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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Researchers Discover Natural 3D Counterpart to Graphene.

    01/23/2014 9:50:30 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 21 replies
    Xbitlabs ^ | 01/21/2014 11:50 PM | Anton Shilov
    A collaboration of researchers at the U.S department of energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley national laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three-dimensional topological Dirac semi-metal (3DTDS). This is the first experimental confirmation of 3D Dirac fermions in the interior or bulk of a material, a novel state that was only recently proposed by theorists.
  • Physicists scoop information from Schrodinger's cat box [Quantum Mechanics]

    01/22/2014 2:53:50 PM PST · by ETL · 86 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | January 21, 2014 | Eoin O'Carroll
    In a paper published in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature Communications and titled "Direct measurement of a 27-dimensional orbital-angular-momentum state vector," a team of physicists led by the University of Rochester's Mehul Malik describe how they circumvented a basic principle of uncertainty that requires that some states of a quantum system must be understood poorly if other states are to be understood well. Determining a quantum state, such as the position of an electron or the momentum of a photon, is tricky, to say the least. That's because subatomic particles behave nothing at all like billiard balls,...
  • 2. The Golden Ratio & Fibonacci Numbers: Fact versus Fiction- VIDEO

    01/15/2014 10:37:27 PM PST · by restornu · 16 replies
    Stanford Continuing Studies Program ^ | Dec 11, 2012 | Professor Keith Devlin
    2. The Golden Ratio & Fibonacci Numbers: Fact versus Fiction VIDEO (October 8, 2012) Professor Keith Devlin dives into the topics of the golden ratio and fibonacci numbers. Originally presented in the Stanford Continuing Studies Program
  • A cosmic feast! Milky Way’s mysterious black hole set to gobble up giant gas cloud

    01/14/2014 5:41:54 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 14, 2014 | Ellie Zolfaghasifard
    The Milky Way’s black hole is about to gobble up its first dinner, and astronomers are hoping to have front row seats when it happens. A huge gas cloud, about three times the mass of Earth, is on course to collide with the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy in March. Astronomers expect the gas cloud will swing so close to the black hole that it will heat up to the point where it produces spectacular X-rays.
  • 'There's no Asian way of looking at physics', says Perth teacher Marko Vojkovic (Australia)

    01/10/2014 10:24:25 PM PST · by Dundee · 25 replies
    The Australian ^ | JANUARY 11, 2014 | PAIGE TAYLOR AND MARK COULTAN
    FOR many years, Perth chemistry and physics teacher Marko Vojkovic has been at the front of the fight against what he describes as sociology in the teaching of sciences. He led opposition to Western Australia's ill-fated outcomes-based education curriculum in 2007 and says he recognised some of its telltale signs when teachers got their first glimpses of the national curriculum in 2010. For example, the edict that sustainability, the Asian century and indigenous perspective should be taught as part of physics and chemistry did not sit well with Mr Vojkovic. "I don't think there's a particularly Asian way of looking...
  • 'Time travellers don't exist on the internet': Researchers spend months scanning the web for

    01/04/2014 3:27:05 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 101 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 10:05 EST, 3 January 2014 | Victoria Woollaston
    Researchers from Michigan have scoured websites, search engine results and social networks dating back as far as 1996 in search of people who discussed select events before they happened. They even asked time travellers from the future to tweet using a specific hashtag. Yet despite comprehensive analysis of thousands of records, they were unable to find any evidence time travellers existed.
  • Big-bang-defying giant of astronomy passes away (article)

    01/02/2014 9:11:49 AM PST · by fishtank · 30 replies
    Creation.com ^ | 12-31-13 | John G. Hartnett
    Big-bang-defying giant of astronomy passes away by John G. Hartnett Published: 31 December 2013 (GMT+10) Halton Arp passed away on Saturday morning 28th December 2013 in Munich, Germany. He will be sorely missed by many but not so much by others because of his challenges to the ruling big bang paradigm. With Geoffrey Burbidge and others, Professor Halton Arp was a thorn in the side of those who held to the standard story line of the big bang. In many papers and several books1 he promoted the idea that quasars are born from the nucleus of active galaxies—parent galaxies. In...
  • Hubblecast 70 Explains How Gravitational Lensing Will Help Uncover the Secrets of the Universe

