Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Potential Dark Matter Discovery a Win for Space Station Science

    04/04/2013 12:52:30 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 21 replies
    AccuWeather ^ | 4/4/13
    Potential Dark Matter Discovery a Win for Space Station Science April 04, 2013; 7:56 AM If nature is kind, the first detection of dark matter might be credited to the International Space Station soon. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment hangs on the side of the International Space Station, July 12, 2011. CREDIT: NASAToday (April 3), researchers announced the first science results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a $2 billion cosmic-ray particle detector mounted on the exterior of the football-field-size International Space Station. The instrument has observed a striking pattern of antimatter particles called positrons that may turn out to...
  • Study Provides New Insights into Origin of Spiral Arms in Disk Galaxies

    04/03/2013 6:41:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Sci-News ^ | April 3, 2013 | unattributed
    U.S. astrophysicists report computer simulations that seem to resolve long-standing questions about the origin and life history of spiral arms in disk galaxies. The origin and fate of the spiral arms in disk galaxies have been debated by astrophysicists for decades, with two theories predominating. One holds that the arms come and go over time. A second and widely held theory is that the material that makes up the arms – stars, gas and dust – is affected by differences in gravity and jams up, like cars at rush hour, sustaining the arms for long periods. The new findings, accepted...
  • LHC upgrade to open up 'new realm of particle physics'

    04/03/2013 4:43:42 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    bbc ^ | 2 April 2013 Last updated at 08:19 ET | Pallab Ghosh
    Engineers have begun a major upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their work should double the energy of what's already the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. This will enable researchers here to move on to their ultimate goal: to find evidence of "new physics", which they believe will lead to a new, more compete theory of sub-atomic physics. The discovery of the Higgs last year was the end of a successful chapter of late 20th Century physics. This was the development of the current theory in the 1960s and 70s called the "Standard Model". This theory says...
  • AAS Decries Impact of Federal Travel Restrictions on Science

    03/27/2013 4:23:24 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 10 replies
    The American Astronomical Society ^ | March 27 2013 | The American Astronomical Society
    The American Astronomical Society (AAS) today expressed deep concern about the U.S. government’s new restrictions on travel and conference attendance for federally funded scientists. Enacted in response to the budget sequestration that went into effect on March 1st, the policies severely limit the ability of many researchers to meet with collaborators and to present their latest results at professional meetings. The leadership of the AAS is especially worried about the restrictions’ deleterious effects on scientific productivity and on scientists’ and students’ careers.The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memo on February 27th offering guidance to federal agencies on...
  • Astronomers discover new kind of supernova

    03/26/2013 3:17:46 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 3/26/13
    Astronomers discover new kind of supernova March 26, 2013 EnlargeThis artist's conception shows the suspected progenitor of a new kind of supernova called Type Iax. Material from a hot, blue helium star at right is funneling toward a carbon/oxygen white dwarf star at left, which is embedded in an accretion disk. In many cases the white dwarf survives the subsequent explosion. Credit: Christine Pulliam (CfA) (Phys.org) —Supernovae were always thought to occur in two main varieties. But a team of astronomers including Carnegie's Wendy Freedman, Mark Phillips and Eric Persson is reporting the discovery of a new type of supernova...
  • New Research Shows the Speed of Light is Variable in Real Space

    03/25/2013 11:27:40 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 20 replies
    Cleveland Leader ^ | March 25, 2013 1:33pm | Julie Kent
    Two new studies to be published in the European Physical Journal D demonstrate that the speed of light is variable in real space. Textbook explanations of the speed of light assume that light travels in a vacuum, but space is not a vacuum. … It is not expected that the small variation in the speed of light which has been found will affect the universally accepted theories of particle physics and quantum mechanics to a large extent. However, the studies are proof that the speed of light may be variable, and shows that the mathematical treatments that have long been...
  • Best Image of Big Bang Afterglow Ever Confirms Standard Cosmology

