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Keyword: science

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Great Meteor Procession of 1913

    02/09/2013 11:52:18 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | February 09, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One hundred years ago today the Great Meteor Procession of 1913 occurred, a sky event described by some as "magnificent" and "entrancing" and which left people feeling "spellbound" and "privileged". Because one had to be in a right location, outside, and under clear skies, only about 1,000 people noted seeing the procession. Lucky sky gazers -- particularly those near Toronto, Canada -- had their eyes drawn to an amazing train of bright meteors streaming across the sky, in groups, over the course of a few minutes. A current leading progenitor hypothesis is that a single large meteor once grazed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6822: Barnard's Galaxy

    02/08/2013 3:57:57 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | February 08, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory, flaunting their young, bright, blue star clusters in beautiful, symmetric spiral arms. But small galaxies form stars too, like nearby NGC 6822, also known as Barnard's Galaxy. Beyond the rich starfields in the constellation Sagittarius, NGC 6822 is a mere 1.5 million light-years away, a member of our Local Group of galaxies. About 7,000 light-years across, the dwarf irregular galaxy is seen to be filled with young blue stars and mottled with the telltale pinkish hydrogen glow of star forming regions in the deep color composite image. Contributing to...
  • Bose-Einstein condensate created at room temperature

    02/07/2013 12:43:29 PM PST · by Kevmo · 106 replies
    Vortex-L ^ | Feb 6 2013 | Axil Axil
    RE: [Vo]:Bose-Einstein condensate created at room temperature Jones Beene Thu, 07 Feb 2013 11:13:22 -0800 Yes they can. In fact this could be important for LENR, should it be broad enough to include other boson quasiparticles, such as the magnon. The definitions are similar: polaritons are quasiparticles resulting from strong coupling of electromagnetic waves with an electric or magnetic dipole-carrying excitation. The magnon could be imagined to be the subset of that - where the coupling is only magnetic. However, it may be only a partial subset with other features included. Polaritons describe the dispersion of light (photons) with an...
  • Creation story isn't science but reveals God's love, pope says

    02/07/2013 6:26:00 AM PST · by Alex Murphy · 134 replies
    US Catholic ^ | February 6, 2013 | Carol Glatz
    VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The biblical account of creation isn't a textbook for science, Pope Benedict XVI said. Instead, the first chapter of Genesis reveals the fundamental truth about reality: that the world is not the result of chaos, but is born of and continually supported by God's love, the pope said Feb. 6 at his weekly general audience. In a series of Year of Faith audience talks about the creed, Pope Benedict touched on the description of God as "creator of heaven and earth." In an age of science and advanced technology, how are Catholics supposed to understand the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet Lemmon near the South Celestial Pole

    02/07/2013 4:00:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | February 07, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Currently sweeping through southern skies, Comet Lemmon (C/2012 F6) was named for its discovery last year as part of the Mount Lemmon (Arizona) Survey. Brighter than expected but still just below naked-eye visibility, Comet Lemmon sports a stunning lime green coma and faint divided tail in this telescopic image from February 4. The greenish tint comes from the coma's diatomic C2 gas fluorescing in sunlight. Captured from an observatory near Sydney, Australia, the color composite is constructed from a series of individual exposures registered on the comet. Across the 1 degree wide field of view, the star trails are...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Arms of M106

    02/06/2013 8:04:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | February 06, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The spiral arms of bright galaxy M106 sprawl through this remarkable multiframe portrait, composed of data from ground- and space-based telescopes. Also known as NGC 4258, M106 can be found toward the northern constellation Canes Venatici. The well-measured distance to M106 is 23.5 million light-years, making this cosmic scene about 80,000 light-years across. Typical in grand spiral galaxies, dark dust lanes, youthful blue star clusters, and pinkish star forming regions trace spiral arms that converge on the bright nucleus of older yellowish stars. But this detailed composite reveals hints of two anomalous arms that don't align with the more...
  • The Rise and Fall of Nikola Tesla and his Tower

