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Keyword: science

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Like a Diamond in the Sky

    11/16/2012 9:40:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | November 17, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A dark Sun hung over Queensland, Australia on Wednesday morning during a much anticipated total solar eclipse. Storm clouds threatened to spoil the view along the northern coast, but minutes before totality the clouds parted. Streaming past the Moon's edge, the last direct rays of sunlight produced a gorgeous diamond ring effect in this scene from Ellis Beach between Cairns and Port Douglas. Winking out in a moment, the diamond didn't last forever though. The area was plunged into darkness for nearly 2 minutes as the Moon's shadow swept off shore toward Australia's Great Barrier Reef and out into...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Moon Shadow Sequence

    11/16/2012 3:17:24 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 16, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On the morning of November 14, the Moon's umbral shadow tracked across northern Australia before heading into the southern Pacific. Captured from a hilltop some 30 miles west of the outback town of Mount Carbine, Queensland, a series of exposures follows the progress of the total solar eclipse in this dramatic composite image. The sequence begins near the horizon. The Moon steadily encroaches on the on the reddened face of the Sun, rising as the eclipse progresses. At the total phase, lasting about 2 minutes for that location, an otherwise faint solar corona shimmers around the eclipsed disk. Recorded...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Solar Eclipse over Queensland

    11/15/2012 7:19:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | November 15, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This month's New Moon brought a total solar eclipse to parts of planet Earth on November 13 (UT). Most of the total eclipse track fell across the southern Pacific, but the Moon's dark umbral shadow began its journey in northern Australia on Wednesday morning, local time. From along the track, this telescopic snapshot captures the Moon's silhouette in skies over Queensland along the Mulligan highway west of Port Douglas. Almost completely covered, the Sun's disk is seen still surrounded by a hint of the faint solar corona. Planet-sized prominences stretch above the active Sun's edge. Sunlight streaming through gaps...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Our Story in One Minute

    11/14/2012 6:20:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | November 14, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Could you tell the story of human existence in a minute? This thrilling video culls together multiple teasing snippets in an attempt to do just that. And sets it to music. Briefly depicted, from start to finish, is an artistic animation of the Big Bang, a trip across the early universe, the formation of the Earth and Moon, the emergence of multi-celled life and plants, the rise of reptiles and dinosaurs, a devastating meteor strike, the rise of mammals and humans, and finally the rise of modern civilization. The minute movie ends with a flyover of the modern skyscraper...
  • Chris Matthews Claims GOP Ignorant of Science While Claiming Plants Absorb Carbon Monoxide

    11/14/2012 8:34:23 AM PST · by governsleastgovernsbest · 26 replies
    NewsBusters ^ | Mark Finkelstein
    Note to Chris Matthews: when seeking to slam Republicans for their supposed ignorance of science, try not to expose your own. On Tuesday's Hardball, Matthews—mocking the Republican congressmen vying for the chairmanship of the House Science Committee— committed this whopper: "As we all learned in grammar school—young people watching—trees absorb carbon monoxide." Uh, no, Chris. As even an MSNBC host might know, carbon monoxide is a toxic gas produced when there is insufficient oxygen to permit complete oxidation. Think running car in closed garage. Trees absorb carbon dioxide. Perhaps it was just a slip of the overworked Matthews' tongue, but...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Solar Eclipse Quilt

    11/13/2012 3:34:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | November 13, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Some people are so inspired by solar eclipses that they quilt. Pictured above is a resulting textile from one such inspiration. The 38x38 inch quilt offers impressions of a total annular eclipse, when the Moon is too far from the Earth to cover the entire Sun, witnessed in Spain in October of 2005. Today, however, a full total solar eclipse will occur, although it will only be visible to eclipse chasers and those who live in a thin swath of Australia. For a few minutes, those near the center of the eclipse path will see the entire Sun blocked...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Meteor and Moonbow over Wallaman Falls