    12/27/2013 3:36:07 PM PST · by lbryce · 13 replies
    SCiTech Daily ^ | December 27, 2013 | Staff
    Original Title:Hubblecast 70 Explains How Gravitational Lensing Will Help Uncover the Secrets of the Universe This eight minute Hubblecast video takes a look at gravitational lensing, explaining how it works and how it can help astronomers uncover the secrets of the Universe.
  • Eerie Rapatronic Nuclear Photographs:Taken Within 10 Nano-Seconds of Detonation

    12/22/2013 1:39:29 PM PST · by lbryce · 58 replies
    Rapatronic Nuclear Photographs-Images Taken Within 10 Nano-Seconds of Nuclear Detonation Click Here:The Camera That Captured the First Millisecond of a Nuclear Bomb Blast Wikipedia:Rapatronic Camera From Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia Nuclear explosion photographed by rapatronic camera less than 1 millisecond after detonation. From the Tumbler-Snapper test series in Nevada, 1952. The fireball is about 20 meters in diameter in this shot. The spikes at the bottom of the fireball are known as the rope trick effect. The rapatronic camera (a contraction of rapid action electronic) is a high-speed camera capable of recording a still image with an exposure time as...
  • Rare Deep Space Light Distortions May Hold Clues to the Universe's Formation and the Big Bang

    12/16/2013 11:44:54 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    universityherald.com ^ | , Dec 16, 2013 02:04 PM EST | Russell Westerholm
    Using the South Pole Telescope, scientists observed patterns known as "B-modes," which occur when a massive object bends a light source, like a lens. These B-modes interacted with matter from very early in the history of the universe, some 400,000 years after the Big Bang. John Carlstrom, the S. Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor in Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, lead the research team. The multi-institutional team published their work Sept. 30 in the journal Physical Review Letters. "The detection of B-mode polarization by South Pole Telescope is a major milestone, a technical achievement that indicates exciting physics...
  • Beam of darkness makes objects invisible from a distance

    12/16/2013 12:31:37 PM PST · by listenhillary · 46 replies
    Wired.co.UK ^ | December 16, 2013 | Olivia Solon
    A research team from the University of Singapore has developed a device that can make objects invisible by bathing them in a beam of darkness. The system takes the conventional approach to optics -- which generally aims to make images as sharp and clear as possible -- and turns it completely on its head. Usually imaging systems focus light into a pattern known as a point spreading function, which consists of a spiked central region of high intensity (the main lobe) surrounded by a concentric region of lower intensity light and a higher intensity lobe after this. In order to...
  • Forget Big Bang-'Rainbow Gravity' theory-universe has NO beginning & stretches out infinitely

    12/15/2013 1:55:43 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | December 11, 2013 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    To think that our universe is 13.8 billion years old is incredible enough. But now researchers are proposing that the universe stretches back into time infinitely with no singular point where it started. The idea is one possible result of something known as ‘rainbow gravity’- a theory that is not widely accepted among physicists, though many say the idea is interesting. The theory’s name comes from a suggestion that gravity's effect on the cosmos is felt differently by varying wavelengths of light, which can be found in the colours of the rainbow. The theory was proposed 10 years ago in...
  • Why Our Universe is Not a Hologram

    12/13/2013 1:24:43 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on December 13, 2013 | Brian Koberlein
    There’s a web post from the Nature website going around entitled “Simulations back up theory that Universe is a hologram.” It’s an interesting concept, but suffice it to say, the universe is not a hologram, certainly not in the way people think of holograms. So what is this “holographic universe” thing? ... From this you get a headline implying that we live in a hologram. On twitter, Ethan Siegel proposed a more sensible headline: “Important idea of string theory shown not to be mathematically inconsistent in one particular way”.
  • Could the universe collapse TODAY? Physicists claim that risk is ‘more likely than ever’…

    12/14/2013 11:01:55 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 62 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10:58 EST, 14 December 2013 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    The universe could be about to collapse, and everything in it—including us—will be compressed into a small, hard ball. The process may already have started somewhere in our cosmos and is eating away at the rest of the universe, according to theoretical physicists. The mind-bending concept has been around for a while, but now researchers in Denmark claim they have proven it is possible with mathematical equations. …
  • New superconductor theory may revolutionize electrical engineering

