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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Tiny Glass Chip Accelerators Pack the Punch of Huge Mile-Long Instruments

    09/28/2013 1:33:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    latinospost.com ^ | Sep 28, 2013 04:08 PM EDT | Keerthi Chandrashekar
    A new advance in accelerator technology has scientists creating tiny glass chips smaller than a grain of rice that can power electrons up to speeds 10 times faster than present-day conventional technology. Experts from Stanford University and U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator detailed their glass chip accelerator research in a study in the journal Nature. The researchers reveal that they are able to achieve such incredible acceleration in such small distances by using commercial lasers to speed up the electrons instead of microwaves, which are typically used. These new chips offer an unprecedented level of acceleration, clocking...
  • Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation

    09/19/2013 6:56:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 34 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/19/13 | Elizabeth Howell
    Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation Enlarge Artist’s conception of the event horizon of a black hole. Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library Could the famed "Big Bang" theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris. Before getting into their findings, let's just preface this by saying nobody knows anything for sure. Humans obviously weren't around at the time the universe began. The standard theory is that the universe grew from...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artist’s rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated — the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • Odd Peanut Mapped at the Heart of our Galaxy

    09/21/2013 5:55:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Wednesday, September 18, 2013 | ESO
    Two groups of astronomers have used data from ESO telescopes to make the best three-dimensional map yet of the central parts of the Milky Way. They have found that the inner regions take on a peanut-like, or X-shaped, appearance from some angles. This odd shape was mapped by using public data from ESO’s VISTA survey telescope along with measurements of the motions of hundreds of very faint stars in the central bulge. One of the most important and massive parts of the galaxy is the galactic bulge. This huge central cloud of about 10,000 million stars spans thousands of light-years,...
  • Hubble Finds Source of Magellanic Stream

    09/21/2013 10:32:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Thursday, September 19, 2013 | unattributed
    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have solved a 40-year mystery on the origin of the Magellanic Stream, a long ribbon of gas stretching nearly halfway around our Milky Way galaxy. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, are at the head of the gaseous stream. Since the stream's discovery by radio telescopes in the early 1970s, astronomers have wondered whether the gas comes from one or both of the satellite galaxies. New Hubble observations reveal most of the gas was stripped from the Small Magellanic Cloud about two billion years ago, and a...
  • Doomsday? Universe's Fate Depends on True Mass of Tiny Particle

    09/13/2013 10:43:45 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 39 replies
    Space.com ^ | 9/12/13 | Charles Q. Choi
    The universe may end in another 10 billion years or sooner if the heaviest of all the known elementary particles, the top quark, is even heavier than previously thought, researchers say. If the top quark is not heavier than experiments currently suggest, then an even stranger fate may await the cosmos: disembodied brains and virtually anything else could one day randomly materialize into existence. The protons and neutrons that make up the nuclei of atoms are made of elementary particles known as quarks. Protons and neutrons are made up of the lightest and most stable flavors of quark: the up...
  • Black Holes Feed On Quantum Foam, Says Cosmologist

    09/12/2013 6:29:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Nobody knows how the universe’s biggest black holes grow so large. Now one astrophysicist says it’s because they feed on the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime One of the more fascinating astrophysical discoveries in recent years is that almost all galaxies hide supermassive black holes at their cores. Indeed, astronomers believe that galaxies and black holes have a kind of symbiotic relationship so that one cannot form or grow without the other. The evidence comes from observations of galaxies both near and far—almost all contain huge black holes. But that raises an interesting question. We see...
  • Quantum steps towards the Big Bang

    09/03/2013 5:19:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    A new approach to the unification of general theory of relativity and quantum theory Present-day physics cannot describe what happened in the Big Bang. Quantum theory and the theory of relativity fail in this almost infinitely dense and hot primal state of the universe. Only an all-encompassing theory of quantum gravity which unifies these two fundamental pillars of physics could provide an insight into how the universe began. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Golm/Potsdam and the Perimeter Institute in Canada have made an important discovery along this route. According to their theory,...
  • 'We may be able to watch dark energy turn on': U-M involved in unprecedented sky survey

