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Keyword: stemcells

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  • Can heart attack damage be reversed?

    07/12/2014 8:51:48 PM PDT · by Innovative · 31 replies
    CNN ^ | July 12, 2014 | Caleb Hellerman
    An hour's drive to the southeast, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Dr. Eduardo Marban has recently launched an experiment to help patients like Karpman. Marban led one of the earlier stem cell trials, using cells taken by biopsy from the patient's own heart. The cells were multiplied in a laboratory for two to three weeks and then reinfused through a catheter. At the time, says Marban, it was thought that the stem cells themselves turned into new heart muscle and blood vessels. "In fact, the more we learned, the more we realized that that's not what these cells...
  • Researchers regrow corneas using adult human stem cells

    07/03/2014 7:40:26 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 5 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 02, 2014 | Loren Grush
    Boston researchers have successfully regrown human corneal tissue—a feat that could potentially restore vision in the blind. The achievement also marks one of the first times that scientists have constructed tissue using adult-derived human stem cells. In a new study published in the journal Nature, researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the VA Boston Healthcare System detailed their groundbreaking research. According to the paper, the key to the study’s success revolves around a molecule known as ABCB5, which serves as a biomarker for previously elusive limbal stem cells. Residing in the...
  • Fasting for three days can regenerate entire immune system, study finds

    06/06/2014 4:04:55 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 70 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7:51PM BST 05 Jun 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    Fasting for as little as three days can regenerate the entire immune system, even in the elderly, scientists have found in a breakthrough described as “remarkable”. Although fasting diets have been criticized by nutritionists for being unhealthy, new research suggests starving the body kick-starts stem cells into producing new white blood cells, which fight off infection. Scientists at the University of Southern California say the discovery could be particularly beneficial for people suffering from damaged immune systems, such as cancer patients on chemotherapy. […] Scientists found that prolonged fasting also reduced the enzyme PKA, which is linked to aging and...
  • Tooth decay could be lasered away with five-minute blast

    05/29/2014 12:01:51 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10:37AM BST 29 May 2014 | Alice Philipson
    The agony of root canal surgery and the need for tooth fillings could soon be ended after scientists discovered a way to make a rotting tooth repair itself using a laser beam. Just five minutes under a laser was enough to kickstart the healing process inside the mouth, the researchers found. The new technique—although only tested on rats so far—could prevent the need for fillings for some types of decay, and may eventually replace painful and expensive root canal treatment. Researchers, which included experts from the US government’s dental research team, found a blast of intense light from a laser...
  • [European] Commission rejects citizens’ campaign to ban stem cell funding

    05/29/2014 4:58:28 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 1 replies
    EU Observer ^ | 29.05.14 @ 09:16 | Benjamin Fox
    The European Commission has dismissed a campaign to scrap funding for stem cell research and reproductive health services. The demand was made by the “One of Us” campaign, the second citizens’ initiative to reach the 1 million signatures required under the Lisbon treaty. The campaign, which has been backed by Popes Francis and Benedict, the current and former heads of the Catholic church, and backed by a number of religious organizations, sought to ban the use of EU funds for research, foreign aid programs and public health activities that are linked to the destruction of human embryos. …
  • Japanese institute says "breakthrough" stem cell study was fabricated

    04/01/2014 4:20:40 PM PDT · by mojito · 2 replies
    CBS News ^ | 4/1/2014 | Unattributed
    TOKYO -- Data in a widely lauded stem-cell research paper was falsified, a Japanese government-funded laboratory said Tuesday, as the lead researcher accused of the malpractice denied any wrongdoing. The research from the Riken Center for Development Biology in Kobe, western Japan, had been hailed as a possible breakthrough for growing tissue to treat illnesses such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease using a simple lab procedure. But significant discrepancies in the "game-changing" research published in January in scientific journal Nature led a panel of scientists at Riken to conclude they stemmed from falsified data. They said researcher Haruko Obokata, the...
  • Bioprinting cartilage into people is doctor's goal

    02/08/2014 4:46:42 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    The San Diego Union-Tribune ^ | February 7, 2014 | Bradley J. Fikes
    Researcher Darryl D'Lima of Scripps Clinic with his "bioprinter" adapted from an HP inkjet printer that can produce cartilage. California’s stem cell agency, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, awarded him $3.1 million to research the use of embryonic stem cells and artificial embryonic stem cells to generate replacement cartilage. Stem cell researcher Jeanne Loring has collaborated with D’Lima on growing cartilage from stem cells. She described him as “unique” in the ability to incorporate many disciples of science and medicine. “He’s the only orthopedic surgeon I know who has the bandwidth to start thinking way outside the box,” said...
  • Stem cells made quickly in acid in possible game-changing technique

