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Keyword: phobos

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Phobos 360

    12/24/2013 9:13:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 77 replies
    NASA ^ | December 25, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What does the Martian moon Phobos look like? To better visualize this unusual object, images from ESA's Mars Express orbiter have been combined into a virtual rotation movie. The rotation is actually a digital illusion -- tidally-locked Phobos always keeps the same face toward its home planet, as does Earth's moon. The above video highlights Phobos' chunky shape and an unusually dark surface covered with craters and grooves. What lies beneath the surface is a topic of research since the moon is not dense enough to be filled with solid rock. Phobos is losing about of centimeter of altitude...
  • Russia’s Second Shot at Phobos May Return Bits of Mars As Well

    11/11/2013 6:55:14 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    After the tragic failure of the first Phobos-Grunt mission to even make it out of low-Earth orbit, the Russian space agency (Roscosmos) is hoping to give it another go at Mars’ largest moon with the Phobos-Grunt 2 mission in 2020. This new-and-improved version of the spacecraft will also feature a lander and return stage, and, if successful, may not only end up sending back pieces of Phobos but of Mars as well. The origins of Phobos have long been a topic of planetary science debate. Did it form with Mars as a planet? Is it a wayward asteroid that ventured...
  • Discovery of 2 Monoliths,One On Mars,in 2009,& The One on Phobos,in 2007,As Revealed By Buzz Aldrin

    09/28/2013 1:04:40 PM PDT · by lbryce · 56 replies
    C-Span Video Library ^ | July 19, 2009 | Staff
    This post is a conglomeration of several articles, sources of information, on research that I've gathered, circumstances of which can be interpreted, lead to the conclusion of the seeming existence of two monoliths, uncovered in situations unrelated to each other. One of the so-called monolith-shaped objects was discovered by the Mars Global Surveyor in 2009 on the planet Mars, whereas the other so-called monolith-shaped object found located on the Martian moon of Phobos in 2007. I perused through many numerous articles to find the most straight-forward, scholarly, scientifically non-committal, links, sources of information, assiduously avoiding any histrionic, hysteria-driven conspiracy-type sources...
  • Moon Dance: Curiosity Rover Captures Movie of Phobos and Deimos Together

    08/15/2013 3:31:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 15, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    Sol 351 for the Curiosity rover on Mars was a marvelous night for a moon dance. The Mars Science Laboratory rover caught sight of Mars’ two moons, Phobos and Deimos together in the sky. And not just one image was captured: the rover’s Mast Camera captured a series of 41 images to allow the MSL team to create this timelapse movie of the dance, where the smaller moon Diemos is occulted by Phobos. To our knowledge, this the first time the two moons have been seen together in any image from the surface of Mars, let alone this sequence of...
  • Curiosity Rover Views Phobos Passing in Front of Deimos (Video)

    08/17/2013 12:47:00 PM PDT · by lbryce · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Auggust 16, 2013 | Staff
    Direct Link To VideoYouTube:Curiosity Rover Views Phobos Passing in Front of DeimosThis sped-up movie from the Curiosity rover shows Phobos (the larger of Mars’ two moons) passing in front of smaller Deimos. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems/Texas A&M Univ. Pasadena, California — The larger of the two moons of Mars, Phobos, passes directly in front of the other, Deimos, in a new series of sky-watching images from NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity. Large craters on Phobos are clearly visible in these images from the surface of Mars. No previous images from missions on the surface caught one moon eclipsing the other....
  • Curiosity Captures ‘Phobos Rising’ Movie and Sun Setting on Mars

    07/02/2013 5:26:01 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | July 3, 2013 | Ken Kremer on
    Every once in a while when the time is just right and no one is looking, Curiosity’s Earthly handlers allow her some night time Martian delights. In this case a pair of rising and setting celestial events bookend another magnificent week in humankinds exploration of the Red Planet – courtesy of NASA. This past week NASA’s Curiosity rover captured esthetically stunning imagery of Phobos rising and Our Sun setting on Mars.
  • Is Phobos a Mined Asteroid? A Sitchinite’s Take on the Hollow Object

    03/13/2013 7:44:50 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    whofortedblog.com ^ | March 11, 2013 11:56 am | Lee Covino
    On March 25, 2010, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced on their blog that ESA’s study of the mass of Phobos had been accepted for publication in the scientific journal Geophysical Research Letters. The announcement excerpted startling conclusions of ESA’s findings: “We conclude that the interior of Phobos likely contains large voids. When applied to various hypotheses bearing on the origin of Phobos, these results are inconsistent with the proposition that Phobos is a captured asteroid.” (1,2) Since that time, a number of prominent ancient astronaut blogs have had plenty to say about the findings. The ESA findings were most...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Stickney Crater

