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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Got mass? Scientists observe electrons become both heavy and speedy

    06/20/2012 10:08:53 AM PDT · by Kevmo · 39 replies
    Phys Org ^ | June 13, 2012 | Phys Org
    Got mass? Scientists observe electrons become both heavy and speedy Electrons moving in certain solids can behave as if they are a thousand times more massive than free electrons, but at the same time act as superconductors. A new study led by Princeton scientists shows that this happens because of a process known as quantum entanglement that determines the mass of electrons moving in a crystal. The discovery can help improve understanding of how certain materials become superconducting, which may have applications in areas such as power network efficiency and computing speed. Credit: the Yazdani Group A Princeton University-led team...
  • Happy Birthday Nikola Tesla

    07/06/2006 7:02:41 PM PDT · by eleni121 · 168 replies · 2,380+ views
    NikolaTesla Memorial Society ^ | July 6, 2006 | Me
    The Nikola Tesla Monument within Queen Victoria Park, Niagara Falls (Canadian Side) will be unveiled on July 9, 2006 at 12 noon celebrating the 150th birthday of Nikola Tesla.
  • Is Dark Matter a Glimpse of a Deeper Level of Reality?

    06/13/2012 11:11:54 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 90 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 6/11/12 | George Musser
    Two years ago several of my Sci Am colleagues and I had an intense email exchange over a period of weeks, trying to figure out what to make of a new paper by string theorist Erik Verlinde. I don’t think I’ve ever been so flummoxed by physicists’ reactions to a paper. Mathematically it could hardly have been simpler—the level of middle-school algebra for the most part. Logically and physically, it was a head-hurter. I couldn’t decide whether it was profound or trite. The theorists we consulted said they couldn’t follow it, which we took as a polite way of saying...
  • Einstein Avenged: Neutrinos Bow to Light Speed Laws ("E=MC2, Dammit!")

    06/08/2012 8:33:17 PM PDT · by presidio9 · 107 replies
    TechNewsWorld ^ | 06/08/12 | Richard Adhikari
    Eight months after the multinational Opera research team caused an uproar among physicists with its findings that some neutrinos appeared to travel faster than light, its findings have been officially refuted. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on Friday said that four experiments have found that neutrinos actually travel no faster than the speed of light. Opera's original measurements can be attributed to a faulty element of its experiment's fiber optic timing system, CERN said. The findings were announced at the 25th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics in Kyoto, Japan, by CERN research director Sergio Bertolucci. Life...
  • Freeman Dyson: Science on the Rampage

    05/09/2012 10:28:59 AM PDT · by neverdem · 37 replies
    New York Review of Books ^ | April 5, 2012 | Freeman Dyson
    Physics on the Fringe: Smoke Rings, Circlons, and Alternative Theories of Everything by Margaret Wertheim Walker, 323 pp., $27.00                                                   Pierpont Morgan Library/Art Resource An engraving by William Blake from The Song of Los, 1795 Physics on the Fringe describes work done by amateurs, people rejected by the academic establishment and rejecting orthodox academic beliefs. They are often self-taught and ignorant of higher mathematics. Mathematics is the language spoken by the professionals. The amateurs offer an...
  • Chinese Physicists Teleport Photons Over 100 Kilometers

    05/12/2012 7:52:50 PM PDT · by Innovative · 59 replies
    Popular Science ^ | May 11, 2012 | Dan Nosowitz
    Teleportation, sci-fi-y as it sounds, is actually not fictional or even new; two years ago, Chinese physicists broke the then-current record for quantum teleportation by teleporting photons over 10 miles. But a new effort from that same team demolishes that record, beaming the photons over 97 kilometers. The physicists, working from the University of Science and Technology of China in Shanghai, have again taken advantage of quantum entanglement for the purposes of moving an object from one place to another without ever moving in the space between. According to Technology Review, "The idea is not that the physical object is...
  • Every Black Hole Contains a New Universe: A physicist presents a solution to present-day cosmic..

