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Keyword: science

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Earth and Moon from Saturn

    07/22/2013 3:28:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | July 22, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: You are here. Everyone you've ever known is here. Every human who has ever lived -- is here. Pictured above is the Earth-Moon system as captured by the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn in the outer Solar System. Earth is the brighter of the two spots near the center, while the Moon is visible to its lower left. The unprocessed image shows several streaks that are not stars but rather cosmic rays that struck the digital camera while it was taking the image. The image was snapped by Cassini on Friday and released on Saturday. At nearly the same time,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Seasons of Saturn

    07/21/2013 4:53:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | July 21, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Since Saturn's axis is tilted as it orbits the Sun, Saturn has seasons, like those of planet Earth ... but Saturn's seasons last for over seven years. So what season is it on Saturn now? Orbiting the equator, the tilt of the rings of Saturn provides quite a graphic seasonal display. Each year until 2016, Saturn's rings will be increasingly apparent after appearing nearly edge-on in 2009. The ringed planet is also well placed in evening skies providing a grand view as summer comes to Saturn's northern hemisphere and winter to the south. The Hubble Space Telescope took the...
  • Not Everything Is Due To Bias, Including All-Male Physics Departments

    07/21/2013 2:39:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | July 19th 2013 | News Staff
    If a physics department has no women, does that mean there is hiring discrimination? Only if your job in sociology is to find discrimination. Simple statistics shows that is not true or there would be claims of discrimination in psychology, where lots of departments have no men. Yet when it comes to gender equality advocates, physics is always mentioned and psychology never is. A new analysis by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center debunks the claim that the existence of all-male departments is evidence of hiring bias. Labor statistics have backed that up; not only are women...
  • 3,000-year-old palace in Israel linked to biblical King David

    07/20/2013 10:54:27 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 18 replies
    NBC News ^ | 7-20-13 | Allen Boyle
    Israeli archaeologists say they have found the remains of a palace that they believe was a seat of power for the biblical King David — but other experts say that claim shouldn't be taken as the gospel truth. The discovery, announced on Thursday by the Israeli Antiquities Authority, revives a debate over one of the Bible's central stories as well as the origins of the ancient Jewish state. The debate focuses on an archaeological site known as Khirbet Qeiyafa, about 20 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Jerusalem. Khirbet Qeiyafa has been associated with the ancient city of Sha'arayim, which is...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet Lemmon and the Deep Sky

    07/20/2013 3:12:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | July 20, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Now sweeping high above the ecliptic plane, Comet Lemmon has faded dramatically in planet Earth's night sky as it heads for the outer solar system. Some 16 light-minutes (2 AU) from the Sun, it still sports a greenish coma though, posing on the right in this 4 degree wide telescopic view from last Saturday with deep sky star clusters and nebulae in Cassiopeia. In fact, the rich background skyscape is typical within the boundaries of the boastful northern constellation that lie along the crowded starfields of the Milky Way. Included near center is open star cluster M52 about 5,000...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Take a Picture of Saturn

    07/19/2013 3:41:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | July 19, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Take a picture of Saturn in the sky tonight. You could capture a view like this one. Recorded just last month looking toward the south, planet Earth and ruins of the ancient temple of Athena at Assos, Turkey are in the foreground. The Moon rises at the far left of the frame and Saturn is the bright "star" at the upper right, near Virgo's alpha star Spica (picture with labels). If you do take a picture of Saturn or wave at Saturn and take a picture, you can share it online and submit it to the Saturn Mosaic Project....
  • Can Quantum Mechanics Produce a Universe from Nothing?

