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  • Mitsubishi Reports Toyota Replication [of Iwamura's LENR transmutation of elements]

    12/12/2012 4:54:03 PM PST · by TXnMA · 166 replies
    New Energy Times ^ | December 7, 2012 | Steve Krivit
    Dec. 7, 2012 – By Steven B. Krivit – Researchers from Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories performed an independent replication of a Mitsubishi low-energy nuclear reaction transmutation experiment, according to a physicist from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries speaking at the American Nuclear Society LENR session on Nov. 14 in San Diego, Calif. The physicist, Yasuhiro Iwamura, told the ANS audience that the Toyota researchers confirmed that nuclear changes from one element to another took place without the use of high-energy nuclear physics. Most scientists who have not followed this field closely consider such profound claims inconceivable. Toyota used a LENR...
  • Cold Fusion Pioneer says LENR is not Fusion

    12/03/2012 11:44:28 PM PST · by Kevmo · 39 replies
    Cold Fusion News ^ | Nov 20, 2012 | http://coldfusion3.com/
    Cold Fusion Pioneer says LENR is not Fusion Published November 20, 2012. | By jennifer. The man who invented the term “cold fusion” now says that the effect popularly described as cold fusion or low energy nuclear reaction (LENR) is not fusion. Professor Emeritus Steven E. Jones told Sterling D. Allan of Pure Energy Systems that he’s not sure what to call the effect. Jones is the man who came up with the term cold fusion in a Scientific American article in July 1987. Jones was actually researching the phenomenon two full years before Pons and Fleischmann put it on...
  • Caltech engineers invent light-focusing device

    12/13/2012 10:22:21 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 7, 2012 | NA
    EnlargeEngineers at Caltech have created a device (illustrated here) that can focus light into a point just a few nanometers (billionths of a meter) across -- an achievement they say may lead to next-generation applications in computing, communications, and imaging. Credit: Young-Hee Lee (Phys.org)—As technology advances, it tends to shrink. From cell phones to laptops—powered by increasingly faster and tinier processors—everything is getting thinner and sleeker. And now light beams are getting smaller, too. Engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a device that can focus light into a point just a few nanometers (billionths of a...
  • Researchers discover fastest light-driven process

    12/14/2012 3:04:56 PM PST · by neverdem · 13 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 5, 2012 | NA
    A discovery that promises transistors – the fundamental part of all modern electronics – controlled by laser pulses that will be 10,000 faster than today's fastest transistors has been made by a Georgia State University professor and international researchers. Professor of Physics Mark Stockman worked with Professor Vadym Apalkov of Georgia State and a group led by Ferenc Krausz at the prestigious Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics and other well-known German institutions.There are three basic types of solids: metals, semiconductors, used in today's transistors, and insulators – also called dielectrics.Dielectrics do not conduct electricity and get damaged or break...
  • Cold Fusion and the Energy Crisis: to be or not to be?

    12/13/2012 1:48:55 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    Foreign Policy Journal ^ | November 30, 2012 | Dr. Stoyan Sarg
    While the year 2011 will be remembered for the remarkable progress in cold fusion achieved in Italy and more particularly by the E-cat reactors of Andrea Rossi, the year 2012 will be remembered for the slow progress of its recognition by the mainstream establishments. Cold fusion, known also as LENR, is a new and safer type of nuclear energy that will rival the currently used unsafe nuclear power. Its advantages are unparalleled: a lack of radioactive waste and byproducts that could be used for a weapon; abundance of fuel (nickel) without the need for mining of radioactive uranium with the...
  • Physicists extend entanglement in Einstein experiment

    12/14/2012 6:11:59 PM PST · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Phys.org | December 6, 2012 by | Lisa Zyga
    Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. Here's the link.
  • New Species of Galaxy Discovered Glowing from Light of Monster Black Holes

    12/11/2012 8:09:58 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 12/5/12
    A new galaxy class has been identified using observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), the Gemini South telescope, and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Nicknamed “green bean galaxies” because of their unusual appearance, these galaxies glow in the intense light emitted from the surroundings of monster black holes and are amongst the rarest objects in the Universe. Many galaxies have a giant black hole at their center that causes the gas around it to glow. However, in the case of green bean galaxies, the entire galaxy is glowing, not just the centre. These new observations reveal the largest and brightest...
  • New Chemical Reaction Could Explain How Stars Form, Evolve, and Eventually Die