    01/29/2014 8:59:15 AM PST · by facedown · 3 replies
    CBSNews.com ^ | January 29, 2014 | CBS/AP
    NEW YORK -- Scientists are reporting a stem cell breakthrough using a simple lab technique that may create reprogrammed cells after dipping them in acid for under 30 minutes. The technique turned ordinary cells from mice into stem cells, according to the surprising new study that hints at a possible new way to grow tissue for treating illnesses like diabetes and Parkinson's disease.
  • Bones repaired with stroke of a pen

    12/27/2013 5:17:05 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The Australian ^ | December 28, 2013 | Murad Ahmed
    SURGEONS may soon be able to "draw" new bone, skin and muscle on to patients after scientists created a pen-like device that can apply human cells directly to car-crash victims and others with serious injuries. Australian scientists have made a "BioPen", which allows doctors to apply stem cells and growth factors on to damaged and diseased bones. The machine works in a similar way to a 3D printer, building up the materials required to heal a bone. Experts have said it could improve bone reconstruction surgery. The device was created at the University of Wollongong and St Vincent's Hospital in...
  • Kidney grown from [adult] stem cells by Australian scientists [skin stem cells]

    12/16/2013 1:18:13 PM PST · by topher · 11 replies
    The UK Telegraph ^ | 10:28AM GMT 16 Dec 2013 | By Jonathan Pearlman
    Scientists in Australia have grown the world's first kidney from stem cells – a tiny organ which could eventually help to reduce the wait for transplants. The breakthrough, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, followed years of research and involved the transformation of human skin cells into an organoid – a functioning "mini-kidney" with a width of only a few millimetres.
  • Adult Stem Cells Imitate Human Brain, Are Hope for Neurological Disorders

    10/31/2013 1:02:39 PM PDT · by GonzoII · 14 replies
    Charlotte Lozier Institute ^ | September 3, 2013 | Nora Sullivan
    Adult Stem Cells Imitate Human Brain, Are Hope for Neurological Disorders Charlotte Lozier Institute on September 3, 2013 in Science & Medicine - No comments By Nora SullivanA study published last week has shown that adult stem cells derived from ethical sources can be used to create living tissues that imitate the developing human brain.  In their findings, published in the science journal Nature, researchers asserted that, by using human stem cells derived from skin cells, they were able to assemble brain-like pieces of living tissue.  These stem cells could prove to be an invaluable resource for the study and...
  • Adult Stem Cell Research Has Defeated Embryonic Stem Cells for Funding Priorities

    10/31/2013 12:28:31 PM PDT · by GonzoII · 5 replies
    Life News.com ^ | 10/31/13 | Mallory Quigley
    Adult Stem Cell Research Has Defeated Embryonic Stem Cells for Funding Priorities by Mallory Quigley | LifeNews.com | 10/31/13 11:53 AMA new report released today by the Charlotte Lozier Institute (CLI) analyzes funding for stem cell research in California and Maryland to conclude that funding trends reflect the scientific community’s  view that the best hope for disease treatment and therapies lies with morally unproblematic, non-embryonic stem cells."For decades, stem cells obtained by destroying unique, living human beings were heralded for their potential ability to cure numerous diseases and conditions.  However, while funding for this morally objectionable research initially boomed, efficacious...
  • Government Overreach Threatens Lives - Will the FDA shut down vital stem-cell treatments?

    10/02/2013 10:37:43 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Hoover Institution ^ | October 1, 2013 | Richard A. Epstein
    Throughout its long history, the Federal Food and Drug Administration has insisted that its mission is “protecting and promoting your health.” Take that your seriously. In area after area, the record suggests that the paternalist FDA fails you in its announced purpose. Far from protecting “your health,” the FDA prevents you from making the informed decisions to preserve and promote your own health. All too often, the FDA lacks both the judgment and technical expertise to decide which treatments ordinary people may choose to undergo and which they must turn aside. To take one example, the FDA’s critics have bemoaned...
  • Stem cells: Living adult tissue transformed back into embryo state