    06/04/2012 1:01:23 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Inside Science ^ | 5/17/12 | Nikodem Poplawski
    Inside Science Minds presents an ongoing series of guest columnists and personal perspectives presented by scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and others in the science community showcasing some of the most interesting ideas in science today.(ISM) -- Our universe may exist inside a black hole. This may sound strange, but it could actually be the best explanation of how the universe began, and what we observe today. It's a theory that has been explored over the past few decades by a small group of physicists including myself. Successful as it is, there are notable unsolved questions with the standard big bang theory,...
  • Universe has more hydrogen than we thought (Undark’ matter hidden in plain view)

    06/02/2012 11:45:49 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies
    The Register ^ | 31st May 2012 23:59 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A re-analysis of radio telescope observations from three countries has yielded a surprising result: nearby galaxies harbour one-third more hydrogen than had previously been estimated. While nothing like enough matter to solve physics’ “dark matter” problem, the work by CSIRO astronomer Dr Robert Braun (chief scientist at the agency’s Astronomy and Space Science division in Sydney) also helps explain why the rate of star formation has slowed down. While there’s more hydrogen than astronomers had thought, its distribution makes star formation more difficult. Andromeda – the galaxy headed for a catastrophic collision with our own in about four billion years...
  • Egyptian Teenager Invents New Space Propulsion System Based On Quantum Physics

    05/30/2012 9:27:05 AM PDT · by Altariel · 42 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | May 29, 2012 | Mario Aguilar
    Precocious young physicist Aisha Mustafa just patented a new system that could propel spacecrafts to the final frontier without using a drop of fuel. In short her system taps one of the odder facets of quantum theory, which posits that space isn't really a vacuum. It's really filled with particles and anti-particles that exist for infinitesimally small periods of time before destroying each other. Mustafa thinks she can harness them to create propulsion, resulting in space craft that need little-to-no fuel to maneuver around in space. Fast Company reports: Mustafa invented a way of tapping this quantum effect via what's...
  • Landmark calculation clears the way to answering how matter is formed

    05/28/2012 12:11:23 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 21 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 25, 2012 | Cindy Weiss
    May 25, 2012 By Cindy Weiss EnlargeThomas C. Blum, Associate Professor, Physics. Credit: Daniel Buttrey/UConn (Phys.org) -- An international collaboration of scientists, including Thomas Blum, associate professor of physics, is reporting in landmark detail the decay process of a subatomic particle called a kaon – information that may help answer fundamental questions about how the universe began. Ads by GoogleSix Sigma — Black Belt - Get Trained & Six Sigma Certified. Flexible, Top Program 100% online. - www.VillanovaU.com/SixSigmaThe research, reported online in the March 30, 2012 Physical Review Letters, used breakthrough techniques on some of the world’s fastest supercomputers to...
  • Big Blue supers crunch kaon decay

    05/28/2012 8:00:37 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 28 replies
    The Register ^ | 28th May 2012 00:14 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    Looking at the fundamental properties of matter can take some serious computing grunt. Take the calculation needed to help understand kaon decay – a subatomic particle interaction that helps explain why the universe is made of matter rather than anti-matter: it soaked up 54 million processor hours on Argonne National Laboratory’s BlueGene/P supercomputer near Chicago, along with time on Columbia University’s QCDOC machine, Fermi National Lab’s USQCD (the US Center for Quantum Chromo-Dynamic) Ds cluster, and the UK’s Iridis cluster at the University of Southampton and the DIRAC facility. The reason so much iron was needed: the kaon decay spans...
  • Symphony of science: The Quantum World

    05/27/2012 9:45:37 PM PDT · by Windflier · 46 replies
    YouTube ^ | September 2011 | John D Boswell
    A musical investigation into the nature of atoms and subatomic particles, the jiggly things that make up everything we see. Featuring Morgan Freeman, Stephen Hawking, Michio Kaku, Brian Cox, Richard Feynman, and Frank Close. "The Quantum World" is the eleventh installment in the ongoing Symphony of Science music video series. Track back to source website: Symphony of Science
  • Engineer: Star Trek’s Enterprise ship could be built in 20 years at a cost of $1 trillion