    07/18/2013 10:36:09 AM PDT · by kimtom · 170 replies
    www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 2/1/2013 | Jeff Miller, Ph.D.
    According to the First Law of Thermodynamics, nothing in the Universe (i.e., matter or energy) can pop into existence from nothing (see Miller, 2013). All of the scientific evidence points to that conclusion. So, the Universe could not have popped into existence before the alleged “big bang” (an event which we do not endorse). Therefore, God must have created the Universe. One of the popular rebuttals by the atheistic community is that quantum mechanics could have created the Universe. In 1905, Albert Einstein proposed the idea of mass-energy equivalence, resulting in the famous equation, E = mc2 (1905). We now...
  • 'Comet of the century' nears Earth

    07/18/2013 9:48:26 AM PDT · by Sopater · 81 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 18, 2013 | Megan Gannon
    About 10,000 years ago, Comet ISON left our solar system's distant shell, a region known as the Oort cloud, and began streaking toward the sun. This November, the icy wanderer will reach the climax of its journey, potentially providing a stunning skywatching show here on Earth. Comet ISON was discovered just last September by two Russian amateur astronomers. Scientists have since recognized ISON as a possible "comet of the century," but to live up to its promise, it will have to survive its dangerous perihelion, or closest approach to the sun. ISON is what's known as a sungrazing comet. These...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Hidden Galaxy IC 342

    07/18/2013 2:48:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | July 18, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Similar in size to large, bright spiral galaxies in our neighborhood, IC 342 is a mere 10 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night sky, but it is hidden from clear view and only glimpsed through the veil of stars, gas and dust clouds along the plane of our own Milky Way galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed by intervening cosmic clouds, this deep telescopic image traces the galaxy's obscuring dust, blue star clusters, and glowing pink star forming regions...
  • Scientists Shut Down Chromosome Responsible for Down Syndrome

    07/17/2013 3:15:40 PM PDT · by NYer · 26 replies
    Life News ^ | July 17, 2013 | Steven Ertelt
    Scientists say they have been able to turn off the chromosome responsible for Down Syndrome. This stunning achievement raises the prospect that someday a therapy could be developed to prevent or reverse the disorder.Down Syndrome is a condition that subjects 90 percent of unborn children diagnosed with it to abortion. What if doctors could someday treat unborn children before birth with a drug or therapy that could reverse the disorder? What kind of impact would that have on the incidence of abortion? How would society look if the numbers of people with Down Syndrome took an even more drastic decline?The...
  • Our Faith in Science (If science proves Buddhism wrong, then Buddhism will have to change)

    07/17/2013 11:40:53 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 53 replies
    New York Times ^ | 11/12/2005 | TENZIN GYATSO, 14th Dalai Lama
    SCIENCE has always fascinated me. As a child in Tibet, I was keenly curious about how things worked. When I got a toy I would play with it a bit, then take it apart to see how it was put together. As I became older, I applied the same scrutiny to a movie projector and an antique automobile. At one point I became particularly intrigued by an old telescope, with which I would study the heavens. One night while looking at the moon I realized that there were shadows on its surface. I corralled my two main tutors to show...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Waterspout in Florida

    07/17/2013 12:05:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | July 17, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening over the water? Pictured above is one of the better images yet recorded of a waterspout, a type of tornado that occurs over water. Waterspouts are spinning columns of rising moist air that typically form over warm water. Waterspouts can be as dangerous as tornadoes and can feature wind speeds over 200 kilometers per hour. Some waterspouts form away from thunderstorms and even during relatively fair weather. Waterspouts may be relatively transparent and initially visible only by an unusual pattern they create on the water. The above image was taken earlier this month near Tampa Bay, Florida....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Sombrero Galaxy from Hale

    07/17/2013 12:01:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | July 15, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's going on in the center of this spiral galaxy? Named the Sombrero Galaxy for its hat-like resemblance, M104 features a prominent dust lane and a bright halo of stars and globular clusters. Reasons for the Sombrero's hat-like appearance include an unusually large and extended central bulge of stars, and dark prominent dust lanes that appear in a disk that we see nearly edge-on. Billions of old stars cause the diffuse glow of the extended central bulge visible in the above image from the 200-inch Hale Telescope. Close inspection of the central bulge shows many points of light that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Moon from Zond 8

