Keyword: ringwoodite

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  • The Earth Is Eating Its Own Oceans

    11/15/2018 1:49:49 PM PST · by ETL · 40 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | Nov 14, 2018 | Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor
    As Earth's tectonic plates dive beneath one another, they drag three times as much water into the planet's interior as previously thought. Those are the results of a new paper published today (Nov. 14) in the journal Nature. Using the natural seismic rumblings of the earthquake-prone subduction zone at the Marianas trench, where the Pacific plate is sliding beneath the Philippine plate, researchers were able to estimate how much water gets incorporated into the rocks that dive deep below the surface. The find has major ramifications for understanding Earth's deep water cycle, wrote  marine geology and geophysics researcher Donna Shillington...
  • Huge 'Ocean' Discovered Inside Earth

    03/02/2007 3:27:53 PM PST · by presidio9 · 25 replies · 650+ views
    Live Science ^ | 03/02/07
    Scientists scanning the deep interior of Earth have found evidence of a vast water reservoir beneath eastern Asia that is at least the volume of the Arctic Ocean. The discovery marks the first time such a large body of water has found in the planet’s deep mantle. The finding, made by Michael Wysession, a seismologist at Washington State University in St. Louis, and his former graduate student Jesse Lawrence, now at the University of California, San Diego, will be detailed in a forthcoming monograph to be published by the American Geophysical Union. Looking down deep The pair analyzed more than...
  • Huge Aquifers Discovered Deep Under Drought-Stricken California

    06/28/2016 4:58:28 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 86 replies
    discover ^ | 06/27/2016 | Nathaniel Scharping
    The researchers compiled data from the California Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources, which tracks oil and gas wells around the state. Researchers determined if water had been detected while drilling, and also gathered data about depth, salinity and pressure. After looking at 360 oil and gas fields spread across eight counties, the researchers say that they’ve documented a trove of fresh water just over half the size of Lake Michigan hidden in California’s bedrock 1,000 to nearly 10,000 feet below the surface. This is almost three times more groundwater than what was indicated in previous studies, many conducted...
  • Study: Deep beneath the earth, more water than in all the oceans combined

    06/16/2015 1:06:54 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 69 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 6/16/15 | Terrence McCoy
    By June 16, 2014 (NASA) (Source: NASA) In the remote and forested terrain of Juina in western Brazil, an ugly rock with an uglier name surfaced months ago inside a diamond mine. It was a tiny green crystal, all scars and bumps. It “literally look[ed] like [it had] been to hell and back,” one scientist said in March. But despite the provenance, the ringwoodite stone wasn’t scorched — it was, in fact, sopping wet. Providing an unparalleled glimpse into the our planet’s innards, the stone rode a violent volcanic eruption to the surface from 325 miles inside the Earth’s mantle....
  • Amazingly, the earths water is really a miniscule amount

    05/15/2012 10:58:01 AM PDT · by central_va · 43 replies
    nasa.gov ^ | 5/15/12 | mother earth
    The blue ball represents all of the earths water. Not that much...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- All the Water on Planet Earth

    05/15/2012 4:39:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    NASA ^ | May 15, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How much of planet Earth is made of water? Very little, actually. Although oceans of water cover about 70 percent of Earth's surface, these oceans are shallow compared to the Earth's radius. The above illustration shows what would happen is all of the water on or near the surface of the Earth were bunched up into a ball. The radius of this ball would be only about 700 kilometers, less than half the radius of the Earth's Moon, but slightly larger than Saturn's moon Rhea which, like many moons in our outer Solar System, is mostly water ice. How...
  • Volume of world's oldest water estimated

    12/18/2014 1:33:29 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 51 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 December 2014 Last updated at 20:25 ET | Rebecca, BBC
    The world's oldest water, which is locked deep within the Earth's crust, is present at a far greater volume than was thought, scientists report. The liquid, some of which is billions of years old, is found many kilometres beneath the ground. Researchers estimate there is about 11m cubic kilometres (2.5m cu miles) of it - more water than all the world's rivers, swamps and lakes put together. The study was presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. It has also been published in the journal Nature. The team found that the water was reacting with the rock to release...
  • Earth May Have Created Its Own Water Deep Within; And There's Still Enough There To Fill The Pacific

    12/19/2014 7:32:52 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    hngn.com/ ^ | Dec 19, 2014 06:57 PM EST | Rebekah Marcarelli
    A team of researchers revealed evidence of an unknown geochemical pathway used by the Earth to sequester water deep within, releasing small amounts through plate tectonics in a process that feeds our oceans "from within," Ohio State University reported.
  • World's largest water reservoir found deep in earth

    06/13/2014 3:41:21 AM PDT · by rjbemsha · 32 replies
    Indo Asian News Service ^ | 13 June 2014 | Anon
    In what could quench the thirst of billions of people in the future, researchers have discovered our planet's largest water reservoir 640 km beneath our feet - bound up in rock deep in the earth's mantle. This water is not in a form familiar to us - it is not liquid, ice or vapour. This fourth form is water trapped inside the molecular structure of the minerals in the mantle rock. Scientists have been looking for this missing deep water for decades," explained geophysicist Steve Jacobsen from Northwestern University.
  • Earth may have underground 'ocean' three times that on surface

    06/13/2014 12:23:50 PM PDT · by Eurotwit · 71 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Friday 13 June 2014 04.53 BST | Melissa Davey
    Scientists say rock layer hundreds of miles down holds vast amount of water, opening up new theories on how planet formed After decades of searching scientists have discovered that a vast reservoir of water, enough to fill the Earth’s oceans three times over, may be trapped hundreds of miles beneath the surface, potentially transforming our understanding of how the planet was formed. The water is locked up in a mineral called ringwoodite about 660km (400 miles) beneath the crust of the Earth, researchers say. Geophysicist Steve Jacobsen from Northwestern University in the US co-authored the study published in the journal...
  • Rare Mineral Ringwoodite Included within Diamond Points to ‘Oceans’ beneath Earth

    06/16/2014 3:14:38 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 21 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Mar 14, 2014 | Sci-News.com
    First terrestrial discovery of an extremely rare mineral called ringwoodite confirms theory about huge water ‘reservoirs’ 410 to 660 km beneath the surface of our planet, says a team of researchers led by Prof Graham Pearson from the University of Alberta, Canada.
  • Scientists discover massive ocean of water 400 miles underground

    06/16/2014 1:51:37 PM PDT · by blueplum · 78 replies
    The Verge ^ | June 14, 2014 2:20am | Kwame Opam
    Researchers at Northwestern University have found evidence for a massive reservoir of water deep within the Earth's mantle. The reservoir, which is said to be three times the volume of the oceans on the surface, is contained within highly-pressurized rock known as ringwoodite. The scientists hope that their findings, recently published in the journal Science, can shed light on where Earth's oceans came from. THREE TIMES THE VOLUME OF THE OCEANS ON EARTH'S SURFACE The team, led by mineralogist Steven Jacobsen, used an array of 2000 seismometers to study how seismic waves generated by earthquakes move through the Earth's interior....