    12/08/2013 6:38:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 6, 2013 | Bill Steele
    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a frustratingly varied catalog of odd behavior, such as electrons that arrange themselves into stripes or refuse to arrange themselves symmetrically around atoms. Now two physicists propose that such behaviors – and superconductivity itself – can all be traced to a single starting point, and they explain why there are so many variations. This theory might be a step toward new, higher-temperature superconductors that would revolutionize electrical engineering with more efficient motors and generators and lossless power transmission. -snip- Most subatomic particles have a tiny magnetic field – a property physicists call "spin" – and electrical resistance...
  • 4-year-old genius has same IQ as Einstein

    12/14/2013 3:11:11 PM PST · by Star Traveler · 153 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | December 13, 2013 | Amanda Stringfellow
    Sherwyn Sarabi scored an IQ of 160, just like Albert Einstein, Bill Gates, and Stephen Hawking. The British boy is already studying at the level of a 9-year-old and has read over 190 books. A four-year-old boy has stunned psychologists—after intelligence tests revealed him to have the same IQ as Einstein. Sherwyn Sarabi has tested off the scale for intelligence—scoring an IQ of 160—the highest mark on the test. It's the same score that experts believe scientist Einstein had, as well as being identical to that of Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking. Sherwyn from Barnsley, Yorks, started school two years...
  • IBM’s Scientific Breakthrough Could Enable Lower-Cost High-Performance Big Data Systems.

    12/12/2013 9:31:25 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    Xbitlabs ^ | 12/10/2013 11:55 PM | Anton Shilov
    For the first time, scientists at IBM Research have demonstrated a complex quantum mechanical phenomenon known as Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), using a luminescent polymer (plastic) similar to the materials in light emitting displays used in many of today's smartphones. Applications could include energy-efficient lasers and optical switches, critical components for future computer systems processing Big Data Quantum Phenomenon Could Mean Breakthrough for Exascale Systems This discovery has potential applications in developing novel optoelectronic devices including energy-efficient lasers and ultra-fast optical switches – critical components for powering future computer systems to process massive Big Data workloads. The use of a...
  • Update on the universe: Top scientists gather in Dallas to dissect space, matter, time

    12/07/2013 8:34:53 PM PST · by gooblah · 27 replies
    Dallas Morning News ^ | December 7 2013 | Anna Kuchment
    An idea hatched around a Dallas swimming pool 50 years ago has blossomed into one of the world’s most prestigious scientific conferences. Starting Sunday, more than 450 experts on gravity, black holes and the newly discovered Higgs boson — the subject of this year’s Nobel Prize in physics — will gather at the Fairmont Hotel in downtown Dallas to discuss the newest findings and most pressing mysteries in their fields
  • Where Does Gravity Come From?

    12/05/2013 5:18:10 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | December 5, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    The problem is that our understanding of both particle physics and the geometry of gravity is incomplete. “Having gone from basically philosophical understandings of why things fall to mathematical descriptions of how things accelerate down inclines from Galileo, to Kepler’s equations describing planetary motion to Newton’s formulation of the Laws of Physics, to Einstein’s formulations of relativity, we’ve been building and building a more comprehensive view of gravity. But we’re still not complete,” said Dr. Pamela Gay. “We know that there still needs to be some way to unite quantum mechanics and gravity and actually be able to write down...
  • Could Particle ‘Spooky Action’ Define The Nature Of Gravity?

    12/05/2013 5:24:00 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | December 5, 2013 | Elizabeth Howell on
    Sonner then set about to create quarks to see if he could watch what happens when two are entangled with each other. Using an electric field, he was able to catch pairs of particles coming out of a vacuum environment with a few “transient” particles in it. - Once he caught the particles, he mapped them in terms of space-time (four-dimensional space). Note: gravity is believed to be the fifth dimension because it can bend space-time [5th Dimension?], as you can see in these images of galaxies below. - Sonner then tried to figure out what would happen in the...
  • ‘Spooky action’ builds a wormhole between ‘entangled’ particles

    12/04/2013 8:21:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 85 replies
    http://www.washington.edu ^ | December 3, 2013 | Vince Stricherz
    Quantum entanglement, a perplexing phenomenon of quantum mechanics that Albert Einstein once referred to as “spooky action at a distance,” could be even spookier than Einstein perceived. Physicists at the University of Washington and Stony Brook University in New York believe the phenomenon might be intrinsically linked with wormholes, hypothetical features of space-time that in popular science fiction can provide a much-faster-than-light shortcut from one part of the universe to another. But here’s the catch: One couldn’t actually travel, or even communicate, through these wormholes, said Andreas Karch, a UW physics professor. Quantum entanglement occurs when a pair or a...
  • How NASA might build its very first warp drive