    09/03/2013 4:20:57 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    U-Mich ^ | 9/3/13 | Nicole Casal Moore
    ANN ARBOR—Moonless nights outside the Cerro Tololo astronomical observatory in Chile are so dark that when you look down, you can't see your feet. "You can't see your hands," said David Gerdes, physics professor at the University of Michigan. "But you can hold them up to the sky and see a hand-shaped hole with no stars in it. It's really incredible." From this site in the Andes over the next five years, an international team will map one-eighth of the sky in unprecedented detail—aiming to make a time lapse of the past 8 billion years of a slice of the...
  • Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

    08/28/2013 3:33:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/28/13 | Zeeya Merali
    Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behaviour of space and time, but where these entities come from.“Imagine waking up one day and realizing that you actually live inside a computer game,” says Mark Van Raamsdonk, describing what sounds like a pitch for a science-fiction film. But for Van Raamsdonk, a physicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, this scenario is a way to think about reality. If it is true, he says, “everything around us — the whole three-dimensional physical world — is an illusion born from...
  • New Super-Heavy Element 115 Confirmed

    08/27/2013 10:16:35 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | 8-27-13 | Megan Gannon
    Scientists say they've created a handful of atoms of the elusive element 115, which occupies a mysterious corner of the periodic table. The super-heavy element has yet to be officially named, but it is temporarily called ununpentium, roughly based on the Latin and Greek words for the digits in its atomic number, 115.   The atomic number is the number of protons an element contains. The heaviest element commonly found in nature is uranium, which has 92 protons, but scientists can load even more protons into an atomic nucleus and make heavier elements through nuclear fusion reactions. [Wacky Physics: The...
  • Engage! Warp Drive Could Become Reality with Quantum-Thruster Physics

    08/24/2013 8:14:33 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    Space.com ^ | 8/21/13 | Miriam Kramer
    DALLAS — Warp-drive technology, a form of "faster than light" travel popularized by TV's "Star Trek," could be bolstered by the physics of quantum thrusters — another science-fiction idea made plausible by modern science. NASA scientists are performing experiments that could help make warp drive a possibility sometime in the future from a lab built for the Apollo program at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. A warp-drive-enabled spacecraft would look like a football with two large rings fully encircling it. The rings would utilize an exotic form of matter to cause space-time to contract in front of and expand...
  • Flicker… A Bright New Method of Measuring Stellar Surface Gravity

    08/22/2013 8:01:58 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 22, 2013 | Tammy Plotner on
    A simple, yet elegant method of measuring the surface gravity of a star has just been discovered. These computations are important because they reveal stellar physical properties and evolutionary state – and that’s not all. The technique works equally well for estimating the size of hundreds of exoplanets. Developed by a team of astronomers and headed by Vanderbilt Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Keivan Stassun, this new technique measures a star’s “flicker”. With an uncertainty ranging from 50 percent to 200 percent, astronomers have been eager to seize on a new way of measuring a star’s surface gravity which will...
  • Physicists levitate tiny diamonds in wild experiment

    08/16/2013 10:07:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    Fox News ^ | August 15, 2013 | Laura Poppick
    In quite an eerie feat, physicists have floated microscopic diamonds in midair using laser beams. Researchers have already used lasers to levitate extremely small particles, such as individual atoms, but this is the first time that the technique has worked on a nanodiamond, which, in this case, measures just 100 nanometers (3.9 x 10-8 inches) across, or more than 1,000 times thinner than a fingernail. In the new study, the physicists from the University of Rochester relied on the fact that a laser beam, which is made up of photons, creates a tiny force that usually can't be felt.....
  • New force potentially stronger than gravity discovered ( With cosmic Dust )

    08/09/2013 12:21:13 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 22 replies
    Vr-zone ^ | July 26, 2013 2:40 am | David Farrell
    The Blackbody force is a newly discovered force that attracts atoms and molecules to hot, opaque objects emitting blackbody radiation. Under certain circumstances, the new force is stronger than gravity.
  • Relativistic Baseball

    08/04/2013 9:27:49 AM PDT · by 1rudeboy · 47 replies
    What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?Let’s set aside the question of how we got the baseball moving that fast. We'll suppose it's a normal pitch, except in the instant the pitcher releases the ball, it magically accelerates to 0.9c. From that point onward, everything proceeds according to normal physics.: The answer turns out to be “a lot of things”, and they all happen very quickly, and it doesn’t end well for the batter (or the pitcher). I sat down with some physics books, a Nolan Ryan action figure, and...
  • Spin rate of black holes pinned down