    03/23/2013 10:44:05 PM PDT · by neverdem · 57 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 21 March 2013 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image No big surprise. Planck has mapped the cosmic microwave background to great precision, but found nothing clearly incompatible with the standard cosmology. Credit: ESA If the universe were ice cream, it would be vanilla. That's the take-home message from researchers working with the European Space Agency's orbiting Planck observatory, who today released the most precise measurements yet of the afterglow of the big bang—the so-called cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The new data from Planck confirm cosmologists' standard model of how the universe sprang into existence and what it's made of. That may disappoint scientists who were...
  • Top Quark Measurements Give ‘God Particle’ New Lease on Life

    06/10/2004 4:00:48 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 23 replies · 382+ views
    University of Rochester ^ | 09 June 2004 | Staff
    Researchers from the University of Rochester have helped measure the elusive top quark with unparalleled precision, and the surprising results affect everything from the Higgs boson, nicknamed the “God particle,” to the makeup of the dark matter that comprises 90 percent of the universe. The scientists developed a new method to analyze data from particle accelerator collisions at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory, which is far more accurate than previous methods and has the potential to change the dynamics of the Standard Model of particle physics. Details of the research are in today’s issue of the journal Nature. “This is a...
  • Hopes fade of Higgs particle opening door to new realms soon

    03/20/2013 1:47:56 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Reuters ^ | Fri Mar 8, 2013 12:28pm EST | Robert Evans
    Scientists’ hopes that last summer’s triumphant trapping of the particle that shaped the post-Big Bang universe would quickly open the way into exotic new realms of physics like string theory and new dimensions have faded this past week. Five days of presentations on the particle, the Higgs boson, at a scientific conference high in the Italian Alps point to it being the last missing piece in a 30-year-old cosmic blueprint and nothing more, physicists following the event say. “The chances are getting slimmer and slimmer that we are going to see something else exciting anytime soon,” said physicist Pauline Gagnon...
  • Voyager 1 has entered a new region of space, sudden changes in cosmic rays indicate

    03/20/2013 2:57:50 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 75 replies
    AGU ^ | 3/20/13
    WASHINGTON – Thirty-five years after its launch, Voyager 1 appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere, according to a new study appearing online today. The heliosphere is a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles, and which is thought to be enclosed, bubble-like, in the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust that pervades the Milky Way galaxy. On August 25, 2012, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft measured drastic changes in radiation levels, more than 11 billion miles from the Sun. Anomalous cosmic rays, which are cosmic rays...
  • Physicist Walks Out of Gender-Segregated Debate At London University [Hosted by Islamic Group!]

    03/18/2013 7:17:16 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 33 replies
    YahooNews ^ | March 18, 2013
    Physicist Walks Out of Gender-Segregated Debate At London University A renowned American physicist created a row at University College London last weekend when he stormed out of a debate hosted by an Islamic group because men, women and couples in the audience were segregated. The physicist, Lawrence Krauss, is a professor at Arizona State University. Krauss is a noted atheist who served on President Barack Obama’s science policy committee during the 2008 presidential campaign. The debate, sponsored by the Islamic Education and Research Academy, was entitled: “Islam or Atheism: Which Makes More Sense?” A YouTube clip posted by Stand for...
  • Physicists Discover a Whopping 13 New Solutions to Three-Body Problem

    03/09/2013 9:25:20 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 35 replies
    Science Now ^ | 3/8/13 | Jon Cartwright
    It's the sort of abstract puzzle that keeps a scientist awake at night: Can you predict how three objects will orbit each other in a repeating pattern? In the 300 years since this "three-body problem" was first recognized, just three families of solutions have been found. Now, two physicists have discovered 13 new families. It's quite a feat in mathematical physics, and it could conceivably help astrophysicists understand new planetary systems. The trove of new solutions has researchers jazzed. "I love these things," says Robert Vanderbei a mathematician at Princeton University who was not involved in the work. He says...
  • Herschel gets to the bottom of black-hole jets