    11/12/2012 7:49:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | November 12, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Which feature takes your breath away first in this encompassing panorama of land and sky? The competition is strong with a waterfall, meteor, starfield, and even a moonbow all vying for attention. It is interesting to first note, though, what can't be seen -- a rising moon on the other side of the camera. The bright moon not only illuminated this beautiful landscape in Queensland, Australia last June, but also created the beautiful moonbow seen in front of Wallaman Falls. Just above the ridge in the above image is the horizontal streak of an airplane. Toward the top of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Baily's Beads near Solar Eclipse Totality

    11/11/2012 4:47:17 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 11, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Just before the Sun blacks out, something strange occurs. As the Moon moves to completely cover the Sun in a total solar eclipse -- like the one set to occur over parts of Australia on Tuesday -- beads of bright sunlight stream around the edge of the Moon. This effect, known as Baily's beads, is named after Francis Baily who called attention to the phenomenon in 1836. Although, the number and brightness of Baily's beads used to be unpredictable, today the Moon is so well mapped that general features regarding Baily's beads are expected. When a single bead dominates,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Polar Ring Galaxy NGC 660

    11/10/2012 9:57:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | November 10, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: NGC 660 is featured in this cosmic snapshot, a sharp composite of broad and narrow band filter image data from the Gemini North telescope on Mauna Kea. Over 20 million light-years away and swimming within the boundaries of the constellation Pisces, NGC 660's peculiar appearance marks it as a polar ring galaxy. A rare galaxy type, polar ring galaxies have a substantial population of stars, gas, and dust orbiting in rings nearly perpendicular to the plane of the galactic disk. The bizarre-looking configuration could have been caused by the chance capture of material from a passing galaxy by a...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Melotte 15 in the Heart

    11/10/2012 9:52:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 09, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Cosmic clouds seem to form fantastic shapes in the central regions of emission nebula IC 1805. Of course, the clouds are sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from massive hot stars in the nebula's newborn star cluster, Melotte 15. About 1.5 million years young, the cluster stars are toward the right in this colorful skyscape, along with dark dust clouds in silhouette against glowing atomic gas. A composite of narrow and broad band telescopic images, the view spans about 30 light-years and includes emission from hydrogen in green, sulfur in red, and oxygen in blue hues. Wider field images...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Arp 188 and the Tadpole's Tail

    11/10/2012 9:42:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 08, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation Draco. Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One story goes that a more compact intruder galaxy crossed in front of Arp 188 - from right to left in this view - and was slung around behind the Tadpole by their gravitational attraction. During the close encounter, tidal...
  • Junk DNA Myth Continues Its Demise (article)

    11/07/2012 12:26:44 PM PST · by fishtank · 7 replies
    Junk DNA Myth Continues Its Demise by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * Secular biology, intelligent design, and creationist communities are abuzz with the recently reported data from 30 simultaneously published high-profile research papers in the field of human genomics, proclaiming that the human genome is irreducibly complex and intelligently designed.1 From an evolutionary perspective, this is a massive blow to the myth of “junk DNA.” A large-scale international research effort, ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements), began in 2003 as an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project. Although the human genome had been largely finished in its final draft form in 2004,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Superstorm Sandy From Formation to Landfall

    11/07/2012 3:24:19 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | November 07, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It was the largest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. The cost of its devastation is still unknown. Pictured above is a movie of Superstorm Sandy taken by the Earth-orbiting GOES-13 satellite over eight days in late October as the hurricane formed, gained strength, advanced across the Caribbean, moved up the Atlantic Ocean along the US east coast, made an unusual turn west, made landfall in New Jersey, turned back to the north over Pennsylvania, and then broke up moving north-east over the northern US and Canada. Although Sandy's winds were high and dangerous, perhaps even more damaging...
  • Previously unseen whale species washes up on New Zealand beach

    11/06/2012 11:46:52 AM PST · by blueplum · 30 replies
    LA Times ^ | 05 Nov 12 | Jon Bardin
    Not one but two specimens of the world’s rarest known species of whale have been discovered on a New Zealand beach, according to a report published Monday in the journal Current Biology. The species, called the spade-toothed beaked whale, is so rare that before the find researchers weren't even sure if it still existed. The two whales washed up on Opape Beach in New Zealand’s Bay of Plenty. At first scientists thought they were examples of a much more pedestrian species, the Gray’s beaked whales, which are the most commonly beached whales in the region. But after undertaking a DNA...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Methone: Smooth Egg Moon of Saturn