    05/18/2012 12:30:28 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 118 replies
    Yahoo News-YTech ^ | 5/18/12 | Tecca
    Whether you're a Trekkie or not, you have to admit that there's some sense of wonder toexploring the stars and trying to find life on distant planets. Of course, the U.S.S. Enterprise is a fictional ship, but have you ever put in the thought as to what it would take to actually build it, and when we could get it done if we really put in the effort? The man behind the well-researched site buildtheenterprise.org has, and he's determined that a fully functional Enterprise is only 20 years away if we put in the effort.
  • Will and Norm Visit the Reed Research Reactor (VIDEO)

    05/14/2012 3:35:59 PM PDT · by matt04 · 1 replies
    Tested takes a trip to Reed College in Portland, Oregon. This isn't just where Steve Jobs went to school, it's the home of the Reed Research Reactor, the only nuclear reactor in the world that's operated by undergraduate students. We learn how the reactor works and get a demonstration in sample irradiation. It's real science!
  • Science and the Republican Brain

    04/30/2012 2:21:50 PM PDT · by neverdem · 47 replies
    The American Magazine ^ | April 30, 2012 | Lee Harris
    The so-called Republican brain, with its deep resistance to yielding before mere scientific evidence, has played an indispensable role in the making of modern science, long before the emergence of the Grand Old Party. A new term of political opprobrium has been loosed upon the world: anti-science. Like many terms of abuse, it is easier to convey its meaning by an illustration than by a rigorous definition. For example, “If those damn Republicans weren’t so anti-science, we might have a chance of dealing with global warming.” Here’s another example: “Those damn Republicans are so anti-science that they want to see...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Higgs Boson Explained by Cartoon

    05/01/2012 2:52:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | May 01, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What is all this fuss about the Higgs boson? The physics community is abuzz that a fundamental particle expected by the largely successful Standard Model of particle physics may soon be found by the huge Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Europe. The term boson refers to a type of fundamental particle with similarities to the photon, while Higgs refers to Peter Higgs, a physicist who among others published research predicting the mechanism through which such a particle might act. The above animated cartoon explains in humorous but impressive detail why the Higgs boson is expected, and one...
  • Session 463 Advanced Concepts: LENR, Anti-Matter, and New Physics

    04/20/2012 7:01:42 AM PDT · by Wonder Warthog · 14 replies
    Cold Fusion Now ^ | April 17, 2012 | Ruby Carat
    On Friday, March 23 I attended Session 462 Advanced Concepts: LENR, Anti-Matter, and New Physics of the Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space conference, one day after speaking with George H. Miley who would be presenting A Game-Changing Power Source for Spacecraft at the session. Part 1 of event was an account of my talk with Professor Miley. Part 2 continues with this paraphrase of the four talks included in Session 462. Unable to obtain video of the event, an audio recording formed the basis of this summary. ...................... “What happens is really intriguing here with this palladium-rich nano-particle run....
  • For the First Time, Electrons are Observed Splitting into Smaller Quasi-Particles

    04/20/2012 6:56:50 AM PDT · by zeugma · 25 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 04.19.2012 | Clay Dillow
    For the First Time, Electrons are Observed Splitting into Smaller Quasi-Particles   We generally think of electrons as fundamental building blocks of atoms, elementary subatomic particles with no smaller components to speak of. But according to Swiss and German researchers reporting in Nature this week, we are wrong to think so. For the first time, the researchers have recorded an observation of an electron splitting into two different quasi-particles, each taking different characteristics of the original electron with it. Using samples of the copper-oxide compound Sr2CuO3, the researchers lifted some of the electrons belonging to the copper atoms out of...
  • “Math Education: An Inconvenient Truth” Reaches 1,000,000 Views

    04/20/2012 4:27:02 PM PDT · by BruceDeitrickPrice · 56 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | April 20, 2012 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    Here’s some good news. M. J. McDermott’s wonderful video about why Americans don’t know math has exceeded 1,000,000 views. This is one of the best videos about education on the web. If you haven’t viewed it, please do. Running time is about 15 minutes. In this video, McDermott explains the flaws in so-called Reform Math, which was introduced to the country around 1985. Reform Math actually consists of more than a dozen separate but basically identical curricula. As fast as a community figures out that one of these things is bad, the so-called experts introduce another. These experts are diabolically...
  • Has Dark Matter Gone Missing?