    09/12/2013 12:22:25 AM PDT · by Lonely Bull · 6 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11 September 2013 | James Gallagher
    The living tissue inside an animal has been regressed back into an embryonic state for the first time, Spanish researchers say. They believe it could lead to new ways of repairing the body, for example after a heart attack. However, the study published in the journal Nature, showed the technique led to tumours forming in mice. Stem cell experts said it was a "cool" study, but would need to be much more controlled before leading to therapies.
  • Madison diocese bans school trips to research center

    09/09/2013 8:53:06 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 5 replies
    MADISON — Children who attend Catholic schools within the Madison diocese won’t be taking any more field trips to a renowned research center because it conducts research using embryonic stem cells. The Madison Catholic Diocese, which announced its decision in a letter Thursday, said the research at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery runs counter to Catholic teachings on the sanctity of human life, the Wisconsin State Journal reported. Any plans to have students visit the center “should be halted immediately, and alternative, morally acceptable means of meeting the educational objectives should be utilized,” wrote Michael Lancaster, the superintendent of Catholic...
  • Tiny human brains grown by scientists (Video link)

    09/02/2013 5:19:21 PM PDT · by workerbee · 29 replies
    MSN ^ | 9/2/13
    In a breakthrough one researcher calls 'mindboggling,' miniature brains are now being grown in labs for study.
  • Miniature 'human brain' grown in lab

    08/29/2013 5:08:43 AM PDT · by NYer · 33 replies
    BBC ^ | August 28, 2013 | James Gallagher
    Cross-section of miniature human brains termed cerebral organoids Miniature "human brains" have been grown in a lab in a feat scientists hope will transform the understanding of neurological disorders.The pea-sized structures reached the same level of development as in a nine-week-old foetus, but are incapable of thought.The study, published in the journal Nature, has already been used to gain insight into rare diseases.Neuroscientists have described the findings as astounding and fascinating. The human brain is one of the most complicated structures in the universe. Scientists at Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have now reproduced some...
  • Stem cells mimic human brain

    08/28/2013 7:01:48 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Nature News ^ | 28 August 2013 | Helen Shen
    'Mini-brains' help researchers to study neurological diseases in living human tissue. With the right mix of nutrients and a little bit of coaxing, human stem cells derived from skin can assemble spontaneously into brain-like chunks of tissue. Researchers provide the first description and application of these ‘mini-brains’ today in Nature1. “It’s a seminal study to making a brain in a dish,” says Clive Svendsen, a neurobiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved in the study. “That’s phenomenal.” A fully formed artificial brain might still be years away, he notes, but the pea-sized neural clumps developed...
  • Stem cells: Egg engineers

    08/28/2013 5:24:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Nature News | 21 August 2013 | David Cyranoski
    In a technical tour de force, Japanese researchers created eggs and sperm in the laboratory. Now, scientists have to determine how to use those cells safely — and ethically. Since last October, molecular biologist Katsuhiko Hayashi has received around a dozen e-mails from couples, most of them middle-aged, who are desperate for one thing: a baby. One menopausal woman from England offered to come to his laboratory at Kyoto University in Japan in the hope that he could help her to conceive a child. “That is my only wish,” she wrote. The requests started trickling in after Hayashi published the...
  • Milestone study probes cancer origin

    08/17/2013 4:54:38 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 2013 August 14 | James Gallagher
    Scientists are reporting a significant milestone for cancer research after charting 21 major mutations behind the vast majority of tumours. The disruptive changes to the genetic code, reported in Nature, accounted for 97% of the 30 most common cancers. Finding out what causes the mutations could lead to new treatments. Some causes, such as smoking are known, but more than half are still a mystery. Cancer Research UK said it was a fascinating and important study. A tumour starts when one of the building blocks of bodies, a cell, goes wrong. Over the course of a lifetime cells pick up...
  • Rethinking 'The Code'

    08/12/2013 11:42:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 11, 2013 | NA
    A decade ago, gene expression seemed so straightforward: genes were either switched on or off. Not both. Then in 2006, a blockbuster finding reported that developmentally regulated genes in mouse embryonic stem cells can have marks associated with both active and repressed genes, and that such genes, which were referred to as "bivalently marked genes", can be committed to one way or another during development and differentiation. This paradoxical state—akin to figuring out how to navigate a red and green traffic signal—has since undergone scrutiny by labs worldwide. What has been postulated is that the control regions (or promoters) of...
  • Here It Comes … The $375,000 Lab-Grown Beef Burger