    11/06/2012 1:46:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 06, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why is this moon shaped like a smooth egg? The robotic Cassini spacecraft completed the first flyby ever of Saturn's small moon Methone in May and discovered that the moon has no obvious craters. Craters, usually caused by impacts, have been seen on every moon, asteroid, and comet nucleus ever imaged in detail -- until now. Even the Earth and Titan have craters. The smoothness and egg-like shape of the 3-kilometer diameter moon might be caused by Methone's surface being able to shift -- something that might occur were the moon coated by a deep pile of sub-visual rubble....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Saturn's Moon Dione in Slight Color

    11/05/2012 6:28:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | November 05, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why does one half of Dione have more craters than the other? Start with the fact that Saturn's moon Dione has one side that always faces Saturn, and one side that always faces away. This is similar to Earth's Moon. This tidal locking means that one side of Dione always leads as the moon progresses in its orbit, while the other side always trails. Dione should therefore have undergone a significant number of impacts on its leading half. Strangely, the current leading half of Dione is less cratered than the trailing half. A leading explanation is that some crater-forming...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Lenticular Clouds Over Washington

    11/04/2012 3:37:09 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | November 04, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Are those UFOs near that mountain? No -- they are multilayered lenticular clouds. Moist air forced to flow upward around mountain tops can create lenticular clouds. Water droplets condense from moist air cooled below the dew point, and clouds are opaque groups of water droplets. Waves in the air that would normally be seen horizontally can then be seen vertically, by the different levels where clouds form. On some days the city of Seattle, Washington, USA, is treated to an unusual sky show when lenticular clouds form near Mt. Rainier, a large mountain that looms just under 100 kilometers...
  • Neuroscience reveals brain differences between Republicans and Democrats

    11/03/2012 8:30:57 AM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 46 replies
    Univ. of South Carolline via MedicalXpress.com ^ | Nov. 1, 2012 | Jeff Stensland
    With the U.S. presidential election just days away, new research from the University of South Carolina provides fresh evidence that choosing a candidate may depend more on our biological make-up than a careful analysis of issues. That's because the brains of self-identified Democrats and Republicans are hard-wired differently and may be naturally inclined to hold varying, if not opposing, perceptions and values. The USC study, which analyzed MRI scans of 24 USC students, builds on existing research in the emerging field of political neuroscience. "The differences are significant and real," said lead researcher Roger D. Newman-Norlund, an assistant professor of...
  • Science Reporting No Different Than Activists' Own Hype

    11/03/2012 5:56:05 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 4 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | November 3, 2012 | Lisa De Pasquale
    Following Hurricane Sandy’s massive devastation across the northeast, many were quick to tie it to “climate change” (you know, what “global warming” and the “new ice age” used to be.). In a blog post on Tuesday, former Vice President Al Gore wrote “Hurricane Sandy is a disturbing sign of things to come. We must heed this warning and act quickly to solve the climate crisis. Dirty energy makes dirty weather.” Meghan McCain sarcastically weighed in on Twitter, “So are we still going to go with climate change not being real fellow republicans?” As his city struggles in the Sandy aftermath,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Hunter's Moon over the Alps

    11/02/2012 9:16:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | November 03, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A Full Moonset can be a dramatic celestial sight, and Full Moons can have many names. Late October's Full Moon, the second Full Moon after the northern hemisphere autumnal equinox, has been traditionally called the Hunter's Moon. According to lore, the name is a fitting one because this Full Moon lights the night during a time for hunting in preparation for the coming winter months. In this scene, last week's Hunter's Moon shines with a rich yellow light, setting as dawn comes to the Italian Alps. Topping out at over 11,000 feet, the snowy peak known as Rochemelon glows,...