    04/19/2012 9:54:03 PM PDT · by neverdem · 41 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 19 April 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Home sweet home. In the vicinity of the sun, our Milky Way galaxy seems to contain no dark matter, one team of astronomers claims. Credit: Serge Brunier/NASA If a new study is true, then the search for dark matter just got a lot weirder. Our little corner of the Milky Way contains no observable concentration of the mysterious stuff whose gravity binds the galaxy, claims one team of astronomers. That finding would present a major problem for models of how galaxies form and may undermine the whole notion of dark matter, the researchers claim. But some scientists...
  • Technology in America

    04/14/2012 11:23:41 AM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies
    The American ^ | April 13, 2012 | Michael Sacasas
    If AmericaÂ’s ongoing experiment in democracy and economic freedom is to endure, we will need to think again about cultivating the necessary habits of the heart and resisting the allure of the ideology of technology. Why are Americans addicted to technology? The question has a distinctly contemporary ring, and we might be tempted to think it could only have been articulated within the last decade or two. Could we, after all, have known anything about technology addiction before the advent of the Blackberry? Well, as it turns out, Americans have a longstanding fascination and facility with technology, and the question...
  • Message Encoded in Neutrino Beam Transmitted through Solid Rock

    03/18/2012 11:29:14 PM PDT · by U-238 · 18 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | 3/16/2012 | John Matson
    Neutrinos are having a moment. They’re speeding across Europe (just how fast is under review), they’re changing flavors in China and, now, they’re carrying rudimentary messages through bedrock in Illinois. A team of physicists encoded a short string of letters on a beam of neutrinos at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., and sent the message to a detector more than a kilometer away. On the journey the neutrinos passed through 240 meters of solid rock, mostly shale. What was the word they transmitted in the preliminary demonstration? “Neutrino.” The experiment is described in a paper posted to the...
  • Scientists Create Quantum Computer in a Diamond

    04/08/2012 11:20:22 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 38 replies
    HardOCP ^ | Saturday April 07, 2012 | Al
    Scientists at the University of Southern California have created a computer within a diamond to test quantum computing theories. This research could lead to super computer speeds, but for the present is still in the experimental stage. A gratuitous tip of the hat to The Weazmeister for the linkage. A qubit can represent a 0 and a 1 at the same time. This is thanks to the quantum property of superposition, and it’s the property that may one day make quantum computers insanely fast. Comments
  • New data support Einstein on accelerating universe

    04/03/2012 1:00:38 AM PDT · by U-238 · 59 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/2/2012 | Elizabeth Quill
    Einstein is still the boss, say researchers with the BOSS project for measuring key properties of the universe. BOSS, for Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, has measured the distance to faraway galaxies more precisely than ever before, mapping the universe as it existed roughly 6 billion years ago, when it was only 63 percent of its current size. The findings suggest that the mysterious “dark energy” causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate was foreseen by Einstein, the researchers reported April 1 at the American Physical Society meeting. To keep the universe in a static state, Einstein added a...
  • Results From South Pole Support Einstein’s Cosmological Constant

    04/04/2012 1:05:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 5 replies
    R & D ^ | April 2,2012 | Staff
    Analysis of data from the National Science Foundation-(NSF) funded 10-m South Pole Telescope (SPT) in Antarctica provides new support for the most widely accepted explanation of dark energy, the source of the mysterious force that is responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe. The results begin to hone in on the tiny mass of the neutrinos, the most abundant particles in the universe, which until recently were thought to be without mass. The SPT data strongly support Albert Einstein's cosmological constant—the leading model for dark energy—even though researchers base the analysis on only a fraction of the SPT data...
  • How black holes grow