    11/29/2013 7:24:42 PM PST · by EveningStar · 115 replies
    io9 ^ | November 26, 2013 | George Dvorsky
    A few months ago, physicist Harold White stunned the aeronautics world when he announced that he and his team at NASA had begun work on the development of a faster-than-light warp drive. His proposed design, an ingenious re-imagining of an Alcubierre Drive, may eventually result in an engine that can transport a spacecraft to the nearest star in a matter of weeks — and all without violating Einstein's law of relativity. We contacted White at NASA and asked him to explain how this real life warp drive could actually work.
  • Faster Than the Speed of Light?

    11/29/2013 7:58:18 PM PST · by Star Traveler · 65 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 22, 2013 | Danny Hakim
    HOUSTON — Beyond the security gate at the Johnson Space Center’s 1960s-era campus here, inside a two-story glass and concrete building with winding corridors, there is a floating laboratory. Harold G. White, a physicist and advanced propulsion engineer at NASA, beckoned toward a table full of equipment there on a recent afternoon: a laser, a camera, some small mirrors, a ring made of ceramic capacitors and a few other objects. He and other NASA engineers have been designing and redesigning these instruments, with the goal of using them to slightly warp the trajectory of a photon, changing the distance it...
  • Novel X-ray device developed

    11/27/2013 1:44:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 11-24-2013 | Provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Using a compact but powerful laser, a research team at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has developed a new way to generate synchrotron X-rays. Although the high quality of synchrotron X-rays make them ideal for research ranging from the structure of matter to advanced medical images, access to the technology has been limited until now. Most traditional synchrotron X-ray devices are gigantic and costly, available only at a few sites around the world. As reported in this week's issue of the top-ranked optics journal Nature Photonics, researchers at UNL's Extreme Light Laboratory developed a novel method to generate research-quality X-rays using...
  • Mathematicians Are Making Major Breakthroughs In The Understanding Of Prime Numbers

    11/23/2013 5:57:05 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 74 replies
    businessinsider.com ^ | Nov. 21, 2013, 3:07 PM | Andy Kiersz
     Most mathematicians have a sense that the twin primes conjecture should be true — the positioning of the prime numbers appear to be more or less random, even though on average the gaps between primes get larger, and if one has an infinitely long list of random odd numbers, we should have an infinite collection of pairs in our list. If at some point, prime numbers are always more than two numbers away from each other, we have a non-random aspect to their distribution that goes against this intuition.
  • Scientists witness massive gamma-ray burst, don't understand it

    11/22/2013 7:53:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | November 21, 2013 | By Pete Spotts, Staff writer
    An exploded star some 3.8 billion light-years away is forcing scientists to overhaul much of what they thought they knew about gamma-ray bursts – intense blasts of radiation triggered, in this case, by a star tens of times more massive than the sun that exhausted its nuclear fuel, exploded, then collapsed to form a black hole. Last April, gamma rays from the blast struck detectors in gamma-ray observatories orbiting Earth, triggering a frenzy of space- and ground-based observations. Many of them fly in the face of explanations researchers have developed during the past 30 years for the processes driving the...
  • Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second

    11/22/2013 4:04:45 PM PST · by BulletBobCo · 26 replies
    Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography, a new type of imaging so fast it visualizes the world one trillion frames per second, so detailed it shows light itself in motion. This technology may someday be used to build cameras that can look “around” corners or see inside the body without X-rays. Photography is about creating images by recording light. At the MIT media lab, professor Ramesh Raskar and his team members have invented a camera that can photograph light itself as it moves at, well, the speed of light.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Heavy Black Hole Jets in 4U1630-47

    11/20/2013 3:05:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What are black hole jets made of? Many black holes in stellar systems are surely surrounded by disks of gas and plasma gravitationally pulled from a close binary star companion. Some of this material, after approaching the black hole, ends up being expelled from the star system in powerful jets emanating from the poles of the spinning black hole. Recent evidence indicates that these jets are composed not only electrons and protons, but also the nuclei of heavy elements such as iron and nickel. The discovery was made in system 4U1630-47 using CSIRO’s Compact Array of radio telescopes in...
  • Scientists proud of dark matter study that turns up nothing