    02/06/2013 6:44:07 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 72 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | February 4, 2013
    By the end of his brilliant and tortured life, the Serbian physicist, engineer and inventor Nikola Tesla was penniless and living in a small New York City hotel room. He spent days in a park surrounded by the creatures that mattered most to him—pigeons—and his sleepless nights working over mathematical equations and scientific problems in his head. That habit would confound scientists and scholars for decades after he died, in 1943. His inventions were designed and perfected in his imagination. Tesla believed his mind to be without equal, and he wasn’t above chiding his contemporaries, such as Thomas Edison, who...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Mars: Shadow at Point Lake

    02/05/2013 5:05:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | February 05, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What if you saw your shadow on Mars and it wasn't human? Then you might be the robotic Curiosity rover currently exploring Mars. Curiosity landed in Gale Crater last August and has been busy looking for signs of ancient running water and clues that Mars could once have harbored life. Pictured above, Curiosity has taken a wide panorama that includes its own shadow in the direction opposite the Sun. The image was taken in November from a location dubbed Point Lake, although no water presently exists there. Curiosity has already discovered several indications of dried streambeds on Mars, and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Namibian Nights

    02/04/2013 6:16:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | February 04, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Namibia has some of the darkest nights visible from any continent. It is therefore home to some of the more spectacular skyscapes, a few of which have been captured in the above time-lapse video. Visible at the movie start are unusual quiver trees perched before a deep starfield highlighted by the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. This bright band of stars and gas appears to pivot around the celestial south pole as our Earth rotates. The remains of camel thorn trees are then seen against a sky that includes a fuzzy patch on the far right that...
  • Oregon State University Wins Contract to Build New Oceanographic Research Vessels

    02/02/2013 10:37:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 1 February 2013 | Carolyn Gramling
    Enlarge Image Credit: UNOLS As many as three new coastal research vessels are slated to join the United States' oceanographic research fleet—and Oregon State University will take the lead in designing and building them, OSU President Edward Ray announced yesterday. The National Science Foundation (NSF) will give OSU an initial $3 million to coordinate the concept design; the total expected cost will be $290 million, assuming the U.S. Congress comes up with the money for the new ships. The vessels are part of a long-term plan to replace some of the vessels in the rapidly aging U.S. scientific fleet....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- L Ori and the Orion Nebula

    02/02/2013 9:25:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    NASA ^ | February 03, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This esthetic close-up of cosmic clouds and stellar winds features LL Orionis, interacting with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion's stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged Sun. As the fast stellar wind runs into slow moving gas a shock front is formed, analogous to the bow wave of a boat moving through water or a plane traveling at supersonic speed. The small, arcing, graceful structure just above and left of center is LL Ori's cosmic bow shock, measuring about half...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Herschel's Andromeda

    02/02/2013 9:46:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | February 02, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This infrared view from the Herschel Space Observatory explores the Andromeda Galaxy, the closest large spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way. Only 2.5 million light-years distant, the famous island universe is also known to astronomers as M31. Andromeda spans over 200,000 light-years making it more the twice the size of the Milky Way. Shown in false color, the image data reveal the cool dust lanes and clouds that still shine in the infrared but are otherwise dark and opaque at visual wavelengths. Red hues near the galaxy's outskirts represent the glow of dust heated by starlight to a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Atlas V Launches TDRS-K

    02/01/2013 5:09:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | February 01, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Beyond a fertile field of satellite communication antennas at Kennedy Space Center, an Atlas V rocket streaks into orbit in this long exposure photograph. In the thoughtfully composed image recorded on the evening of January 30, the antennas in the foreground bring to mind the rocket's payload, a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS; sounds like TEE-dress). This TDRS-K is the first in a next-generation series adding to the constellation of NASA's communication satellites. Operating from geosynchronous orbit 22,300 miles (36,000 kilometers) above planet Earth, the network of TDRS satellites relays communications, data, and commands between spacecraft and ground...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 4372 and the Dark Doodad