    04/03/2012 11:31:22 PM PDT · by U-238 · 19 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 3/3/2012 | University of Utah, Salt Lake City
    A study led by a University of Utah astrophysicist found a new explanation for the growth of supermassive black holes in the center of most galaxies: They repeatedly capture and swallow single stars from pairs of stars that wander too close. Using new calculations and previous observations of our Milky Way and other galaxies, “We found black holes grow enormously as a result of sucking in captured binary star partners,” said Ben Bromley from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. “I believe this has got to be the dominant method for growing supermassive black holes,” he said. “There...
  • Survey gets a grip on dark energy (the BOSS project - Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey)

    03/31/2012 3:07:36 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 20 replies
    BBC News ^ | 3/30/12 | Jonathan Amos
    Astronomers have measured the precise distance to over a quarter of a million galaxies to gain new insights into a key period in cosmic history. The 3D map of the sky allows scientists to probe the time six billion years ago when dark energy became the dominant influence on the Universe's expansion. No-one knows the true nature of this repulsive force, but the exquisite data in the international BOSS survey will help test various theories. The analysis appears in six papers. These have all been posted on the arXiv preprint server. "This is an incredibly exciting time to be working...
  • Physicists find patterns in new state of matter

    03/29/2012 4:45:02 PM PDT · by U-238 · 20 replies
    Physorg.com ^ | 3/29/2012 | Physorg.com
    In a paper published in the March 29 issue of the journal Nature, the scientists describe the emergence of “spontaneous coherence,” “spin textures” and “phase singularities” when excitons—the bound pairs of electrons and holes that determine the optical properties of semiconductors and enable them to function as novel optoelectronic devices—are cooled to near absolute zero. This cooling leads to the spontaneous production of a new coherent state of matter which the physicists were finally able to measure in great detail in their basement laboratory at UC San Diego at a temperature of only one-tenth of a degree above absolute zero....
  • Pulsars: The universe's gift to physics

    03/28/2012 8:26:40 PM PDT · by U-238 · 13 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 2/20/2012 | NRAO
    Pulsars, superdense neutron stars, are perhaps the most extraordinary physics laboratories in the universe. Research on these extreme and exotic objects already has produced two Nobel Prizes. Pulsar researchers now are poised to learn otherwise-unavailable details of nuclear physics to test general relativity in conditions of extremely strong gravity, and to directly detect gravitational waves with a “telescope” nearly the size of our galaxy. Neutron stars are the remnants of massive stars that exploded as supernovae. They pack more than the mass of the Sun into a sphere no larger than a medium-sized city, making them the densest objects in...
  • Magnetic field researchers target 100-tesla goal

    03/25/2012 5:21:55 PM PDT · by brityank · 47 replies · 1+ views
    Los Alamos National Labs ^ | Saturday, March 24, 2012 | Staff
    Magnetic field researchers target Hundred-Tesla goal The 1,200-megajoule motor generator that powers the magnetic pulse.     ==> Previous world record shattered during six-experiment pulseLOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 22, 2012—Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s biggest magnet facility today met the grand challenge of producing magnetic fields in excess of 100 tesla while conducting six different experiments. The hundred-tesla level is roughly equivalent to 2 million times Earth’s magnetic field.“This is our moon shot, we’ve worked toward this for a decade and a half,” said Chuck Mielke, director of the Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos.The team used...
  • Recovering three-dimensional shape around a corner using ultrafast time-of-flight imaging

    03/20/2012 2:48:27 PM PDT · by Stoat · 4 replies · 2+ views
    Nature ^ | March 20, 2012 | Andreas Velten, et al
    The recovery of objects obscured by scattering is an important goal in imaging and has been approached by exploiting, for example, coherence properties, ballistic photons or penetrating wavelengths. Common methods use scattered light transmitted through an occluding material, although these fail if the occluder is opaque. Light is scattered not only by transmission through objects, but also by multiple reflection from diffuse surfaces in a scene. This reflected light contains information about the scene that becomes mixed by the diffuse reflections before reaching the image sensor. This mixing is difficult to decode using traditional cameras. Here we report the combination...
  • BREAKING NEWS: Error Undoes Faster-Than-Light Neutrino Results