    08/08/2013 1:35:04 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 12 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/6/13 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Black holes can be described by just two fundamental characteristics: mass and spin. Astronomers have been able to measure the objects’ mass for decades, by looking for gravitational effects on the orbits of nearby stars. But measuring spin, which records the angular momentum of the matter that falls into the holes, has proved troublesome, particularly for the supermassive black holes that lie at the centres of galaxies. No light emanates from the black holes’ spinning event horizons, so astronomers instead look for proxies that emit X-rays, such as the swirling disks of matter that feed into some holes. Such indirect...
  • Scientists to Discuss Universe's Strange Dense Spot Wednesday -

    08/02/2013 1:05:34 AM PDT · by lbryce · 24 replies
    Space.com ^ | July 30, 2013 | Clara Moskowitz
    Original title:Scientists to Discuss Universe's Strange Dense Spot Wednesday: Watch Live You can't watch it live anymore but you can watch the video of the event. This map shows the oldest light in our universe, as detected with the greatest precision yet by the Planck mission. The ancient light, called the cosmic microwave background, was imprinted on the sky when the universe was 370,000 years old. It shows tiny temperature fluctuations that correspond to regions of slightly different densities, representing the seeds of all future structure: the stars and galaxies of today. An odd dense spot in the universe populated...
  • Molten metal solidifies into a new kind of glass

    07/30/2013 6:47:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    07-30-2013 | Provided by Argonne National Laboratory
    (Phys.org) —When a molten material cools quickly, parts of it may have enough time to grow into orderly crystals. But if the cooling rate is too fast for the entire melt to crystallize, the remaining material ends up in a non-crystalline state known as a glass, with atoms caught in place essentially as a frozen liquid. Recently, a group of researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) came across an unexpected reversal of this usual sequence of events. After cooling a molten alloy of aluminum, iron, and silicon, they found that glassy nodules of a non-crystalline solid...
  • Mysterious hum driving people crazy around the world

    07/27/2013 7:05:34 AM PDT · by shove_it · 121 replies
    nbcnews ^ | 26 Jul 2013 | Marc Lallanilla
    It creeps in slowly in the dark of night, and once inside, it almost never goes away. It's known as the Hum, a steady, droning sound that's heard in places as disparate as Taos, N.M.; Bristol, England; and Largs, Scotland. But what causes the Hum, and why it only affects a small percentage of the population in certain areas, remain a mystery, despite a number of scientific investigations...
  • Faster Than the Speed of Light?

    07/23/2013 8:17:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 22, 2013 | Danny Hakim
    HOUSTON — Beyond the security gate at the Johnson Space Center’s 1960s-era campus here, inside a two-story glass and concrete building with winding corridors, there is a floating laboratory. Harold G. White, a physicist and advanced propulsion engineer at NASA, beckoned toward a table full of equipment there on a recent afternoon: a laser, a camera, some small mirrors, a ring made of ceramic capacitors and a few other objects. He and other NASA engineers have been designing and redesigning these instruments, with the goal of using them to slightly warp the trajectory of a photon, changing the distance it...
  • Strange Particles Shape-Shift From One Flavor to Another

    07/23/2013 7:47:43 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    livescience. ^ | July 22, 2013 04:26pm ET | Clara Moskowitz, Senior Writer | -
    Neutrinos come in three flavors — electron, muon and tau — and have been known to change, or oscillate, between certain flavors. Now, for the first time, scientists can definitively say they've discovered muon neutrinos changing into electron neutrinos.
  • Strange Particles Shape-Shift From One Flavor to Another

    07/23/2013 9:35:29 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07/23/2013
    Exotic particles called neutrinos have been caught in the act of shape-shifting, switching from one flavor to another, in a discovery that could help solve the mystery of antimatter. Neutrinos come in three flavors — electron, muon and tau — and have been known to change, or oscillate, between certain flavors. Now, for the first time, scientists can definitively say they've discovered muon neutrinos changing into electron neutrinos. The discovery was made at the T2K neutrino experiment in Japan, where scientists sent a beam of muon neutrinos from the J-PARC laboratory in Tokai Village on the eastern coast of Japan,...
  • Are Neutrinos Their Own Antiparticles?