    08/04/2013 3:53:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2013-08-02 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    Francois Lenoir/Reuters Meet the new meat. Tiny pieces of muscle tissue grown in the lab will make up the patty of the first test-tube burger to be unveiled in London on Monday. If you take some scientists' word for it, the biggest agricultural revolution since the domestication of livestock is starting on Monday—in an arts center in London. At a carefully orchestrated media event, Dutch stem cell researcher Mark Post is planning to present the world's first test-tube hamburger. Its patty is made from meat that Post has laboriously grown from bovine stem cells in his lab at an estimated...
  • Stem Cells in Urine Easy to Isolate and Have Potential for Numerous Therapies

    08/01/2013 6:50:30 AM PDT · by Salman · 21 replies
    Science News ^ | July 31, 2013 | Science News
    Could harvesting stem cells for therapy one day be as simple as asking patients for a urine sample? Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine and colleagues have identified stem cells in urine that can be directed to become multiple cell types. "These cells can be obtained through a simple, non-invasive low-cost approach that avoids surgical procedures," said Yuanyuan Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of regenerative medicine and senior researcher on the project. Reporting online in the journal Stem Cells, the team successfully directed stem cells from urine to become bladder-type cells, such as smooth muscle...
  • New teeth grown from urine - study

    07/30/2013 10:25:53 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | 29 July 2013 Last updated at 19:44 ET | By James Gallagher
    Scientists have grown rudimentary teeth out of the most unlikely of sources, human urine. The results, published in Cell Regeneration Journal, showed that urine could be used as a source of stem cells that in turn could be grown into tiny tooth-like structures. The team from China hopes the technique could be developed into a way of replacing lost teeth. Other stem cell researchers caution that that goal faces many challenges. Teams of researchers around the world are looking for ways of growing new teeth to replace those lost with age and poor dental hygiene. Stem cells - the master...
  • Researchers Identify Proteins Key in Stem Cell Production

    07/29/2013 10:02:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Jul 8, 2013 | Sergio Prostak
    A multinational team of scientists led by Prof Benjamin Blencowe from the University of Toronto has identified proteins that play a key role in controlling pluripotency, which may mean a potential breakthrough in producing the so-called induced pluripotent stem cells.Colonies of the induced pluripotent stem cells (Boston University Center for Regenerative Medicine) Induced pluripotent stem cells can be of great value for medical research because they can flexibly develop into many different types of cells. However, producing these cells is challenging because the proteins that control their generation are largely unknown.The team discovered the proteins using the splicing code developed...
  • The Pro-Life Case for Stem Cell Treatment

    07/11/2010 8:58:58 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 43 replies
    Pajamas Media ^ | July 11, 2010 | Julia Szabo
    A significant percentage of America’s 45.6 million dog owners and 38.2 million cat owners have first-hand familiarity with state-of-the-art medical facilities for pets that rival the most sophisticated human hospitals: animal emergency centers where veterinary specialists — including neurologists, orthopedists, oncologists, and criticalists — prolong the lives of pets whose owners can afford the service. The mainstream media rarely misses a chance to point out that animal medical care in the United States is almost on par with the best in human health care. But the reality is that the level of animal medical innovation has actually surpassed that of...
  • Stricter standards sought to curb stem-cell confusion

    07/23/2013 10:00:26 PM PDT · by neverdem
    Nature News ^ | 23 July 2013 | Helen Shen
    Initiative aims to clarify description of mesenchymal cells. Pamela Robey is used to being sent samples by scientists who are anxious to know whether the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) they have extracted from fat can be coaxed to turn into either bone or cartilage. Robey, who directs the Stem Cell Unit at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), is also used to delivering bad news to many of those who seek her help. “They usually are not happy,” she says, when her attempts to differentiate the cells produce little more than fatty globules. To Robey, that disappointment reflects a...
  • Microparticles create localized control of stem cell differentiation

    07/09/2013 3:12:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Phys.org ^ | July 9, 2013 | NA
    Georgia Tech/Emory University Associate Professor Todd McDevitt and graduate student Anh Nguyen make microparticles to be used for delivering growth factors to stem cells. Credit: Rob Felt Before scientists and engineers can realize the dream of using stem cells to create replacements for worn out organs and battle damaged body parts, they'll have to develop ways to grow complex three-dimensional structures in large volumes and at costs that won't bankrupt health care systems. Researchers are now reporting advances in these areas by using gelatin-based microparticles to deliver growth factors to specific areas of embryoid bodies, aggregates of differentiating stem...
  • Synthetic Trachea Recipient Dies