    02/22/2012 2:21:19 PM PST · by Lonesome in Massachussets · 56 replies
    Science Insider ^ | 22 February 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    It appears that the faster-than-light neutrino results, announced last September by the OPERA collaboration in Italy, was due to a mistake after all. A bad connection between a GPS unit and a computer may be to blame. Physicists had detected neutrinos travelling from the CERN laboratory in Geneva to the Gran Sasso laboratory near L'Aquila that appeared to make the trip in about 60 nanoseconds less than light speed. Many other physicists suspected that the result was due to some kind of error, given that it seems at odds with Einstein's special theory of relativity, which says nothing can travel...
  • Hydrogen takes a new form

    03/10/2012 10:36:13 PM PST · by U-238 · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | 3/1/2012 | Alexandra Witze
    Squeezing hydrogen at extreme pressures changes it into a mix of honeycombed atoms layered with free-floating molecules — an entirely new state of the element and the first new phase found in decades. If confirmed, the discovery will be only the fourth known phase of hydrogen, the simplest element and one long probed for basic insights into the nature of matter. “I think we have pretty bulletproof evidence that there is a new phase,” says Eugene Gregoryanz of the University of Edinburgh, leader of the team that will report the work in an upcoming Physical Review Letters. Hydrogen’s first three...
  • IBM claims huge strides in quantum computing

    03/08/2012 7:01:25 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 51 replies
    CNET ^ | February 27, 2012 9:00 PM PS | Daniel Terdiman
    With its latest research, Big Blue says it's reached device performance close to the minimum requirements for implementing a "practical quantum computer." But many hurdles remain.Seen here is a silicon chip housing three superconducting quantum bits, or qubits. IBM believes qubits are the key to its quantum computing efforts. (Credit: IBM Research) Scientists at IBM say they have made a quantum computing breakthrough that demonstrates that a full-scale quantum computer is not only possible but is within reasonable reach. In an announcement being made today at the American Physical Society in Boston, Matthias Steffen, manager of IBM's experimental quantum computing...
  • Doctor Teller’s Strange Loves, from the Hydrogen Bomb to Thorium Energy

    03/07/2012 10:11:54 PM PST · by Kennard · 26 replies
    The Big Picture - ritholtz.com ^ | March 7, 2012 | Barry Ritholtz
    Edward Teller, the father of the hydrogen bomb, had a thing for nuclear bombs. He wanted them bigger, smaller, faster, used in ways that no one had thought of before or since, and always more of them. He suffered no fools, and though he would be more villified than any other American scientist in the 20th century, he always dismissed his critics as lacking in common sense or patriotism. Amid Cold War paranoia and fears of the Soviet nuclear program, the stakes were simply too high: for the free world, building the most powerful weapon in history was a matter...
  • Diet of a dying star

    03/06/2012 1:06:23 AM PST · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/11/2012 | Nadia Drake
    Scientists are beginning to sort out the stellar ingredients that produce a type 1a supernova, a type of cosmic explosion that has been used to measure the universe’s accelerating expansion. Two teams of researchers presented new data about these supernovas at the American Astronomical Society meeting on January 11. One team confirmed a long-held suspicion about the kind of star that explodes, and the second provided new evidence for what feeds that star until it bursts. “This is a confirmation of a decades-old belief, namely that a type 1a supernova comes from the explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf,” said...
  • Water not so squishy under pressure

    03/06/2012 1:09:39 AM PST · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Science News ^ | 3/5/2012 | Nadia Drake
    When squeezed to pressures and temperatures like those inside giant planets, water molecules are less squeezable than anticipated, defying a set of decades-old equations used to describe watery behavior over a range of conditions. Studying how molecules behave in such environments will help scientists better understand the formation and composition of ice giants like Uranus and Neptune, as well as those being spotted in swarms by planet hunters. The new work, which appears in the March 2 Physical Review Letters, also suggests that textbooks about planetary interiors and magnetic fields may need reworking. “At this point, it’s worth putting together...
  • Loose cable blamed for speedy neutrinos