    07/20/2013 4:35:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 July 2013 | Edwin Cartlidge
    Enlarge Image Shining example. The GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso lab in Italy has all but ruled out earlier claims for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Credit: The University of Tübingen A long-standing controversy among particle physicists looks to be settled—in the less exciting way—thanks to new data from an ultrasensitive particle detector deep underground. Physicists operating the GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) 1400 meters down in Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory say that they see no signs of a hypothesized type of nuclear decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that, were it conclusively observed, would almost certainly merit a Nobel Prize....
  • The Hardest Thing To Find In The Universe?

    07/12/2013 1:41:47 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    NPR ^ | July 12, 2013 | ROBERT KRULWICH
    What is rarer than a shooting star? Rarer than a diamond? Rarer than any metal, any mineral, so rare that if you scan the entire earth, all six million billion billion kilos or 13,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 pounds of our planet, you would find only one ounce of it? What is so rare it has never been seen directly, because if you could get enough of it together, it would self-vaporize from its own radioactive heat? What is this stuff that can't be seen or found? Well, here's a hint. It's sitting modestly in a lower row in the Periodic Table, down on...
  • Jagged graphene edges can slice into cell membranes

    07/11/2013 3:37:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | July 10, 2013 | NA
    Sharp corners and jagged edges on graphene sheets enable them to puncture cell membranes. Researchers from Brown University have shown how tiny graphene microsheets — ultra-thin materials with a number of commercial applications — could be big trouble for human cells. The research shows that sharp corners and jagged protrusions along the edges of graphene sheets can easily pierce cell membranes. After the membrane is pierced, an entire graphene sheet can be pulled inside the cell where it may disrupt normal function. The new insight may be helpful in finding ways to minimize the potential toxicity of graphene, said...
  • Space-Time Loops May Explain Black Holes

    07/11/2013 8:30:09 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 60 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 10 July 2013 Time: 07:00 AM ET | Clara Moskowitz,
    A black hole is created when a huge star runs out of fuel for nuclear fusion and collapses under its own gravity. The star's outer layers are expelled, and its core falls in on itself, with the pull of gravity becoming ever stronger, until what's left is the core's mass condensed into an extremely small area. According to general relativity, this area is a single point of space-time, and the density there is infinitely large — a singularity. But most scientists think singularities don't really exist, that they're just a sign that equations have broken down and fail to adequately...
  • ACS Video Focuses on Ancient Secrets of Alchemy

    07/10/2013 11:00:48 AM PDT · by null and void · 14 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Mon, 07/08/2013 - 4:20pm
    Courtesy of Kirk Zamieroski, American Chemical Society WASHINGTON — The pursuit that obsessed some of the world's greatest geniuses for centuries — alchemy and its quest for the “Philosopher’s Stone” that would transform lead and other base metals into gold — is the topic of a new episode in the American Chemical Society Bytesize Science video series. The video, from the world’s largest scientific society, is at www.BytesizeScience.com. It features Laurence Principe, Ph.D., a noted historian of science and expert on alchemy, which, far from being solely a misguided pseudoscience, helped set the stage for the emergence of modern science....
  • Signs of a Stranger, Deeper Side to Nature’s Building Blocks

    07/09/2013 6:13:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Simon Foundation ^ | July 1, 2013 | Natalie Wolchover
    If each energy field pervading space is thought of as the surface of a pond, and waves and particles are the turbulence on that surface, then the new evidence strengthens the argument that a vibrant, hidden world lies beneath. For decades, the surface-level description of the subatomic world has been sufficient to make accurate calculations about most physical phenomena. But recently, a strange class of matter that defies description by known quantum mechanical methods has drawn physicists into the depths below... Of all the strange forms of matter, cuprates -- copper-containing metals that exhibit a property called high-temperature superconductivity...
  • Cosmic blast mystery solved in neutron star's intense death throes

    07/08/2013 11:01:40 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 7 replies
    The Register ^ | 5th July 2013 | By Rik Myslewski in San Francisco,
    'As if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced' A pair of European astrophysicists believe they've solved the mystery of exceedingly bright, never-repeated flashes of radio waves that come to us from the distant past. The source of those brief, intense flashes can be defined in two ways, depending upon whether you'd prefer to look at the event as a death or a birth. "We suggest that a fast radio burst represents the final signal of a supramassive rotating neutron star that collapses to a black hole due to magnetic braking," write Heino Falcke of...
  • The Mystery of the Intergalactic Radio Bursts