    01/18/2013 3:13:45 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    NASA ^ | January 18, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Stickney Crater, the largest crater on the martian moon Phobos, is named for Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, mathematician and wife of astronomer Asaph Hall. Asaph Hall discovered both the Red Planet's moons in 1877. Over 9 kilometers across, Stickney is nearly half the diameter of Phobos itself, so large that the impact that blasted out the crater likely came close to shattering the tiny moon. This stunning, enhanced-color image of Stickney and surroundings was recorded by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as it passed within some six thousand kilometers of Phobos in March of 2008. Even...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Phobos: Doomed Moon of Mars

    10/28/2012 11:59:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    NASA ^ | October 28, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This moon is doomed. Mars, the red planet named for the Roman god of war, has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos, whose names are derived from the Greek for Fear and Panic. These martian moons may well be captured asteroids originating in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter or perhaps from even more distant reaches of the Solar System. The larger moon, Phobos, is indeed seen to be a cratered, asteroid-like object in this stunning color image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, recorded at a resolution of about seven meters per pixel. But Phobos orbits so...
  • A Solar Eclipse - From Mars!!

    09/16/2012 3:25:30 PM PDT · by djf · 26 replies
    Truly cool! Mars Curiosity rover snapped a bunch of pics while Phobos eclipsed the sun! Youtube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHDH7cKX_SA&feature=player_embedded
  • The Shadow of Phobos:First Indirect View of Martian Solar Eclipse Published in 1999

    09/16/2012 5:13:52 PM PDT · by lbryce · 3 replies
    APOD ^ | September 17, 2012 | Staff
    Explanation: Hurtling through space above the Red Planet, potato-shaped Phobos completes an orbit of Mars in less than eight hours. In fact, since its orbital period is shorter than the planet's rotation period, Mars-based observers see Phobos rise in the west and set in the east - traveling from horizon to horizon in about 5 1/2 hours. These three images from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft record the oval shadow of Phobos racing over western Xanthe Terra on August 26, 1999. The area imaged is about 250 kilometers across and is seen in panels from left to right as...
  • World awaits crash of failed Russian Mars probe [Sunday or Monday]

    01/13/2012 6:55:58 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies · 1+ views
    msnbc ^ | 1/13/2012 12:33:38 PM ET 2012-01-13T17:33:38 | Leonard David
    A coordinated global campaign is monitoring a wayward Russian Mars probe that's slated to crash to Earth in the next few days, the European Space Agency has announced. The doomed Phobos-Grunt spacecraft, which Russian officials estimate will re-enter Earth's atmosphere between Saturday and Monday, is now officially a target for the 12-member Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee, or IADC for short. "An IADC re-entry prediction campaign is ongoing since Jan. 2. Phobos-Grunt was identified to be no high-risk object," said Heiner Klinkrad, head of the space debris office at the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Operations Center in Darmstadt,...
  • Russian probe due to 'hit Earth' January 2012

    12/23/2011 10:24:00 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 5 replies
    itn ^ | Fri Dec 23 2011 11:40
    Where and when re-entry would occur will not be known until a few days before the event, but the spacecraft is expected to arrive between January 6 and January 19. The landing zone has been calculated between latitude 51.4-N to 51.4-S, which includes the cities of London and Paris.
  • Phobos-Grunt’s Mysterious Thruster Activation: A Function of Safe Mode or Just Good Luck?

    11/16/2011 1:21:01 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    universe today ^ | on November 16, 2011 | David Warmflash
    Dr. David Warmflash, principal science lead for the US team from the LIFE experiment on board the Phobos-Grunt spacecraft, provides an update for Universe Today on the likelihood of saving the mission. The Phobos-Grunt probe is still stuck in orbit around Earth. However, periodically the spacecraft experiences a mysterious slight boost in its orbit. Following the first episode where this occurred, commentators speculated as to the cause. The activation of the spacecraft’s thrusters – the small engines that are designed to steer the craft and make small adjustments – was an obvious answer. Is spacecraft trying to save itself? The...
  • Russia takes aim at Phobos

    Mission to Martian moon is the country's first interplanetary attempt since 1996. Eric Hand 04 November 2011 Main Phobos, as seen in 2008 by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona Article tools Print Email Rights and Permissions Share/bookmark For the first time in 15 years, Russia is getting back into the business of interplanetary space science. It plans to launch an ambitious mission on 8 November to return a sample of soil from the Martian moon Phobos. The Phobos–Grunt mission (which means Phobos-soil) would welcome Russia back to the elite group of nations — the United States, Japan and...
  • Russia has ambitious space exploration plans for the current year 2011

    Russia resumes this year the exploration of far-away space, after the interruption that lasted several years. The launching of the interplanetary automatic space station Phobos-Ground is scheduled for October. It is to bring to the Earth rock samples from Phobos, satellite of Mars. The first live organisms from the Earth – some 60 of them – will be on board the space station. The Phobos-Ground is planned to be launched off Baikonur with the help of the Zenit-2SB carrier rocket within the framework of the Ground Launch international programme. It will take the space station 11 months to reach the...
  • Russia's Dark Horse Plan to Get to Mars