    07/16/2013 4:04:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | July 16, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Which moon is this? Earth's. Our Moon's unfamiliar appearance is due partly to an unfamiliar viewing angle as captured by a little-known spacecraft -- the Soviet Union's Zond 8 that circled the Moon in October of 1970. Pictured above, the dark-centered circular feature that stands out near the top of the image is Mare Orientale, a massive impact basin formed by an ancient collision with an asteroid. Mare Orientale is surrounded by light colored and highly textured highlands. Across the image bottom lies the dark and expansive Oceanus Procellarum, the largest of the dark (but dry) maria that dominate...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Pillars of Eagle Castle

    07/13/2013 10:04:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | July 14, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What lights up this castle of star formation? The familiar Eagle Nebula glows bright in many colors at once. The above image is a composite of three of these glowing gas colors. Pillars of dark dust nicely outline some of the denser towers of star formation. Energetic light from young massive stars causes the gas to glow and effectively boils away part of the dust and gas from its birth pillar. Many of these stars will explode after several million years, returning most of their elements back to the nebula which formed them. This process is forming an open...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sunspot at Sunset

    07/12/2013 9:54:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | July 13, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Reddened rays of the setting Sun flooded the skies over Cedar Creek Lake, southeast of Dallas, Texas, planet Earth on July 6th. And while sunsets may be the most watched celestial event, this one even offered something extra. A sunspot so large it was visible to the naked eye is captured in the serene sunset view, near the center of a solar disk dimmed and distorted by Earth's dense atomosphere. Telescopic views revealed the spot to be a complex of large solar active regions composed of sunspots, some larger than planet Earth itself.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Messier's Eleven

    07/12/2013 3:59:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | July 12, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This fifteen degree wide field of view stretches across the crowded starfields of Sagittarius toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the center of the galaxy lies near the right edge of the rich starscape and eleven bright star clusters and nebulae fall near the center of the frame. All eleven are numbered entries in the catalog compiled by 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier. Gaining celebrity status with skygazers, M8 (Lagoon), M16 (Eagle), M17 (Omega), and M20 (Trifid) show off the telltale reddish hues of emission nebulae associated with star forming regions. But also eye-catching...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Dusty Nebulae in Taurus

    07/11/2013 3:49:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | July 11, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This complex of dusty nebulae linger along the edge of the Taurus molecular cloud, a mere 450 light-years distant. Stars are forming on the cosmic scene, including extremely youthful star RY Tauri prominent toward the upper left of the 1.5 degree wide telescopic field. In fact RY Tauri is a pre-main sequence star, embedded in its natal cloud of gas and dust, also cataloged as reflection nebula vdB 27. Highly variable, the star is still relatively cool and in the late phases of gravitational collapse. It will soon become a stable, low mass, main sequence star, a stage of...
  • US Director Changes Film Title to Honour Nikola Tesla’s Birthday

    07/11/2013 1:56:40 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 36 replies
    Wild Rooster ^ | July 10, 2013 | Marcus Agar
    The overwhelming reception for his forthcoming biopic about Nikola Tesla has led American director Michael Anton to deliver a new name to sum up the iconic nature of the man and his unique legacy. “Nikola Tesla does not need a controversial label,’ said Michael Anton. “The fact that his name is not as familiar as it should be is one of the issues we intend to address with this film, which has progressed from a strong script with a modest budget into a potential voice that will finally break the great silence that is the history of Nikola Tesla. “From...
  • NIKOLA TESLA - THE SERBIAN GENIUS "WHO LIT THE WORLD"

    07/10/2013 9:10:14 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 18 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 11, 2013 | Dr. Ljubo Vujovic
    "Were we to seize and eliminate from our industrial world the result of Mr. Tesla's work, the wheels of industry would cease to turn, our electric cars and trains would stop, our towns would be dark and our mills would be idle and dead. His name marks an epoch in the advance of electrical science."Vice President Behrend of the Institute of Electrical EngineersNikola Tesla symbolizes a unifying force and inspiration for all nations in the name of peace and science. He was a true visionary far ahead of his contemporaries in the field of scientific development. New York State and...