    07/06/2013 4:54:09 AM PDT · by NYer · 35 replies
    Time ^ | July 5, 2013 | Michael D. Lemonick
    It’s a recurring theme in astronomy: observers see a blast of energy out in the cosmos, scratch their heads in confusion for a while, and finally uncover the existence of something entirely surprising and new. It happened with the quasars (now known to be gigantic burps from black holes swallowing hot gas), the pulsars (fast-spinning neutron stars sending out blips of radio noise hundreds of times every second), and even the Big Bang itself, first seen as a stream of microwaves slamming into Earth from all directions, nearly 14 billion years after the event itself.Now it may be happening again....
  • Navigating the Solar System Using Pulsars as GPS

    06/20/2013 5:27:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | June 20, 2013 | Markus Hammonds on
    Just as sailors once used the stars to navigate the sea, space travelers may be able to use the stars to navigate the solar system. Except that this time, the stars we’d use will be dead ones. A specific class of neutron stars known as pulsars, defined by the repeated pulses of radiation they emit. The trick, according to a recent paper, may be to use pulsars as a form of interplanetary – and possibly even interstellar – GPS. Theories and ideas on spacecraft engines are plentiful. Foundations such as Icarus Interstellar keenly advocate the development of new propulsion systems,...
  • Why Some Scientists Embrace the 'Multiverse'

    06/18/2013 1:30:53 AM PDT · by expat1000 · 32 replies
    Jewish World Review ^ | June 18, 2013/ | Denis Prager
    Last week, in Nice, France, I was privileged to participate, along with 30 scholars, mostly scientists and mathematicians, in a conference on the question of whether the universe was designed, or at least fine-tuned, to make life, especially intelligent life. Participants — from Yale, Princeton, Harvard, Berkeley and Columbia among other American and European universities — included believers in G0D, agonistics and atheists.
  • NASA Finds Black Hole Cluster (Unprecedented Cluster)

    06/15/2013 2:30:31 PM PDT · by lbryce · 53 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | June 15, 2013 | Staff
    Title:NASA Finds Black Hole Cluster No matter how old you are, space never stops being cool. That applies doubly to black holes, which is why NASA's latest discovery should be considered totally awesome: using the Chandra X-ray observatory, the agency found an "unprecedented" cluster of black holes in the Andromeda galaxy. How unprecedented? There could be 26 of them in this cluster alone. And these were just the ones that were immediately identifiable, as scientists say there are likely many more that are currently invisible. Said the lead author of the study, "We think it's just the tip of the...
  • Simple theory may explain mysterious dark matter, physicists say

    06/11/2013 4:12:59 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 21 replies
    Science Recorder ^ | 6/11/13 | James Fluere
    One physicist says he likes this theory because of “its simplicity, uniqueness and the fact that it can be tested.”Theoretical physicists at Vanderbilt University contend that a simply theory may explain mysterious dark matter. They propose that most of the matter in the universe may be constructed of particles that have an abnormal, donut-shaped electromagnetic field known as an anapole. According to a news release from Vanderbilt University, Professor Robert Scherrer and post-doctoral fellow Chiu Man Ho carried out an in-depth analysis to determine the validity of this theory. Scherrer points out that he likes this theory because of “its...
  • Artificial 'superatoms' for a new periodic table

    06/09/2013 12:09:23 AM PDT · by neverdem · 20 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 7 June 2013 | Simon Hadlington
    'Superatoms' can be used to make ionic-esque lattices using C60 (black) and metal chalcogenides © Science/AAASCould a new periodic table be on the horizon, populated not by conventional elements but by new ‘superatoms’ designed in the lab? This is the intriguing implication of new work by US chemists, who have made structural analogues of simple ionic compounds such as sodium chloride and cadmium iodide by interacting large molecular clusters instead of individual atoms.The new compounds have unexpected electronic and magnetic properties, opening the prospect for the design of bespoke solid state materials whose properties can be tuned by the...
  • New Science of Cosmography Reveals 3-D Map of the Local Universe (Get your bearings!)

