If using binoculars or a telescope, make sure the proper solar film is installed on the front lens, not the eyepiece for safe viewing. An even safer way to view the sun is to project the image on to something.
  • Ohio planners looking at a 30-year timeline for hyperloop project between Pittsburgh and Chicago

    10/18/2019 8:37:05 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 38 replies
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | October 17, 2019 | Ed Blazina
    Ohio planners will move full speed ahead on a proposed hyperloop system that would carry passengers between Pittsburgh and Chicago in about 58 minutes for a one-way cost of about $93. But the full system, known as Mid-West Connect, probably wouldn’t be finished until about 2050. Thea Walsh, director of transportation and funding for the Columbus, Ohio-based Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, said this week the agency is putting the finishing touches on feasibility and environmental impact studies but has concluded it should pursue the hyperloop system. The system being developed by Virgin Hyperloop One would move passengers and freight in...
  • $2 million study looks at hyperloop – 700 mph transit – that would cross Pennsylvania

    10/13/2019 8:19:47 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 63 replies
    The Patriot-News ^ | September 26, 2019 | Jana Benscoter
    Will a hyperloop work in Pennsylvania? That’s the question officials from legislative and executive branches, statewide agencies, organizations and departments, as well as a handful of private business leaders are trying to answer. Fifty people, invited to a workshop at Dixon University in Harrisburg on Wednesday, met to talk about the possibility of building a hyperloop system in the commonwealth. The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission has until April 2020 to complete a $2 million state-legislative commissioned study on its viability. Media wasn’t permitted to attend the invitation-only meeting. According to the turnpike’s research, a hyperloop combines a magnetic levitation train and...
  • I-5 lanes to close for trolley bridge construction

    10/11/2019 12:23:30 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 3 replies
    FOX 5 San Diego ^ | October 8, 2019 | City News Service
    SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Association of Governments will partially close a section of Interstate 5 in La Jolla Tuesday evening to continue construction of a future trolley bridge. Work crews will close all northbound lanes of I-5 from state Route 52 to La Jolla Village Drive from 9:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. Wednesday morning to pour concrete for the future bridge. Motorists on northbound I-5 will be detoured to I-805 via state Route 52, according to SANDAG. SANDAG crews completed similar closures of southbound I-5 last week to pour concrete for the future trolley bridge, which will cross...
  • Study suggests high-speed transit system to mountains could provide economic benefits

    08/24/2019 11:57:59 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 72 replies
    Sky-Hi News ^ | August 21, 2019 | Sawyer D'Argonne
    A high-speed transit system through the mountain corridor could serve as a major economic boon to communities on the Western Slope, according to a new study recently published by Development Research Partners. A high-speed transit system — likely in the form of a train that would carry passengers and light freight between Denver International Airport and Eagle County Regional Airport — was listed in the 2011 Record of Decision issued by the Colorado Department of Transportation and the Federal Highways Administration as a potential long-term solution to dealing with congestion on Interstate 70. Late last year, stakeholders — including the...
  • Where I-95 traffic is the absolute worst

    07/20/2019 12:55:15 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 53 replies
    WTOP ^ | July 17, 2019 | Max Smith
    The traffic jams over the Occoquan are so much worse than on any other part of Interstate 95 in Virginia that they throw off the scale of a review of potential traffic improvements for I-95 from North Carolina to the Potomac River. Initial analysis ahead of public meetings this week to identify the Virginia trouble spots shows people spend more than 1.2 million hours a year in delays in just the 1-mile southbound stretch over the Occoquan River. The miles leading up to that are only slightly better, regularly slowed to around 30 mph. Overall, at least 70% of delays...
  • Why Federal Highway Policy Is a Speed Bump Slowing Down Better Roads

    07/15/2019 2:08:13 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 13 replies
    The Daily Signal ^ | July 12, 2019 | David Ditch
    Taxpayers from all 50 states pay into the Highway Trust Fund when they fill their tanks with gas or diesel fuel. That sends billions of dollars a year to Washington, which then cuts checks to state governments in the form of infrastructure grants overseen by federal bureaucrats. It’s hard to tell just what shuffling so much money from one level of government to another is supposed to accomplish. In point of fact, the system creates many speed bumps that prevent our highway system from delivering the value it ought to. A Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Wednesday...
  • Policy Tip Sheet: Gas Taxes are not the Long-Term Solution to Funding Transportation

    07/14/2019 12:23:23 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 17 replies
    The Heartland Institute ^ | July 11, 2019 | Matthew Glans
    In this Policy Tip Sheet, Matthew Glans examines gasoline taxes, how they have become less effective over time, and why states can no longer rely on them to fund state transportation projects. Problem Gasoline taxes are an unreliable funding source for state transportation projects, road construction, and maintenance due to declining gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient vehicles. In 2015, Daniel Vock, writing for Governing, analyzed state gas tax data reported to the U.S. Census Bureau and found two-thirds of state fuel taxes failed to keep up with inflation. Moreover, gasoline taxes are regressive and produce widespread economic consequences. Increasing fuel...
  • How to do infrastructure right

    07/07/2019 6:32:19 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | June 06, 019 | Nicole Gelinas
    In late April, President Trump and Democratic congressional leaders finally found something they agreed on: infrastructure. Outside the White House after a meeting with the president, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the California Democrat, issued the pronouncement, “Big and bold.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, the Democrat from New York, echoed the takeaway: “We agreed on a number, which was very, very good, $2 trillion.” Trump himself has been publicly quiet but didn’t dispute that he told the Democrats he “like[s] the number.” By May, this renewed spirit of cooperation had fallen apart, at least temporarily, with a second meeting collapsing...
  • 'Wasteful and pointless': Watchdog lists 'biggest boondoggles' to ease highway gridlock

    07/06/2019 4:07:52 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 36 replies
    The Washington Times ^ | July 3, 2019 | Dan Boylan
    A public interest advocacy group has identified the country’s “most wasteful and pointless” transportation projects, which are costing taxpayers $25 billion. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) cites among “the biggest boondoggles” a $2.2 billion widening of Interstate 81 in Virginia, a $7 billion interstate project in Houston and a $802 million “Connecting Miami” redesign of city highways. According to PIRG, widening highways to reduce gridlock fails for several reasons. Multiple studies show that more road space over time leads to further congestion because of a phenomenon called “induced demand.” “We’re stuck in a car-centric rut in the United...