    07/08/2013 6:16:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 8 July 2013 | Gretchen Vogel
    The youngest patient to receive an artificial trachea seeded with stem cells has died, The New York Times reported today. Hannah Warren, who was born with a rare birth defect that left her without a trachea, underwent surgery in April to have a synthetic trachea implanted that was seeded with stem cells from her bone marrow. She would have turned 3 in August. Her doctors told The New York Times that her death was due to complications related to a second surgery that was needed to repair her esophagus, which had not properly healed after the initial surgery. They said...
  • Alligator Stem Cells Offer Hope for Tooth Regeneration in Humans

    05/18/2013 2:08:28 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 17 replies
    sci-news.com ^ | 5/17/13 | Natali Anderson
    An international team of scientists led by Prof Cheng-Ming Chuong from the University of Southern California has discovered unique cellular and molecular mechanisms behind tooth renewal in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, pave the way for tooth regeneration in people. “Humans naturally only have two sets of teeth – baby teeth and adult teeth. Ultimately, we want to identify stem cells that can be used as a resource to stimulate tooth renewal in adult humans who have lost teeth. But, to do that, we must first understand how they renew...
  • US researchers make embryonic stem cells from skin [Pro-Abortion Crowd Deeply Saddened]

    05/16/2013 3:32:18 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | 5/16/13
    US researchers have reported a breakthrough in stem cell research, describing how they have turned human skin cells into embyronic stem cells for the first time. The method described Wednesday by Oregon State University scientists in the journal Cell, would not likely be able to create human clones, said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. But it is an important step in research because it does not require the use of embryos in creating the type of stem cell capable of transforming into any other type of cell in the body.
  • Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

    05/15/2013 2:09:10 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 May 2013 | Paul Gabrielsen
    Enlarge Image Young at heart. Cross-sections of mouse ventricles show the visible change in size when old hearts are immersed in young blood. Credit: Francesco Loffredo It's time to turn back the clock on an aging ticker. Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It's not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart's most frustrating ailments. "This is probably...
  • Position Yourself for Big Returns in the Stem Cell Space: Jason Kolbert

    05/15/2013 3:34:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    The Life Sciences Report ^ | May 13th, 2013 | George S. Mack
    This interview was conducted by George S. Mack of The Life Sciences Report (5/10/13) Stem cell companies have languished long enough in micro-cap territory. The industry is now approaching highly visible phase 2 and phase 3 catalysts that will produce results never before seen in medicine. Managing Director and Senior Biotechnology Analyst Jason Kolbert of the Maxim Group has staked out a select group of nascent cell therapy companies positioned to reap huge gains for investors willing to diversify. In this interview with The Life Sciences Report, Kolbert reflects on the regenerative medicine space following the recent RegenMed Investor Day...
  • Obama Admin Allows Company to Use Aborted Baby Cells for Research

    04/21/2013 6:11:47 PM PDT · by Morgana · 14 replies
    life news ^ | Right to Life of Michigan
    Michigan is in the national news because of a disturbing development in human fetal stem cell experimentation. Neuralstem, Inc. announced that it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to expand an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) Phase II study to the University of Michigan. The stem cells used in the study come from spinal cord tissue taken from a healthy, 8-week-old aborted baby. Phase I of the trial tested whether human fetal stem cells can safely be injected into the spinal cord. According to Neuralstem, the aim of Phase II is to obtain the maximum tolerated...
  • Mayo Clinic: Cardiopoietic 'Smart' Stem Cells Show Promise in Heart Failure Patients

    04/12/2013 7:05:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Mayo Clinic ^ | April 10, 2013 | NA
    First-in-humans study introduces next generation cell therapyROCHESTER, Minn. — Translating a Mayo Clinic stem-cell discovery, an international team has demonstrated that therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or "smart" stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions. Results of the clinical trial appear online of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. VIDEO ALERT: Audio and video resources are available on the Mayo Clinic News Network. The multi-center,...
  • Discovery in Neuroscience Could Help Re-Wire Appetite Control