    06/05/2013 2:51:39 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    New Science of Cosmography Reveals 3-D Map of the Local Universe The three-dimensional structure of the local universe may one day become as familiar as our local geography thanks to a new generation of maps that reveal our neighbourhood’s rich complexity and our place within it  The geography of our world is one of the great cultural invariants. There can hardly be the person on the planet who isn’t familiar with the shape of the continents and how they dovetail together or of the Earth is a pale blue sphere orbiting the Sun with seven other planets.Given a three-dimensional model...
  • New Physics Complications Lend Support to Multiverse Hypothesis

    06/03/2013 5:18:54 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    Scientific American ^ | June 1, 2013 | Natalie Wolchover and Simons Science News
    The spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012 confirmed a nearly 50-year-old theory of how elementary particles acquire mass, which enables them to form big structures such as galaxies and humans. “The fact that it was seen more or less where we expected to find it is a triumph for experiment, it’s a triumph for theory, and it’s an indication that physics works,” Arkani-Hamed told the crowd. However, in order for the Higgs boson to make sense with the mass (or equivalent energy) it was determined to have, the LHC needed to find a swarm of other particles,...
  • Scientists put the Sun in our pockets (nuclear fusion using crystals)

    04/27/2005 8:30:27 PM PDT · by FairOpinion · 66 replies · 2,367+ views
    UK Telegraph ^ | Apr. 28, 2005 | Roger Highfield
    A pocket-sized device which can harness fusion, the energy source of the Sun, with the help of crystals no bigger than a sugar cube has been developed by scientists. The "pocket fusion" device, described today in the journal Nature, raises new possibilities in fields as diverse as space propulsion, medical diagnostics, cancer treatment and the hunt for concealed weapons. Now Brian Naranjo, Jim Gimzewski, a professor from Glasgow, and Prof Seth Putterman of the University of California, Los Angeles describe a breathtakingly simple way to fuse atoms with the help of a crystal. They fused atoms of deuterium - heavy...
  • What happens when you collapse an underwater bubble with a soundwave? [Totally amazing!!!]

    05/30/2013 4:23:07 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 40 replies
    Sonoluminescence : How Bubbles Turn Sound into Light
  • 8 Shocking Things We Learned From Stephen Hawking's Book (Should Be 9 Shocking things)

    05/31/2013 2:10:39 PM PDT · by lbryce · 50 replies
    Live Science ^ | January, 2012 | Clara Moskowitz
    From the idea that our universe is one among many, to the revelation that mathematician Pythagoras didn't actually invent the Pythagorean theorem, here are eight shocking things we learned from reading physicist Stephen Hawking's new book, "The Grand Design," written with fellow physicist Leonard Mlodinow of Caltech. The book, covering major questions about the nature and origin of the universe, was released Sept. 7, 2010, by its publisher, Bantam.
  • Theorists weigh in on where to hunt dark matter

    05/26/2013 6:21:28 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 22, 2013 | Lori Ann White
    Enlarge Left panel: Air molecules whiz around at a variety of speeds, and some are very fast. When they collide with both heavy and light elements - for example, xenon (purple) and silicon (orange) - these fast moving particles have enough momentum to affect both nuclei. Right panel: Dark matter particles are moving more slowly and are less able to affect the heavy xenon nucleus. As a result, detectors made from lighter materials like silicon may prove to be more effective at picking up signals of dark matter. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Phys.org) —Now that it looks...
  • Physicists suggest possible existence of other kinds of dark matter

    05/26/2013 4:08:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 51 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 24, 2013 | Bob Yirka
    Credit: Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 211302 (2013) (Phys.org) —A team of Harvard University physicists has proposed the possible existence of a type of dark matter not described by current physics models. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team suggests it's possible that not all dark matter is cold and collision-less. In the visible universe, galaxies form into a disk shape—the Milky Way is a good example. All of its members align roughly along a single plane, this due to the forces of gravity and spin. Objects form into masses which, over time, spread out...
  • Diophantus of Alexandria

