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Keyword: science

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  • Science is hard: Andrea Mitchell graphic says ‘Fearless Felix traveled faster than speed of light’

    10/15/2012 1:40:50 PM PDT · by Rummyfan · 50 replies
    Twitchy ^ | 15 Oct 2012 | Twitchy
    Oh, our aching sides! As Twitchy reported yesterday, daredevil and skydiver Felix Baumgartner made his space jump, in which he hoped to travel faster than the speed of sound. Science is hard, to lapdogs. Especially for the ones at MSNBC, evidently. Sound? Light? Same difference! No need to let pesky science get in the way.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Black Sun and Inverted Starfield

    10/15/2012 3:52:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | October 15, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Does this strange dark ball look somehow familiar? If so, that might be because it is our Sun. In the above image, a detailed solar view was captured originally in a very specific color of red light, then rendered in black and white, and then color inverted. Once complete, the resulting image was added to a starfield, then also color inverted. Visible in the above image of the Sun are long light filaments, dark active regions, prominences peaking around the edge, and a moving carpet of hot gas. The surface of our Sun has become a particularly busy place...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Hubble Extreme Deep Field

    10/14/2012 3:04:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    NASA ^ | October 14, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What did the first galaxies look like? To help answer this question, the Hubble Space Telescope has just finished taking the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF), the deepest image of the universe ever taken in visible light. Pictured above, the XDF shows a sampling of some of the oldest galaxies ever seen, galaxies that formed just after the dark ages, 13 billion years ago, when the universe was only a few percent of its present age. The Hubble Space Telescope's ACS camera and the infrared channel of the WFPC3 camera took the image. Combining efforts spread over 10 years, the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxies, Stars, and Dust

    10/12/2012 9:40:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | October 13, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Spiky stars and spooky shapes abound in this deep cosmic skyscape. Its well-composed field of view covers about 2 Full Moons on the sky toward the constellation Pegasus. Of course the brighter stars show diffraction spikes, the commonly seen effect of internal supports in reflecting telescopes, and lie well within our own Milky Way galaxy. The faint but pervasive clouds of interstellar dust ride above the galactic plane and dimly reflect the Milky Way's combined starlight. Known as high latitude cirrus or integrated flux nebulae they are associated with molecular clouds. In this case, the diffuse cloud cataloged as...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Pan-STARRS and Nebulae

    10/12/2012 3:08:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | October 12, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A single image from the world's most powerful survey instrument captured this spectacular skyview. Looking toward Sagittarius, the scene spans nearly 3 degrees or six times the width of the Full Moon. At bottom, upper right, and lower left it covers the Lagoon Nebula (M8), the Trifid Nebula (M20), and NGC 6559, in the crowded, dusty starfields of the central Milky Way. The adopted color scheme shows dust reddened starlight in red hues and normally red emission from hydrogen atoms in green. Built and operated by the Pan-STARRS project, the instrument features a 1.4 gigapixel (billion pixel) digital camera...
  • The State-Sponsored Fairy Tale

    10/11/2012 12:48:23 PM PDT · by Guido2012 · 35 replies
    Set Our Children Free ^ | 10/11/12 | Tony Caruso
    Evolution is the proverbial big lie. It is told over and over again by government bureaucrats, teachers, scientists, university professors, news anchors, and others who should know better. It remains unchallenged in the public arena because no dissent is permitted to this state religion. Like most government lies, particularly those it tells school children in order to perpetuate Marxism into the next generation, the theory of evolution enjoys near-sacred politically correct status. It is not to be questioned. Those who do so will be scorned by the establishment as uneducated zealots, marginalized as pariahs in the world of political discourse,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurorae over Planet Earth

    10/11/2012 4:14:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | October 11, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: North America at night is easy to recognize in this view of our fair planet from orbit, acquired by the Suomi-NPP satellite on October 8. The spectacular waves of visible light emission rolling above the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario in the upper half of the frame are the Aurora Borealis or northern lights. Encircling the poles and extending to lower latitudes, impressive aurorae seen during the past few days are due to strong geomagnetic storms. The storms were triggered by a solar coronal mass ejection on October 4/5, impacting Earth's magnetosphere some three days later. The curtains...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Nauset Light Star Trails