    01/31/2013 3:29:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | January 31, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The delightful Dark Doodad Nebula drifts through southern skies, a tantalizing target for binoculars in the constellation Musca, The Fly. The dusty cosmic cloud is seen against rich starfields just south of the prominent Coalsack Nebula and the Southern Cross. Stretching for about 3 degrees across this scene the Dark Doodad seems punctuated at its southern tip (lower left) by globular star cluster NGC 4372. Of course NGC 4372 roams the halo of our Milky Way Galaxy, a background object some 20,000 light-years away and only by chance along our line-of-sight to the Dark Doodad. The Dark Doodad's well...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Full Moon Silhouettes

    01/30/2013 4:35:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | January 30, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever watched the Moon rise? The slow rise of a nearly full moon over a clear horizon can be an impressive sight. One impressive moonrise was imaged two nights ago over Mount Victoria Lookout in Wellington, New Zealand. With detailed planning, an industrious astrophotographer placed a camera about two kilometers away and pointed it across the lookout to where the Moon would surely soon be making its nightly debut. The above single shot sequence is unedited and shown in real time -- it is not a time lapse. People on Mount Victoria Lookout can be seen in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Apollo 16: Driving on the Moon

    01/30/2013 4:32:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | January 29, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it be like to drive on the Moon? You don't have to guess -- humans have actually done it. Pictured above, Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charles Duke recorded video during one such drive in 1972, with a digital version now available on the web. No matter which direction it headed, the Lunar Rover traveled a path literally covered with rocks and craters. The first half of the above video shows the rover zipping about a moonscape near 10 kilometers per hour, while the second half shows a dash-cam like view. The Lunar Rover was deployed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- In the Center of the Trifid Nebula

    01/28/2013 4:16:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | January 28, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Clouds of glowing gas mingle with dust lanes in the Trifid Nebula, a star forming region toward the constellation of the Archer (Sagittarius). In the center, the three prominent dust lanes that give the Trifid its name all come together. Mountains of opaque dust appear on the right, while other dark filaments of dust are visible threaded throughout the nebula. A single massive star visible near the center causes much of the Trifid's glow. The Trifid, also known as M20, is only about 300,000 years old, making it among the youngest emission nebulae known. The nebula lies about 9,000...
  • Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever

    01/27/2013 10:33:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    The New York Times ^ | January 25, 2013 | Andrew Goldman
    As a futurist, you are famous for making predictions of when technological innovations will actually occur. Are you willing to predict the year you will die? My plan is to stick around. We’ll get to a point about 15 years from now where we’re adding more than a year every year to your life expectancy. To clarify, you’re predicting your immortality. The problem is I can’t get on the phone with you in the future and say, “Well, I’ve done it, I have lived forever,” because it’s never forever. You have described microscopic nanobots of the future that will be...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet McNaught Over Chile

    01/26/2013 9:52:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | January 27, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Comet McNaught of 2007 has been, so far, the most photogenic comet of our time. After making quite a show in the northern hemisphere in early 2007 January, the comet moved south and developed a long and unusual dust tail that dazzled southern hemisphere observers. In this image, Comet McNaught was captured above Santiago, Chile. The bright comet dominates on the left while part of its magnificent tail spreads across the entire frame. From this vantage point in the Andes Mountains, one looks up toward Comet McNaught and a magnificent sky, across at a crescent moon, and down on...
  • "Simulated Pickett N4-ES Slide Rule". (For all you egg heads.)

    01/26/2013 9:50:45 AM PST · by Islander7 · 58 replies
    AntiQuark ^ | Feb 6, 2005 | Derek
    Following up on my original post, I've scanned and virtualized my Pickett N4-ES Vector Type LOG LOG DUAL BASE SPEED RULE. That's the most complicated rule that Picket produced. It has 34 scales, which is good, because in the world of slide rule collecting, bigger is better. ().