    03/15/2013 9:41:44 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    European Space Agency. ^ | 12 Mar 2013 | Stéphane Corbel & Göran Pilbratt
    Astronomers using ESA's Herschel space observatory have detected emission from the base of black-hole jets for the first time. While studying the black-hole binary system GX 339-4 in a multi-wavelength observation campaign, they noticed changes in the source's X-ray and radio emissions signalling the onset of powerful jets being released from the black hole's vicinity. This prompted the astronomers to observe the source at far-infrared wavelengths with Herschel. As the first observation of emission from jets in a black-hole binary system at these wavelengths, the data have allowed the astronomers to probe the jets down to their base, where the...
  • In praise of … Higgs boson

    03/15/2013 1:00:02 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 24 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Thursday 14 March 2013 | Editorial
    The vanishingly small speck whose spin has been confirmed as being Higgs-like ought to be regarded with aweImage removed,...see article website Traces of proton collisions at Cern during the search for the Higgs boson. Photograph: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty ImagesIt is a subatomic point where hard science meets myth and mystery, so much about the Higgs boson gets mangled in the telling. It is not, as is sometimes claimed, the sole source of matter's heft – Einstein taught us that mass and energy are two sides of the same coin, so there is (ahem) no such massive hole for a tiny particle...
  • On Pi Day [March 14, 2013], finding strength in numbers

    03/14/2013 5:11:50 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 43 replies
    CNN ^ | March 14, 2013 | Elizabeth Landau,
    In Daniel Tammet's mind, three is a dotted green crescent moon shape, one is a sort of white sunburst and four is a blue boomerang. Every number has a distinct color and shape, making the number pi, which begins with 3.14, unfold like a beautiful poem. For math enthusiasts around the world, March 14 (3-14) is Pi Day, honoring the number pi, which is the ratio of circumference to diameter of a circle. On Thursday, Tammet is promoting France's first Pi Day celebration at the Palace of Discovery science museum in Paris. Tammet's relationship to this number is special: At...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Spin up of a Supermassive Black Hole

    03/12/2013 7:07:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | March 12, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How fast can a black hole spin? If any object made of regular matter spins too fast -- it breaks apart. But a black hole might not be able to break apart -- and its maximum spin rate is really unknown. Theorists usually model rapidly rotating black holes with the Kerr solution to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, which predicts several amazing and unusual things. Perhaps its most easily testable prediction, though, is that matter entering a maximally rotating black hole should be last seen orbiting at near the speed of light, as seen from far away. This prediction...
  • The ALMA telescope has just made its first major discovery

    03/13/2013 3:31:48 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    IO9 ^ | Today 2:07pm | George Dvorsky
    Today is inauguration day for ALMA, the massive telescopic array that’s still under construction in Chile’s Atacama Desert. But just because it’s not finished doesn’t mean astronomers haven’t been using it. The $1.5 billion telescope has just peered into the deepest realms of the universe, revealing some of the most distant star-spawning galaxies ever discovered....
  • Chinese Physicists Measure Speed of “Spooky Action At a Distance”

    03/07/2013 11:41:49 PM PST · by Bobalu · 48 replies
    Physics arXiv Blog ^ | March 7, 2013 | Physics arXiv Blog
    Einstein railed against the possibility of spooky action at a distance because it violates relativity. Now Chinese physicists have clocked it traveling more than four orders of magnitude faster than light
  • Quantum theory is wrong.

    03/07/2013 5:44:05 AM PST · by ABrit · 62 replies
    A word in your ear ^ | March 7th 2013 | Mark
    Particles do not retain "information", don't have "knowledge". It is not that the act of observation that alters reality. In fact the physical nature of the "observation" small though it may be is sufficient to alter the metrics of sub atomic particles.
  • Magnifying the Universe: Move From Atoms to Galaxies in HD

    03/08/2013 11:24:27 AM PST · by Dysart · 22 replies
    Open Culture (via Number Sleuth) ^ | 3-8-13 | Number Sleuth
    Before you do anything else, click on the image above and then move little slider (along the bottom of the image) from left to right. Now watch the universe fly by, going from macro to micro. Pretty cool, no? Now read on: This dynamic infographic comes to us via Number Sleuth, who describes their wonderful creation as follows: This interactive infographic accurately illustrates the scale of over 100 items within the observable universe ranging from galaxies to insects, nebulae and stars to molecules and atoms. Numerous hot points along the zoom slider allow for direct access to planets, animals, the...