    03/06/2012 1:16:25 AM PST · by U-238 · 41 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/23/2012 | Devin Powell
    Faulty wiring has been proposed as the glitch that caused a European physics experiment to clock particles flying faster than light. Scientists at Italy’s OPERA experiment reported in September that nearly weightless particles called neutrinos were apparently traveling from the CERN laboratory on the Swiss-French border to an underground detector in Italy, 730 kilometers away, faster than the speed of light. The apparent violation of Einstein’s theory of special relativity immediately produced a chorus of theorists offering reasons why neutrinos simply could not be going that fast (SN: 11/5/11, p. 10). “It was always clear to me that the results...
  • Physicists Measure the Skin of a Nucleus

    03/03/2012 9:41:05 PM PST · by neverdem · 20 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2 March 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Nuclear dermatology clinic. The vessel containing the lead sample in the PREX experiment (left) and the massive spectrometers used to detect the electrons scattered from the lead nuclei and measure the nuclei's skin. Credit: Photos Courtesy of Robert Michaels A large atomic nucleus is like a chocolate truffle with a gooey interior and a harder shell. Inside, the nucleus contains a mixture of protons and neutrons. Outside, it's covered with a nearly pure layer of neutrons—the "neutron skin." Now, for the first time, nuclear physicists have measured the thickness of that skin in a fairly direct way....
  • Official Word on Superluminal Neutrinos Leaves Warp-Drive Fans a Shred of Hope—Barely

    02/29/2012 4:45:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 13 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceInsider ^ | 24 February 2012 | Edwin Cartlidge
    The CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva has confirmed Wednesday's report that a loose fiber-optic cable may be behind measurements that seemed to show neutrinos outpacing the speed of light. But the lab also says another glitch could have caused the experiment to underestimate the particles' speed. In a statement based on an earlier press release from the OPERA collaboration, CERN said two possible "effects" may have influenced the anomalous measurements. One of them, due to a possible faulty connection between the fiber-optic cable bringing the GPS signals to OPERA and the detector's master clock, would have caused the experiment...
  • Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking Frequents Sex Clubs

    02/29/2012 3:19:45 AM PST · by grey_whiskers · 70 replies · 7+ views
    Mark this in your book of bizarre celebrity sightings. Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking is somewhat of a regular at a Devore, California sex club, RadarOnline.com is exclusively reporting. According to a source who has been a member of Freedom Acres swingers club for nearly half a decade, Hawking, 70, shows up to the club with a bevy of nurses and assistants and has naked woman grind on him.
  • String Theory Skeptics and Multiverse Mania

    02/23/2012 7:32:29 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 77 replies
    Not Even Wrong ^ | 02/21/2012 | Peter Woit
    My endless rants here about the hot field of multiverse studies are mainly motivated by concern about the effect this is having on particle theory. Multiverse scenarios all too often function as an excuse for not admitting that string theory/extra-dimensional ideas about unification have failed. Such an admission would encourage people to move on to more promising ideas, but instead hep-th is stuck in an endless doldrums with the high profile public face of the subject dominated by excited claims about what a wonderful discovery this region is.Independently of the string theory problem, I’m personally a skeptic that multiverse...
  • Are you scientifically literate? Take our quiz

    02/22/2012 8:08:53 PM PST · by P.O.E. · 63 replies
    CSM ^ | 12/11/12 | Eoin O'Carroll, Staff
  • Single-atom transistor is ‘end of Moore’s Law’ and ‘beginning of quantum computing’

    02/22/2012 8:43:48 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Kurzweil ^ | 02/22/2012
    A controllable transistor engineered from a single phosphorus atom. The atom, shown here in the center of an image from a computer model, sits in a channel in a silicon crystal. The atomic-sized transistor and wires might allow researchers to control gated qubits of information in future quantum computers. (Credit: Purdue University)The smallest transistor ever built has been created using a single phosphorous atom by an international team of researchers at the University of New South Wales, Purdue University and the University of Melbourne.The latest Intel chip, the “Sandy Bridge,” uses a manufacturing process to place 2.3 billion transistors 32...
  • The Boy Who Played With Fusion