    04/06/2013 9:05:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 5, 2013 | NA
    Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have made a discovery in neuroscience that could offer a long-lasting solution to eating disorders such as obesity. It was previously thought that the nerve cells in the brain associated with appetite regulation were generated entirely during an embryo's development in the womb and therefore their numbers were fixed for life. But research published today in the Journal of Neuroscience has identified a population of stem cells capable of generating new appetite-regulating neurons in the brains of young and adult rodents. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally. More than 1.4 billion adults...
  • Non-Embryonic Stem Cells: The Dawning of a New Era of Hope

    04/05/2013 9:38:14 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 2 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | April 05, 2013 – 04:58 PM | Philip Bethge
    Ethical worries have slowed medical research into applications for stem cells. But scientists like Robert Lanza have developed less controversial ways to derive stem cells from normal body cells rather than embryos and are already launching the first clinical trials. … (T)here is a world premiere in the making: Lanza’s team has cultivated blood platelets that could be tested in hospitals as early as this year. The researcher and his team didn’t harvest the cells from embryonic stem cells, but rather from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from normal body cells. …
  • Stem Cells Entering Heart Can Be Tracked With Nano-Hitchhikers

    03/25/2013 10:42:08 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Mar. 20, 2013 | NA
    The promise of repairing damaged hearts through regenerative medicine -- infusing stem cells into the heart in the hope that these cells will replace worn out or damaged tissue -- has yet to meet with clinical success. But a highly sensitive visualization technique developed by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists may help speed that promise's realization. The technique is described in a study published March 20 in Science Translational Medicine. Testing the new imaging method in humans is probably three to five years off. Human and animal trials in which stem cells were injected into cardiac tissue to treat...
  • Stem Cell Biology

    03/15/2013 12:37:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Cell Research ^ | January 2013 | NA
    The January special issue of Cell Research on Stem Cell Biology brings together the latest reviews and articles in the field. Together with the accompanying web focus, Cell Research delves into our current understanding and investigates recent advances in various aspects of stem cell biology, cell reprogramming, and their relevance to diseases.Special Issue on Stem Cell Biology
  • Diabetes Reversal In Mice Via Stem Cells

    03/07/2013 3:15:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    redOrbit ^ | June 28, 2012 | Connie K. Ho
    Diabetes is a detrimental disease. In order to combat the illness, University of British Columbia (UBC) researchers conducted a study with an industry partner and discovered that stem cells can reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice. The discovery leads the way for the development of innovative treatments of diabetes, which is caused by deficient production of insulin by the pancreas. Insulin allows glucose to be held by the bodyÂ’s muscle, fat, and liver; in turn, itÂ’s used as fuel for the body. Blindness, heart attack, kidney failure, nerve damage, and stroke are possible consequences of low insulin production. The research...
  • Stem cell heart repairs: 21st century medicine in action

    02/22/2013 5:45:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Miami Herald ^ | February 22, 2013 | LIDIA DINKOVA
    Gerard Cuomo loves to dance. Until recently, however, the 70-year-old couldn’t even do a two-step. After having three heart attacks in the early 1990s, Cuomo’s heart was severely damaged. The scar tissue that had formed around his heart left him easily fatigued. “I felt like an old man,” said Cuomo of Aventura. “I could barely climb the stairs. I could walk for about a quarter of a mile. Shopping at the mall — I wish I did not have to sit down all the time.” In May 2010, he participated in a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s clinical...
  • Stem-cell approach shows promise for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    01/23/2013 5:28:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | January 14, 2013 | NA
    University of Illinois comparative biosciences professor Suzanne Berry-Miller, veterinary clinical medicine professor Robert O’Brien.Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD. Their findings appear in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the gene for dystrophin, a protein that anchors muscle cells in place when they contract. Without dystrophin, muscle contractions tear cell membranes, leading to cell death. The lost...
  • Japan researchers grow kidney tissue from stem cells

    01/23/2013 3:37:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies
    AFP via Google ^ | 1/23/2013 | NA
    16 hours ago TOKYO — Researchers in Japan said Wednesday they have succeeded in growing human kidney tissue from stem cells for the first time in a potential breakthrough for millions with damaged organs who are dependent on dialysis. Kidneys have a complex structure that is not easily repaired once damaged, but the latest findings put scientists on the road to helping a diseased or distressed organ fix itself. Kenji Osafune of Kyoto University said his team had managed to take stem cells -- the "blank slates" capable of being programmed to become any kind of cell in the body...
  • Faster, Safer Method for Producing Stem Cells