    11/12/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Tailgunner Joe · 28 replies
    upi.com ^ | October 31, 2013 | Caroline Lee
    Scientists at the Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota running the biggest, most sensitive dark matter detector yet released its first round of results yesterday -- and they found nothing. The Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, or LUX, consists of a vat of 368 kilograms of liquid xenon to minus 110 degrees Celsius, surrounded by a tank of water. LUX sits 4,850 feet underground at the old mine, shielded from cosmic rays. An international team of researchers watched for three months to see if any WIMPS -- weakly interacting massive particles -- would pass through the rock and reveal...
  • This quasar should not exist -- and yet it does

    11/09/2013 11:07:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    io9 ^ | November 9th, 2013 | George Dvorsky
    Astronomers from York University in Canada have identified an undocumented type of quasar where gas appears to be getting sucked into a black hole. This may not sound surprising, but current theories say that isn't supposed to happen. Quasars are hyperactive and extremely bright discs of hot gas that surround supermassive black holes. They're also known as galactic nucleuses. The Milky Way has one at its center. All the junk that's rapidly spinning down the drain hole forms a compact disc with a radius that's larger than Earth's orbit around the Sun and a temperature that's hotter than the surface...
  • Wireless device converts 'lost' energy into electric power [Galt's Motor?}

    11/08/2013 10:12:29 AM PST · by Red Badger · 62 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 11-07-2013 | Provided by Duke University
    Using inexpensive materials configured and tuned to capture microwave signals, researchers at Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering have designed a power-harvesting device with efficiency similar to that of modern solar panels. The device wirelessly converts the microwave signal to direct current voltage capable of recharging a cell phone battery or other small electronic device, according to a report appearing in the journal Applied Physics Letters in December 2013. (It is now available online.) It operates on a similar principle to solar panels, which convert light energy into electrical current. But this versatile energy harvester could be tuned to harvest...
  • Quantum Leaps May Solve Impossible Problems

    10/10/2002 11:58:04 AM PDT · by sourcery · 42 replies · 1,057+ views
    NewsFactor Network ^ | October 7, 2002 | Mike Martin
    "It is widely accepted now that, without a doubt, information is physical and quantum physics provides the rules of that physical behavior," George Mason University computer science professor Richard Gomez told NewsFactor. Alan Turing might be considered the "John Forbes Nash of computer science" -- a troubled young Princeton genius who achieved prominence in the 1950s. Turing published one of the top 10 papers in all of 20th-century science -- "On the Computability of Numbers." He killed himself over a conviction for homosexuality at the height of his genius, but since his death, his definition of "computability" has stood untouched...
  • Gravitational Wavelengths Could Crack the Black Hole Code

    10/20/2013 7:35:47 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    guardianlv.com ^ | October 20, 2013. | Jessica Rosslee on
    Okay, but what exactly is a gravitational wave and how could they help us crack the conundrum of the black hole code? A gravitational wave is akin to a ripple in space-time. Albert Einstein predicted that massive bodies changing speed or direction generate these gravitational waves. Picture bodies like a pair of black holes orbiting each other. This then creates a gravitational wave that ripples outwards, like a disturbance in a still pool of water after a leaf has dropped onto its surface and ripples are sent across the surface. Like star-crossed lovers, the black holes of two merging galaxies...
  • Astronomers find clues to decades-long coronal heating mystery [magnetic fields]

    10/19/2013 7:04:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Astronomy ^ | Thursday, October 17, 2013 | Columbia University
    To understand the coronal heating problem, imagine a flame coming out of an ice cube. A similar effect occurs on the surface of the Sun. Nuclear fusion in the center of the Sun heats the solar core to 15 million degrees. Moving away from this furnace, by the time one arrives at the surface of the Sun, the gas has cooled to a relatively refreshing 10,800° Fahrenheit (6,000° Celsius). But the temperature of the gas in the corona, above the solar surface, soars back up to over 1.8 million degrees F (1 million degrees C). What causes this unexpected temperature...
  • Strongest Material Ever Found in Atom-Thick Carbyne Chains

