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Keyword: science

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Halo of the Cat's Eye

    06/01/2014 12:08:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | June 01, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is one of the best known planetary nebulae in the sky. Its haunting symmetries are seen in the very central region of this stunning false-color picture, processed to reveal the enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material, over three light-years across, which surrounds the brighter, familiar planetary nebula. Made with data from the Nordic Optical Telescope in the Canary Islands, the composite picture shows extended emission from the nebula. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase in the life of a sun-like star. Only much more recently however, have...
  • Robot Designed to Run Like a Velociraptor; Korea's 'Raptor' Speed Rivals Usain Bolt's

    05/31/2014 7:11:00 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 23 replies
    Headlines and Global News ^ | 05/31/2014 | By John Nassivera |
    A team of researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have created a new sprinting robot inspired by a velociraptor. The robot, dubbed the Raptor, runs on two legs, and is capable of running 46 kilometers per hour (kph), or 28 miles per hour (mph), on a treadmill, according to CNET. Raptor can run faster than Usain Bolt, Olympic sprinter and the fastest known human, who has a recorded top speed of 44.7kph (27.44 mph). The robot is almost as fast as Boston Dynamics' Cheetah, which can run at 47kph (29.3 mph). Both Raptor and Cheetah...
  • Pedophiles: born that way?

    05/31/2014 5:36:36 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 61 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | Razib Khan
    Gawker published a piece on the neurological problems which might result in pedophilia, and naturally a lot of shock and disgust was triggered. The piece is titled Born This Way: Sympathy and Science for Those Who Want to Have Sex with Children. This isn’t something you want to click through to lightly. So fair warning. The neurobiological material did pique my interest: “There was nothing significant in the frontal lobes or temporal lobes,” says Cantor. “It turned out the differences weren’t in the grey matter. The differences were in the white matter.”“The white matter” is the shorthand term for groupings...
  • Anatomy Of A Dance Hit: Why We Love To Boogie With Pharrell

    05/31/2014 5:38:06 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 39 replies
    NPR ^ | May 30, 2014 | Michaeleen Doucleff
    There's no doubt Pharrell's "Happy" is the biggest hit of the year so far. It spent 15 weeks at the top of the Billboard 100 and inspired hundreds of fan videos on YouTube. Just a few weeks ago, six Iranian teenagers got arrested for posting a video of themselves dancing to the catchy song. So what is it about "Happy" that triggers a nearly uncontrollable need to tap your foot, bob your head or move to the rhythm in some way? Pharrell Williams. The Record Pharrell Williams On Juxtaposition And Seeing Sounds Rick Blaine, the sentimental tough guy in Casablanca,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Satellite Station and Southern Skies

    05/31/2014 4:30:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 31, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This clear night skyscape captures the colorful glow of aurora australis, the southern lights, just outside the port city of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, planet Earth. As if staring into the dreamlike scene, the Tasmanian Earth Resources Satellite Station poses in the center, illuminated by nearby city lights. Used to receive data from spacebased Earth observing instruments, including NASA's MODIS and SeaWiFS, the station was decommissioned in 2011 and dismantled only recently, shortly after the picture was taken on April 30. Still shining in southern skies though, the central bulge of our Milky Way galaxy and two bright satellite galaxies...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Planetary Nebula Abell 36

    05/30/2014 6:49:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | May 30, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The gorgeous, gaseous shroud of a dying sunlike star, planetary nebula Abell 36 lies a mere 800 light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. At that distance it spans over 1.5 light-years in this sharp telescopic view. Shrugging off its outer layers, the nebula's central star is contracting and becoming hotter, evolving towards a final white dwarf phase. In fact, in Abell 36, the central star is estimated to have a surface temperature of over 73,000 K, compared to the Sun's present 6,000 K temperature. As a result, the intensely hot star is much brighter in ultraviolet light, compared...
  • Santa Cruz teen wins NASA video contest award

    05/30/2014 7:01:09 AM PDT · by ProtectOurFreedom · 7 replies
    Santa Cruz Sentinel ^ | 5/22/14 | Jessica A. York
    In March, while scouring through her math teacher's pile of projects, Anna Olson was attracted to the sciences section, and discovered NASA's 2014 educational "REEL Science Communications" video contest. In a two-week period, Olson pulled together two different contest entries, with a little help from dad and movie producer Gregory T. Olson's green screen, brother Geoffrey Olson's guitar-strumming skills and fact-checking by older brother Alec Olson, who works in a lab at UC Davis. The Pacific Collegiate School student reviewed her video entries, posted on YouTube during an interview at her school. She pointed out that her winning entry had...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Millions of Stars in Omega Centauri

    05/29/2014 4:13:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 29, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Globular star cluster Omega Centauri, also known as NGC 5139, is some 15,000 light-years away. The cluster is packed with about 10 million stars much older than the Sun within a volume about 150 light-years in diameter, the largest and brightest of 200 or so known globular clusters that roam the halo of our Milky Way galaxy. Though most star clusters consist of stars with the same age and composition, the enigmatic Omega Cen exhibits the presence of different stellar populations with a spread of ages and chemical abundances. In fact, Omega Cen may be the remnant core of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Cone Nebula from Hubble

    05/28/2014 5:06:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | May 28, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone's blunted head is a mere...
  • The Science is Settled

    05/28/2014 4:55:14 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 12 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 5-28-2014 | MOTUS
    Todays reflection: Obama Unleashes His Inner Geek (Again) at White House Science Fair."The last thing we can afford to do right now is play politics with our kids' health."The science is settled then: if you want to eat, youll eat what we tell you to eat. Posted from: Michelle Obamas Mirror
  • Obama Berates Reporter at Science Fair