    02/21/2012 9:07:37 AM PST · by justlurking · 68 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 2012-02-14 | Tom Clynes
    Propulsion,” the nine-year-old says as he leads his dad through the gates of the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “I just want to see the propulsion stuff.” A young woman guides their group toward a full-scale replica of the massive Saturn V rocket that brought America to the moon. As they duck under the exhaust nozzles, Kenneth Wilson glances at his awestruck boy and feels his burden beginning to lighten. For a few minutes, at least, someone else will feed his son’s boundless appetite for knowledge. Then Taylor raises his hand, not with a question but an...
  • Researchers Create Single-Atom Transistor

    02/20/2012 11:43:03 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 33 replies · 2+ views
    HardOCP ^ | Monday February 20, 2012 | Steve
    For those of you that haven't seen this yet, Researchers from Purdue, the University of Melbourne and the University of New South Wales have created a working transistor from a single atom. Thanks to Robert for the link. We have fabricated a single-atom transistor in which a single phosphorus atom is positioned between highly doped source and drain leads with a lateral spatial accuracy of ±1 atomic lattice spacing. We demonstrate that we are able to register source, drain and gate contacts to the individual donor atom and observe well-controlled transitions for 0, 1 and 2 electron states, in agreement...
  • Extraordinary Toroidal Vortices

    02/18/2012 4:32:57 PM PST · by gorush · 24 replies · 1+ views
    YouTube ^ | 2-12-10 | Evasius
    Extraordinary and beautiful examples of toroidal vortices produced by dolphins, beluga whales, humpback whales, volcanoes, hydrogen bombs, and man. A toroidal vortex, also called a vortex ring, is a region of rotating fluid moving through the same or different fluid where the flow pattern takes on a toroidal (doughnut) shape. The movement of the fluid is about the poloidal or circular axis of the doughnut, in a twisting vortex motion. Examples of this phenomenon are a smoke ring or a microburst. Vortex rings were first mathematically analysed by the German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz, in his paper of 1867 On...
  • 10-Year-Old Accidentally Creates New Molecule in Science Class

    02/17/2012 3:59:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 1+ views
    Popular Science ^ | February 3, 2012 | Dan Nosowitz & The Mary Sue via Gizmodo
    Clara Lazen is the discoverer of tetranitratoxycarbon, a molecule constructed of, obviously, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon. It's got some interesting possible properties, ranging from use as an explosive to energy storage. Lazen is listed as the co-author of a recent paper on the molecule. But that's not what's so interesting and inspiring about this story. What's so unusual here is that Clara Lazen is a ten-year-old fifth-grader in Kansas City, MO. Kenneth Boehr, Clara's science teacher, handed out the usual ball-and-stick models used to visualize simple molecules to his fifth-grade class. But Clara put the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms...
  • MIT suggests new physical model for condensed matter

    02/09/2012 8:49:53 PM PST · by Kevmo · 39 replies
    Arxiv.org and Vortex-L ^ | Feb 8 2012 | David Ledin
    [Vo]: MIT suggest new physical model for condensed matter The Vorts have some great comments about this theory. http://www.mail-archive.com/vortex-l@eskimo.com/msg63015.html David ledin Tue, 07 Feb 2012 07:40:12 -0800 MIT suggest new physical model for condensed matter to explain many observations of anomalies in condensed matter systems. they named Fleischmann , Pons and Piantelli but not rossi . http://arxiv.org/pdf/1201.4377.pdf ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.mail-archive.com/vortex-l@eskimo.com/msg63024.html Mark Iverson-ZeroPoint Tue, 07 Feb 2012 10:07:44 -0800 The key phrase in the abstract is: "In the resulting model, there appears a new term in which nuclear transitions are coupled to lattice vibrations." I wonder if Hagelstein has been reading...
  • Physicists 'record' magnetic breakthrough

    02/07/2012 10:44:06 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 20 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 2/7/12
    An international team of scientists has demonstrated a revolutionary new way of magnetic recording which will allow information to be processed hundreds of times faster than by current hard drive technology. The researchers found they could record information using only heat - a previously unimaginable scenario. They believe this discovery will not only make future magnetic recording devices faster, but more energy-efficient too. The results of the research, which was led by the University of York's Department of Physics, are reported in the February edition of Nature Communications. York physicist Thomas Ostler said: "Instead of using a magnetic field to...