    10/12/2013 12:44:48 PM PDT · by Straight Vermonter · 54 replies
    Science World Report ^ | Oct 11, 2013
    The strongest material ever could be carbyne, atom-thick chains of carbon, according to theoretical calculations by Rice University Physicists. The big question is now if and when anyone can make it in bulk. Carbyne is a chain of carbon atoms held together by either double or alternating single and triple atomic bonds. That makes it a true one-dimensional material, unlike atom-thin sheets of graphene, which have a top and a bottom, or hollow nanotubes, which have an inside and outside. These carbyne nanorods or nanoropes, if they can be made, would have a host of remarkable and useful properties, as...
  • Higgs Theorists Win Physics Nobel in Overtime

    10/10/2013 4:12:36 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 8 October 2013 | Daniel Clery
    Wikimedia Commons, ULBPhysics laureates. Peter Higgs (left) and François Englert. The most eagerly anticipated and potentially controversial Nobel Prize for physics in many years was awarded today—following a nail-biting hourlong delay—exactly according to the expected script: The winners are Peter Higgs and his fellow theorist François Englert for, essentially, predicting the Higgs boson. The winners were much heralded following last year’s discovery of the Higgs by physicists at the CERN particle physics lab near Geneva, Switzerland, using its Large Hadron Collider (LHC).That finding put in place the last piece of the puzzle to complete the standard model of fundamental particles...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- All the Colors of the Sun

    10/02/2013 3:37:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | October 02, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It is still not known why the Sun's light is missing some colors. Here are all the visible colors of the Sun, produced by passing the Sun's light through a prism-like device. The spectrum was created at the McMath-Pierce Solar Observatory and shows, first off, that although our white-appearing Sun emits light of nearly every color, it does indeed appear brightest in yellow-green light. The dark patches in the above spectrum arise from gas at or above the Sun's surface absorbing sunlight emitted below. Since different types of gas absorb different colors of light, it is possible to determine...
  • How to see quantum gravity in Big Bang traces

    09/30/2013 11:28:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 9/27/13 | Ron Cowen
    The cosmic microwave background sky, here mapped by NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, has a polarization, represented by white bars. Future experiments might measure the polarization with enough sensitivity to prove the existence of gravitons, the quanta of gravity. Can a quantum of gravity ever be detected? Two physicists suggest that it can — using the entire Universe as a detector. Researchers think that the gravitational force is transmitted by an elementary particle called the graviton, just as the electromagnetic force is carried by photons. But most of them despair about ever recording individual gravitons. That is because gravity is...
  • Tiny Glass Chip Accelerators Pack the Punch of Huge Mile-Long Instruments

    09/28/2013 1:33:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    latinospost.com ^ | Sep 28, 2013 04:08 PM EDT | Keerthi Chandrashekar
    A new advance in accelerator technology has scientists creating tiny glass chips smaller than a grain of rice that can power electrons up to speeds 10 times faster than present-day conventional technology. Experts from Stanford University and U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator detailed their glass chip accelerator research in a study in the journal Nature. The researchers reveal that they are able to achieve such incredible acceleration in such small distances by using commercial lasers to speed up the electrons instead of microwaves, which are typically used. These new chips offer an unprecedented level of acceleration, clocking...
  • Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation

    09/19/2013 6:56:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 34 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/19/13 | Elizabeth Howell
    Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation Enlarge Artist’s conception of the event horizon of a black hole. Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library Could the famed "Big Bang" theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris. Before getting into their findings, let's just preface this by saying nobody knows anything for sure. Humans obviously weren't around at the time the universe began. The standard theory is that the universe grew from...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artist’s rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated — the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • Odd Peanut Mapped at the Heart of our Galaxy

    09/21/2013 5:55:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Wednesday, September 18, 2013 | ESO
    Two groups of astronomers have used data from ESO telescopes to make the best three-dimensional map yet of the central parts of the Milky Way. They have found that the inner regions take on a peanut-like, or X-shaped, appearance from some angles. This odd shape was mapped by using public data from ESO’s VISTA survey telescope along with measurements of the motions of hundreds of very faint stars in the central bulge. One of the most important and massive parts of the galaxy is the galactic bulge. This huge central cloud of about 10,000 million stars spans thousands of light-years,...
  • Hubble Finds Source of Magellanic Stream