    12/08/2012 8:44:00 PM PST · by neverdem · 16 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | December 7, 2012 | NA
    University of North Dakota scientist Mark Hoffmann's version of Star Search goes a long way -- a very long way -- out into the universe. Hoffmann, a computational chemist, and his colleagues Tryve Helgaker, a well-known Norwegian scientist, and co-authors E.I. Tellgren and K. Lange, also working in Norway, have discovered a molecular-level interaction that science had puzzled over for decades but had never seen. That discovery, it turns out, may redefine how science views chemical compound formation. It also answers questions about what goes on in places like white dwarfs, the super dense cores of stars nearing the end...
  • Nanoparticle blast caught on film - Combustion could help to make minuscule matter.

    12/08/2012 9:09:00 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 05 December 2012 | Eugenie Samuel Reich
    Explosive debut A droplet of xylene containing a tin compound is ignited, and then explodes to produce uniform nanoparticles (courtesy: Ch. Rosebrock & L. Mädler, Univ. Bremen). It was a pretty explosive premiere for a movie about a chemical reaction. A microscopic droplet drifted across the screen — almost in homage to the panning gun barrel of the James Bond movies — and then: bang! Scientists watching the scene last week at a meeting of the Materials Research Society (MRS) in Boston, Massachusetts, were gripped, because the death of the droplet was also an act of creation. Lutz Mädler, a...
  • Bid to Preserve Manhattan Project Sites in a Park Stirs Debate

    12/08/2012 3:03:19 PM PST · by neverdem · 22 replies
    NY Times ^ | December 3, 2012 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    <p>A plan now before Congress would create a national park spread over three states to protect the aging remnants of the atomic bomb project from World War II, including an isolated cabin where grim findings threw the secretive effort into a panic.</p>
  • Enrico Fermi’s Anniversary (World's first nuclear reactor was built in the middle of Chicago)

    12/06/2012 2:00:50 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    National Review ^ | 12/06/2012 | Robert Zubrin
    This week marks the 70th anniversary of a turning point in human history. It was on December 2, 1942, that Enrico Fermi ordered the control rods pulled from the nuclear reactor he had built under the west stands of the University of Chicago’s Stagg Field stadium, thereby initiating the first artificial sustained-fission reaction in human history. A cryptic message flashed the electrifying news back to Washington. “The Italian navigator has landed in the new world.” The consequences of Fermi’s success were profound. Within two and a half years, the Manhattan Project advanced to build both uranium-isotope-separation and plutonium-manufacturing facilities on...
  • Fermi’s Anniversary: Seventy years ago, a scientific breakthrough revolutionized nuclear technology.

    12/05/2012 2:28:39 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies
    National Review Online ^ | December 5, 2012 | Robert Zubrin
    Enrico Fermi This week marks the 70th anniversary of a turning point in human history.It was on December 2, 1942, that Enrico Fermi ordered the control rods pulled from the nuclear reactor he had built under the west stands of the University of Chicago’s Stagg Field stadium, thereby initiating the first artificial sustained-fission reaction in human history. A cryptic message flashed the electrifying news back to Washington. “The Italian navigator has landed in the new world.”The consequences of Fermi’s success were profound. Within two and a half years, the Manhattan Project advanced to build both uranium-isotope-separation and plutonium-manufacturing facilities on...
  • Galaxy Grande: Milky Way May Be More Massive Than Thought

    12/03/2012 10:02:45 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 12/3/12 | Ken Croswell
    Hubble observations of a speedy galaxy weigh on the Milky Way and indicate that our galaxy is at least a trillion times as massive as the sunMilky Way GREAT GALAXY: The Milky Way maintains a fleet of some two dozen satellite galaxies whose motions help reveal its mass. Image: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team Although scientists know the masses of the sun and Earth, it's a different story for the galaxy. Mass estimates range widely: At the low end, some studies find that the galaxy is several hundred billion times as massive as the sun whereas the largest values exceed two trillion...
  • New experiments challenge fundamental understanding of electromagnetism