    10/10/2012 6:01:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | October 10, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In myth, Atlas holds up the heavens, but in this scene they seem to pivot around a lighthouse beacon. Photographed with a camera fixed to a tripod, the well-planned 30 minute exposure records star trails in the northern sky, reflecting the daily rotation of planet Earth. Hidden behind the top of the prominent Nauset Lighthouse on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, the North Celestial Pole is at the center of all the star trail arcs. Making a complete circle, 360 degrees, in 24 hours, the star trail arcs cover 15 degrees each hour or 7.5 degrees in thirty minutes. Foreground...
  • Afterlife Exists Says Top Brain Surgeon

    10/10/2012 6:43:29 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 71 replies
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ ^ | October 10, 2012 | Mark Hughes
    Dr Eben Alexander, a Harvard-educated neurosurgeon, fell into a coma for seven days in 2008 after contracting meningitis. During his illness Dr Alexander says that the part of his brain which controls human thought and emotion "shut down" and that he then experienced "something so profound that it gave me a scientific reason to believe in consciousness after death." In an essay for American magazine Newsweek, which he wrote to promote his book Proof of Heaven, Dr Alexander says he was met by a beautiful blue-eyed woman in a "place of clouds, big fluffy pink-white ones" and "shimmering beings".
  • Mystery Behind Supernova SN 1006 Solved?

    10/09/2012 3:49:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, October 8, 2012 | Jennifer Ouellette
    Historical accounts from all over the world describe a spectacularly bright "guest star" in the night sky during the spring of 1006 -- what we now know as a supernova (SN 1006). Now astronomers think they have pinpointed the probable cause of that massive explosion, one thousand years later: a merging of two white dwarf stars. SN 1006 made quite a splash on its debut around May 1, 1006, in the constellation Lupus (the Wolf) just south of Scorpio. The critics raved! Monks in a Benedictine abbey in Switzerland marveled at the star's brightness, and commented on the variability of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant

    10/09/2012 3:52:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | October 09, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It's easy to get lost following the intricate filaments in this detailed mosaic image of faint supernova remnant Simeis 147 (S147). Also cataloged as Sh2-240, it covers nearly 3 degrees or 6 full moons on the sky. That's about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. Anchoring the frame at the right, bright star Elnath (Beta Tauri) is seen towards the boundary of the constellations Taurus and Auriga, almost exactly opposite the galactic center in planet Earth's sky. This sharp composite includes image data taken through a narrow-band filter to highlight emission from hydrogen...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Spherical Planetary Nebula Abell 39

    10/08/2012 8:17:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | October 08, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Ghostly in appearance, Abell 39 is a remarkably simple, spherical nebula about five light-years across. Well within our own Milky Way galaxy, the cosmic sphere is roughly 7,000 light-years distant toward the constellation Hercules. Abell 39 is a planetary nebula, formed as a once sun-like star's outer atmosphere was expelled over a period of thousands of years. Still visible, the nebula's central star is evolving into a hot white dwarf. Although faint, the nebula's simple geometry has proven to be a boon to astronomers exploring the chemical abundances and life cycles of stars. In this deep image recorded under...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Same Color Illusion

    10/06/2012 9:43:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | October 07, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Are square A and B the same color? They are! To verify this, either run your cursor over the image or click here to see them connected. The above illusion, called the same color illusion, illustrates that purely human observations in science may be ambiguous or inaccurate. Even such a seemingly direct perception as relative color. Similar illusions exist on the sky, such as the size of the Moon near the horizon, or the apparent shapes of astronomical objects. The advent of automated, reproducible, measuring devices such as CCDs have made science in general and astronomy in particular less...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- At the Heart of Orion