    09/21/2013 10:32:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Thursday, September 19, 2013 | unattributed
    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have solved a 40-year mystery on the origin of the Magellanic Stream, a long ribbon of gas stretching nearly halfway around our Milky Way galaxy. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, are at the head of the gaseous stream. Since the stream's discovery by radio telescopes in the early 1970s, astronomers have wondered whether the gas comes from one or both of the satellite galaxies. New Hubble observations reveal most of the gas was stripped from the Small Magellanic Cloud about two billion years ago, and a...
  • Doomsday? Universe's Fate Depends on True Mass of Tiny Particle

    09/13/2013 10:43:45 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 39 replies
    Space.com ^ | 9/12/13 | Charles Q. Choi
    The universe may end in another 10 billion years or sooner if the heaviest of all the known elementary particles, the top quark, is even heavier than previously thought, researchers say. If the top quark is not heavier than experiments currently suggest, then an even stranger fate may await the cosmos: disembodied brains and virtually anything else could one day randomly materialize into existence. The protons and neutrons that make up the nuclei of atoms are made of elementary particles known as quarks. Protons and neutrons are made up of the lightest and most stable flavors of quark: the up...
  • Black Holes Feed On Quantum Foam, Says Cosmologist

    09/12/2013 6:29:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Nobody knows how the universe’s biggest black holes grow so large. Now one astrophysicist says it’s because they feed on the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime One of the more fascinating astrophysical discoveries in recent years is that almost all galaxies hide supermassive black holes at their cores. Indeed, astronomers believe that galaxies and black holes have a kind of symbiotic relationship so that one cannot form or grow without the other. The evidence comes from observations of galaxies both near and far—almost all contain huge black holes. But that raises an interesting question. We see...
  • Quantum steps towards the Big Bang

    09/03/2013 5:19:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    A new approach to the unification of general theory of relativity and quantum theory Present-day physics cannot describe what happened in the Big Bang. Quantum theory and the theory of relativity fail in this almost infinitely dense and hot primal state of the universe. Only an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity which unifies these two fundamental pillars of physics could provide an insight into how the universe began. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Golm/Potsdam and the Perimeter Institute in Canada have made an important discovery along this route. According to their theory,...
  • 'We may be able to watch dark energy turn on': U-M involved in unprecedented sky survey

    09/03/2013 4:20:57 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    U-Mich ^ | 9/3/13 | Nicole Casal Moore
    ANN ARBOR—Moonless nights outside the Cerro Tololo astronomical observatory in Chile are so dark that when you look down, you can't see your feet. "You can't see your hands," said David Gerdes, physics professor at the University of Michigan. "But you can hold them up to the sky and see a hand-shaped hole with no stars in it. It's really incredible." From this site in the Andes over the next five years, an international team will map one-eighth of the sky in unprecedented detail—aiming to make a time lapse of the past 8 billion years of a slice of the...
  • Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

    08/28/2013 3:33:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/28/13 | Zeeya Merali
    Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behaviour of space and time, but where these entities come from.“Imagine waking up one day and realizing that you actually live inside a computer game,” says Mark Van Raamsdonk, describing what sounds like a pitch for a science-fiction film. But for Van Raamsdonk, a physicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, this scenario is a way to think about reality. If it is true, he says, “everything around us — the whole three-dimensional physical world — is an illusion born from...
  • New Super-Heavy Element 115 Confirmed

    08/27/2013 10:16:35 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | 8-27-13 | Megan Gannon
    Scientists say they've created a handful of atoms of the elusive element 115, which occupies a mysterious corner of the periodic table. The super-heavy element has yet to be officially named, but it is temporarily called ununpentium, roughly based on the Latin and Greek words for the digits in its atomic number, 115.   The atomic number is the number of protons an element contains. The heaviest element commonly found in nature is uranium, which has 92 protons, but scientists can load even more protons into an atomic nucleus and make heavier elements through nuclear fusion reactions. [Wacky Physics: The...
  • Engage! Warp Drive Could Become Reality with Quantum-Thruster Physics

    08/24/2013 8:14:33 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Space.com ^ | 8/21/13 | Miriam Kramer
    DALLAS — Warp-drive technology, a form of "faster than light" travel popularized by TV's "Star Trek," could be bolstered by the physics of quantum thrusters — another science-fiction idea made plausible by modern science. NASA scientists are performing experiments that could help make warp drive a possibility sometime in the future from a lab built for the Apollo program at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. A warp-drive-enabled spacecraft would look like a football with two large rings fully encircling it. The rings would utilize an exotic form of matter to cause space-time to contract in front of and expand...