    11/18/2003 11:42:36 AM PST · by .cnI redruM · 30 replies · 1,356+ views
    St. Andrews University ^ | 18 Nov 03 | J J O'Connor and E F Robertson
    Diophantus of Alexandria -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Born: about 200 Died: about 284 Previous (Chronologically) Next Biographies Index Previous (Alphabetically) Next Main index -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Diophantus, often known as the 'father of algebra', is best known for his Arithmetica, a work on the solution of algebraic equations and on the theory of numbers. However, essentially nothing is known of his life and there has been much debate regarding the date at which he lived. There are a few limits which can be put on the dates of Diophantus's life. On the one hand Diophantus quotes the definition of a polygonal number from the work...
  • One of the most abstract fields in math finds application in the 'real' world

    05/23/2013 11:23:14 AM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    Science News ^ | May 20, 2013 | Julie Rehmeyer
    Every pure mathematician has experienced that awkward moment when asked, “So what’s your research good for?” There are standard responses: a proud “Nothing!”; an explanation that mathematical research is an art form like, say, Olympic gymnastics (with a much smaller audience); or a stammered response that so much of pure math has ended up finding application that maybe, perhaps, someday, it will turn out to be useful. That last possibility is now proving itself to be dramatically true in the case of category theory, perhaps the most abstract area in all of mathematics. Where math is an abstraction of the...
  • Rare Galaxy Found Furiously Burning Fuel for Stars

    04/25/2013 8:47:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Tuesday, April 23, 2013 | McGill University
    Astronomers have found a galaxy turning gas into stars with almost 100 percent efficiency, a rare phase of galaxy evolution that is the most extreme yet observed. The findings come from the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer in the French Alps, NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. "Galaxies burn gas like a car engine burns fuel. Most galaxies have fairly inefficient engines, meaning they form stars from their stellar fuel tanks far below the maximum theoretical rate," said Jim Geach of McGill University, lead author of a new study appearing in the Astrophysical Journal Letters... The...
  • Kilogram 'losing weight'

    09/13/2007 9:51:22 PM PDT · by Westlander · 37 replies · 695+ views
    www.ananova.com ^ | Thursday 13th September 2007 | Ananova
    The original prototype for the kilogram, stored under lock and key near Paris, appears to be losing weight. The cylinder, which dates back from 1889, seems to have lost 50 micrograms, compared with the average of dozens of copies of the original. Richard Davis, of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sevres, said: "The mystery is that they were all made of the same material, and many were made at the same time and kept under the same conditions, and yet the masses among them are slowly drifting apart." The one in Sevres is the original that the...
  • Shrinking kilogram bewilders physicists

    09/12/2007 2:47:48 PM PDT · by decimon · 107 replies · 2,162+ views
    Associated Press | Sep. 12, 2007 | JAMEY KEATEN
    By JAMEY KEATEN, Associated Press Writer 6 minutes ago PARIS - A kilogram just isn't what it used to be. The 118-year-old cylinder that is the international prototype for the metric mass, kept tightly under lock and key outside Paris, is mysteriously losing weight — if ever so slightly. Physicist Richard Davis of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sevres, southwest of Paris, says the reference kilo appears to have lost 50 micrograms compared with the average of dozens of copies. "The mystery is that they were all made of the same material, and many were made at...
  • Mysteriously Shrinking Proton Continues to Puzzle Physicists

    04/15/2013 11:09:10 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 13 April 2013 Time: 02:35 PM ET | Stephanie Pappas, Senior Writer
    DENVER — The size of a proton, long thought to be well-understood, may remain a mystery for a while longer, according to physicists. Speaking today (April 13) at the April meeting of the American Physical Society, researchers said they need more data to understand why new measurements of proton size don't match old ones. "The discrepancy is rather severe," said Randolf Pohl, a scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics. The question, Pohl and his colleagues said, is whether the explanation is a boring one — someone messed up the measurements — or something that will generate new...
  • A Second Higgs Boson? Physicists Debate New Particle

    04/14/2013 4:33:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 13 April 2013 Time: 11:51 AM ET | Stephanie Pappas,
    The discovery of the Higgs boson is real. But physicists are cagey about whether the new particle they've found will fit their predictions or not. So far, the data suggest that the Higgs, the particle thought to explain how other particles get their mass, is not presenting any surprises, physicists said here today (April 13) at the April meeting of the American Physical Society. But that doesn't mean that it won't in the future — or that there might not be other Higgs bosons lurking out there. "There's a large number of theoretical models that predict, actually, that this Higgs...