    10/06/2012 1:07:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | October 06, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Near the center of this sharp cosmic portrait, at the heart of the Orion Nebula, are four hot, massive stars known as the Trapezium. Gathered within a region about 1.5 light-years in radius, they dominate the core of the dense Orion Nebula Star Cluster. Ultraviolet ionizing radiation from the Trapezium stars, mostly from the brightest star Theta 1 Orionis C powers the complex star forming region's entire visible glow. About three million years old, the Orion Nebula Cluster was even more compact in its younger years and a recent dynamical study indicates that runaway stellar collisions at an earlier...
  • European Food Safety Authority Finds Controversial GM Study Wanting

    10/05/2012 7:03:13 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 4 October 2012 | Gretchen Vogel and Martin Enserink
    Enlarge Image Controversial kernels. The European Food Safety Authority is questioning the validity of a high-profile study that found an association between genetically modified corn and cancer in rats. Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) says a recent study on the toxicity of genetically modified maize and a common herbicide is inconclusive. The study, published on 19 September, claimed to find that rats fed genetically modified maize developed tumors at a higher rate than control animals. The study received wide press attention, although it was criticized by many scientists for its design and its...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora and Fireball Over Norway

    10/05/2012 4:40:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | October 05, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening behind that mountain? A convergence of variable sky spectacles. One night in mid-September near Tromsø, Norway, high red aurora could be seen shimmering through lower green aurora in a way that created a striking and somewhat unusual violet glow. Suddenly, though, the sky flashed with the brightest fireball the astrophotographer had ever seen, as a small pebble from outer space violently crashed into the Earth's atmosphere. The glow illuminated the distant mountain peak known as Otertinden of the Lyngen Alps. The bright meteor, which coincidently disappeared behind the same mountain, was also reflected in the foreground Signalelva...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 7293: The Helix Nebula

    10/05/2012 4:40:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | October 04, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A mere seven hundred light years from Earth, in the constellation Aquarius, a sun-like star is dying. Its last few thousand years have produced the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293), a well studied and nearby example of a Planetary Nebula, typical of this final phase of stellar evolution. A total of 58 hours of exposure time have gone in to creating this deep view of the nebula. Accumulating narrow band data from emission lines of hydrogen atoms in red and oxygen atoms in blue-green hues, it shows remarkable details of the Helix's brighter inner region, about 3 light-years across, but...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Goat Aurora Over Greenland

    10/03/2012 3:19:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | October 03, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sometimes it's hard to believe what you see in the sky. During the Shelios Expedition to Greenland in late August, even veteran sky enthusiasts saw auroras so colorful, so fast changing, and so unusual in form that they could remember nothing like it. As the ever changing auroras evolved, huge shapes spread across the sky morphed from one familiar form into another, including what looked to be the head of a goat (shown above), the head of an elephant, a strange green-tailed comet, and fingers on a celestial hand. Even without the aurora, the sky would be notable for...
  • The Atlantic: Tin Foil Hats Actually Make it Easier for the Government to Track Your Thoughts

    10/02/2012 5:58:58 PM PDT · by a fool in paradise · 25 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | Sep 28 2012, 11:38 AM ET | Matt Soniak
    ...The scientific reasoning behind the foil helmet is that it acts as a Faraday cage, an enclosure made up of a conducting material that shields its interior from external electrostatic charges and electromagnetic radiation by distributing them around its exterior and dissipating them. While sometimes these enclosures are actual cages, they come in many forms, and most of us have probably dealt with one type or another. Elevators, the scan rooms that MRI machines sit in, "booster bags" that shoplifters sometimes use to circumvent electronic security tags, cables like USB or TV coaxial cables, and even the typical household microwave...
  • Political Non-Science [ and why you're called Nazis]

    10/02/2012 4:24:34 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 34 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | October 2, 2912 | Lars Walker
    ...It's a tragedy of history that Karl Marx chose to dress his theories in the clothing of scientific analysis. Ever since his time, Marxists have built systems on his theories in the settled faith that their daring new policies must bear fruit,because they're based on "irrefutable science." And yet, time and again, those policies have failed. Science isn't supposed to work that way. So the Marxists are forced to ask, "What can explain such an anomaly? How can science be wrong?" The answer is always the same–"Wreckers have been at work. Saboteurs, ungrateful for the blessings of socialism, are conspiring...