    12/03/2012 2:29:16 PM PST · by neverdem · 45 replies
    Phys.org ^ | November 28, 2012 | NA
    A cornerstone of physics may require a rethink if findings at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are confirmed. Recent experiments suggest that the most rigorous predictions based on the fundamental theory of electromagnetism—one of the four fundamental forces in the universe, and harnessed in all electronic devices—may not accurately account for the behavior of atoms in exotic, highly charged states. The theory in question is known as quantum electrodynamics, or QED, which physicists have held in high regard for decades because of its excellent track record describing electromagnetism's effects on matter. In particular, QED has been especially...
  • December 2, 1942: Enrico Fermi and atomic Chicago

    12/01/2012 8:05:44 PM PST · by smokingfrog · 4 replies
    WBEZ91.5 ^ | 12-2-11 | John Schmidt
    The story begins with a letter from Albert Einstein to Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. The celebrated physicist warned the president that Nazi Germany was developing the makings of an atomic bomb. Roosevelt knew what would happen if Hitler got such a weapon. The president ordered a massive secret project to make sure the U.S. beat him to it. Scientists from all over the country were enlisted in the effort. Early in 1942 Enrico Fermi and a team of physicists gathered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory. Their goal was to develop a self-sustaining nuclear pile. This was the...
  • Chicago Pile 70 years tomorrow Dec 2.

    12/01/2012 10:18:37 AM PST · by AdmSmith · 33 replies
    Argonne National Lab ^ | 9 jul 2012 | Staff
    On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction.
  • Make or break: the laws of motion

    11/30/2012 6:10:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 28 November 2012 | Philip Ball
    Calling chemistry ‘molecular architecture’ is even more apt than it might seem. There was a time when architectural engineering was largely about getting buildings to stay up: to withstand the stresses and forces that act on them. But today’s architecture is responsive, mutable, adaptive and dynamic. Likewise, chemistry could appear in its first flush to be about making bonds that will last, but today’s chemistry is just as concerned with breaking as it is with making. The dynamic role of weak hydrogen bonding, for example, was illustrated with the discovery of DNA’s structure: to template replication and transcription, the molecule...
  • As Supersymmetry Fails Tests, Physicists Seek New Ideas

    11/29/2012 3:10:46 PM PST · by neverdem · 32 replies
    Simons Science News ^ | November 20, 2012 | Natalie Wolchover
    No hints of “new physics” beyond the predictions of the Standard Model have turned up in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, a 17-mile circular tunnel at CERN Laboratory in Switzerland that slams protons together at high energies. (Photo: CERN) As a young theorist in Moscow in 1982, Mikhail Shifman became enthralled with an elegant new theory called supersymmetry that attempted to incorporate the known elementary particles into a more complete inventory of the universe.“My papers from that time really radiate enthusiasm,” said Shifman, now a 63-year-old professor at the University of Minnesota. Over the decades, he and thousands of...
  • Big Bang bashing boffins ‘Big Bounce’ back to BIRTH OF TIME

    11/30/2012 11:27:15 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 51 replies
    The Register ^ | 29th November 2012 23:54 GMT | By Richard Chirgwin
    A group of Penn State physicists says the universe we now see could have arisen from a "Big Bounce" rather than a Big Bang. The new work by Penn State, led by professor Abhay Ashtekar, director of the Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, proposes ways to apply quantum physics "further back in time than ever before – right back to the beginning," the university says in a release. We have a pretty good idea of the large-scale structures of the universe when it was only a few hundred thousand years old. That comes from studying the fingerprint of the...
  • Astronomers find biggest black hole, 17 BILLION times the size of Sun

    11/28/2012 2:29:09 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 30 replies
    The Register ^ | 28th November 2012 21:21 GMT | Iain Thomson in San Francisco
    A team at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has found the largest recorded black hole, one that swallows an unprecedented amount of its home galaxy, potentially requiring a rethink in our understanding of galactic formation. The huge hole has been spotted in the heart of the disk system NGC 1277, a smallish galaxy about 10 per cent of the size of the Milky Way and situated around 220 million light-years from Earth, in the constellation Perseus. Almost all galaxies have black holes at their centers, but they typically only take up around 0.1 per cent of the total galactic...