    12/18/2012 12:06:26 AM PST · by neverdem
    ScienceDaily ^ | Dec. 3, 2012 | NA
    A new method for generating stem cells from mature cells promises to boost stem cell production in the laboratory, helping to remove a barrier to regenerative medicine therapies that would replace damaged or unhealthy body tissues. The technique, developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, allows for the unlimited production of stem cells and their derivatives as well as reduces production time by more than half, from nearly two months to two weeks. "One of the barriers that needs to be overcome before stem cell therapies can be widely adopted is the difficulty of producing enough cells...
  • EUROPEAN PROJECT AIMS TO CREATE 1,500 NEW STEM CELL LINES

    12/17/2012 10:49:43 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Singularity Hub ^ | 12/17/12 | Peter Murray
    Stem cells derived from patients with disorders, such as these Parkinson’s cells, could foster drug screening to find treatments and also provide researchers a valuable tool to study disease. Europe certainly believes in the promise of stem cells.A joint public-private collaboration between the European Union and Europe’s pharmaceutical industry, called the StemBANCC project, will spend nearly 50 million euros to create 1,500 pluripotent stem cell lines. But the initiative’s goal isn’t to find a stem cell-based cure for diabetes or Alzheimer’s disease. They hope instead that their stem cell lines will prove to be faster and more effective drug screens...
  • Repair damaged eyes with stem cell discs

    12/13/2012 8:25:58 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Futurity ^ | December 11, 2012 | Amy Stone-Sheffield
    U. SHEFFIELD (UK) — Engineers have developed a new technique to graft a biodegradable disc loaded with stem cells onto damaged eyes.The team at the University of Sheffield describes the method, which involves producing membranes to assist with grafting, in the journal Acta Biomaterialia. The goal is to treat damage to the cornea, the transparent layer on the front of the eye, which is one of the major causes of blindness in the world.Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers made a disc of biodegradable material that can be fixed over the cornea. The disc...
  • Stem-Cell Cures Without the Controversy

    12/08/2012 9:49:01 PM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | December 7, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    The chief medical ambition of those who study stem cells has always been that the cells would be used to repair and regenerate damaged tissue. That's still a long way off, despite rapid progress exemplified by the presentation of the Nobel Prize next week to Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University for a key stem-cell breakthrough. But there's another, less well known application of stem cells that is already delivering results: disease modeling. Dr. Yamanaka used a retrovirus to insert four genes into a mouse cell to return it to a "pluripotent" state—capable of turning into almost any kind of cell....
  • Scientists Discover Children’s Cells Living in Mothers’ Brains

    12/07/2012 1:50:17 PM PST · by NYer · 66 replies
    Scientific American ^ | December 4, 2012 | Robert Martone
    The link between a mother and child is profound, and new research suggests a physical connection even deeper than anyone thought. The profound psychological and physical bonds shared by the mother and her child begin during gestation when the mother is everything for the developing fetus, supplying warmth and sustenance, while her heartbeat provides a soothing constant rhythm. The physical connection between mother and fetus is provided by the placenta, an organ, built of cells from both the mother and fetus, which serves as a conduit for the exchange of nutrients, gasses, and wastes. Cells may migrate through the placenta...
  • 'Fountain of youth' technique rejuvenates aging stem cells

    11/29/2012 7:38:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | November 27, 2012 | NA
    This is an image of an aged stem cell after growth factors were added. A new method of growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks. The discovery, which transforms aged stem cells into cells that function like much younger ones, may one day enable scientists to grow cardiac patches for damaged or diseased hearts from a patient's own stem cells—no matter what age the patient—while avoiding the threat of rejection. Stem cell therapies involving donated bone marrow stem cells run the risk of patient rejection in a portion of the population, argues Milica Radisic, Canada Research Chair...
  • Protein's destructive journey in brain may cause Parkinson's

    11/29/2012 12:56:56 PM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | November 16, 2012 | Laura Sanders
    Clumps of alpha-synuclein move through dopamine-producing cells, mouse study finds The insidious spread of an abnormal protein may be behind Parkinson’s disease, a study in mice suggests. A harmful version of the protein crawls through the brains of healthy mice, killing brain cells and damaging the animals’ balance and coordination, researchers report in the Nov. 16 Science. If a similar process happens in humans, the results could eventually point to ways to stop Parkinson’s destruction in the brain. “I really think that this model will increase our ability to come up with Parkinson’s disease therapies,” says study coauthor Virginia Lee...