    05/27/2014 8:40:10 PM PDT · by Nachum · 32 replies
    Washington Free Beacon ^ | 5/2/7/14 | Staff
    President Obama berated Real Clear Politics reporter Alexis Simendinger after she asked him about reports of the U.S. sending trainers to help the rebels in Syria. Moments after the president finished speaking with individual students and taking pictures with the press at the White Houses science fair exhibit, Simendinger asked him a question regarding these reports. Im sorry, were doing a science fair- cmon, cmon, Obama responded before rushing out of the room and avoiding comment on the breaking news.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Star Factory Messier 17

    05/26/2014 10:20:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | May 27, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening at the center of this nebula? Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, the star factory known as Messier 17 lies some 5,500 light-years away in the nebula-rich constellation Sagittarius. At that distance, this degree wide field of view spans almost 100 light-years. The sharp, composite, color image utilizing data from space and ground based telescopes, follows faint details of the region's gas and dust clouds against a backdrop of central Milky Way stars. Stellar winds and energetic light from hot, massive stars formed from M17's stock of cosmic gas and dust have slowly carved away at the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- An ALMA Telescope Array Time-Lapse

    05/26/2014 10:17:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | May 26, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It is the most expensive and complex ground-based astronomy project ever -- what will it see tonight? The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project consists of 66 dishes, many the size of a small house, situated in the high altitude Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. Together, ALMA observes the skies in high-frequency radio light, a band usually used only for local communication due to considerable absorption by humid air. The thin atmosphere and low humidity above ALMA, however, enable it to see deep into our universe in new and unique ways that allow, for example, explorations of the early...
  • Confirmed: Urine is not sterile

    05/26/2014 5:21:53 AM PDT · by equalator · 56 replies
    LiveScience via FoxNews ^ | 5-23-2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    The popular notion that urine is sterile is a myth, new research finds. Yes, the myth that comes up every time someone pees in a pool (or drinking water reservoir) is actually false. In fact, bacteria do live in urine, Loyola University researchers reported this week at the general meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Boston. "We need to reassess everything we think we know about urine," study researcher Evann Hilt, a graduate student at Loyola, told Live Science.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Camelopardalids and ISS

    05/25/2014 1:29:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | May 25, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: From a camp on the northern shores of the Great Lake Erie, three short bright meteor streaks were captured in this composited night skyscape. Recorded over the early morning hours of May 24, the meteors are elusive Camelopardalids. Their trails point back to the meteor shower's radiant near Polaris, in the large but faint constellation Camelopardalis the camel leopard, or in modern terms the Giraffe. While a few meteors did appear, the shower was not an active one as the Earth crossed through the predicted debris trail of periodic comet 209P/LINEAR. Of course, the long bright streak in the...
  • Bionic particles self-assemble to capture light

    05/25/2014 11:23:26 AM PDT · by equalator · 6 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | 5-20-2014 | Kate McAlpine
    Inspired by fictional cyborgs like Terminator, a team of researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of Pittsburgh has made the first bionic particles from semiconductors and proteins. "These design principles can be used to guide future designs for other bionic systems, starting from the primary building blocks of biological organisms and inorganic machines," Kotov said. "It is very possible that Terminator of the future would need to be constructed starting from such building blocks."
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Circumhorizontal Arc Over Ohio

    05/23/2014 9:51:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | May 24, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why would clouds appear to be different colors? The reason here is that ice crystals in distant cirrus clouds are acting like little floating prisms. Sometimes known as a fire rainbow for its flame-like appearance, a circumhorizon arc lies parallel to the horizon. For a circumhorizontal arc to be visible, the Sun must be at least 58 degrees high in a sky where cirrus clouds are present. Furthermore, the numerous, flat, hexagonal ice-crystals that compose the cirrus cloud must be aligned horizontally to properly refract sunlight in a collectively similar manner. Therefore, circumhorizontal arcs are quite unusual to see....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Rosetta's Target Comet

    05/23/2014 1:23:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | May 23, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Rosetta spacecraft captured this remarkable series of 9 frames between March 27 and May 4, as it closed from 5 million to 2 million kilometers of its target comet. Cruising along a 6.5 year orbit toward closest approach to the Sun next year, periodic comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen moving past a distant background of stars in Ophiuchus and globular star cluster M107. The comet's developing coma is actually visible by the end of the sequence, extending for some 1300 km into space. Rosetta is scheduled for an early August rendezvous with the comet's nucleus. Now clearly active, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Halo for NGC 6164

    05/22/2014 3:36:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | May 22, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Beautiful emission nebula NGC 6164 was created by a rare, hot, luminous O-type star, some 40 times as massive as the Sun. Seen at the center of the cosmic cloud, the star is a mere 3 to 4 million years old. In another three to four million years the massive star will end its life in a supernova explosion. Spanning around 4 light-years, the nebula itself has a bipolar symmetry. That makes it similar in appearance to more common and familiar planetary nebulae - the gaseous shrouds surrounding dying sun-like stars. Also like many planetary nebulae, NGC 6164 has...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Supercell Storm Cloud Forming over Wyoming

    05/22/2014 3:32:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | May 21, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How do supercell storm clouds form? Pictured above is a time-lapse video taken last Sunday detailing the formation of one such violent supercell in eastern Wyoming, USA. Starting as part of a large and dark thunderstorm complex, the supercell comes together along with a large rotating updraft of air known as a mesocyclone. Mesocyclones form during rapid changes in wind speed and direction with height and can produce torrential rain, damaging hail, swirling winds, and sometimes tornadoes. Storm watchers are seen studying, imaging, and ultimately running from the developing storm cloud during the video. During the middle part of...