    05/23/2009 5:05:38 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 8 replies · 828+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 5/21/09 | Jamie Oberg
    The Fobos-Grunt mission might pave the way for humanity's first permanent space base—on Phobos, Mars' bizarre moon.Mars has been nothing but bad luck for the Russians. They have launched 20 probes to the planet since 1960, and all either failed or suffered from severe technical problems. But soon—as early as this October—Russia will attempt to reverse its fortunes with one of the most ambitious unmanned space missions ever. Instead of aiming straight for Mars, the Russians are going after Phobos, the larger of its two little satellites and one of the oddest objects around. Their probe, called Fobos-Grunt (“Phobos...
  • Is Stickney Crater an Impact Feature? (Conventional wisdom among astronomers is wrong...)

    04/17/2008 8:56:06 AM PDT · by Renfield · 7 replies · 124+ views
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | 4-14-2008 | Michael Armstrong
    HiRISE image of Stickney Crater on Phobos. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona. Stickney crater is almost half the diameter of Phobos itself. Why did the impact not shatter this small moon? The color picture above is a composite from two pictures taken about 10 minutes apart in order to give the 3-dimensional aspect. A recent Picture of the Day described some of the large-scale formations on Phobos, especially Stickney Crater, but this more dramatic picture, which has recently become available, deserves another showing because it portrays the distinctive features of an Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) event with greater clarity. The...
  • Message from a Time Traveler

    04/06/2006 4:33:24 AM PDT · by Mr170IQ · 875 replies · 25,928+ views
    Dan Simmons - Official Web Site ^ | April 1, 2006 | Dan Simmons
    The Time Traveler appeared suddenly in my study on New Year’s Eve, 2004. He was a stolid, grizzled man in a gray tunic and looked to be in his late-sixties or older. He also appeared to be the veteran of wars or of some terrible accident since he had livid scars on his face and neck and hands, some even visible in his scalp beneath a fuzz of gray hair cropped short in a military cut. One eye was covered by a black eyepatch. Before I could finish dialing 911 he announced in a husky voice that he was...
  • Mystery Object Encountered By Russian Phobos Spacecraft

    03/25/2005 9:18:52 PM PST · by vannrox · 88 replies · 5,506+ views
    Final Frontiers ^ | FR Post 3-24-05 | Tom Van Flandern
    Mystery Object Encountered By Russian Phobos Spacecraft by Tom Van Flandern, Astronomer Meta Research Martian moon Phobos and "Phobos Mystery Object", photographed in 1989 by a Russian spacecraft not long before all contact was lost. March 15, 1992 was the cover date on the first issue of a new astronomy research publication, the Meta Research Bulletin (MRB). Its purpose was to draw attention to deserving astronomy findings and ideas ignored solely because they did not fit well into mainstream models of the field. Such mainstream models include the Big Bang, the primeval Destination: Space nebula, the Oort cloud, and the...
  • Mars moon emerges from the dark

    11/11/2004 2:30:19 PM PST · by Nachum · 13 replies · 942+ views
    BBC ^ | 11-11-04 | staff
    Europe's Mars Express spacecraft has taken its most detailed image yet of the Red Planet's largest moon, Phobos. The photo was taken from a distance of about 200km (124 miles) from the irregular-shaped satellite and shows the side of the object that faces Mars. Scientists hope to explain the origin of a network of grooves that extend from the equator to the north pole. Phobos is slowly falling down to Mars and is expected to crash into the planet in the next few million years.
  • Reworked images reveal hot Venus

    01/14/2004 5:25:16 PM PST · by Central Scrutiniser · 48 replies · 1,858+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-13-03 | Dr David Whitehouse
    Reworked images reveal hot Venus By Dr David Whitehouse Mars it is not: Reprocessed Venus image As the world looks at Mars, an American scientist has produced the best images ever obtained from the surface of a rather different planet - Venus. The second planet from the Sun is blanketed with a thick layer of cloud. Computer researcher Don Mitchell used original digital data from two Soviet Venera probes that landed in 1975. His reprocessed and recalibrated images provide a much clearer view of the Venusian surface which is hotter even than the inside of a household oven. Original digital...
  • No Moon, no life on Earth, suggests theory

    03/20/2004 7:38:37 PM PST · by Leroy S. Mort · 234 replies · 1,418+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 18 March, 2004
    Without the Moon, there would have been no life on Earth. Four billion years ago, when life began, the Moon orbited much closer to us than it does now, causing massive tides to ebb and flow every few hours. These tides caused dramatic fluctuations in salinity around coastlines which could have driven the evolution of early DNA-like biomolecules. This hypothesis, which is the work of Richard Lathe, a molecular biologist at Pieta Research in Edinburgh, UK, also suggests that life could not have begun on Mars. According to one theory for the origin of life, self-replicating molecules such as DNA...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 11-29-03

    11/29/2003 2:38:27 AM PST · by petuniasevan · 9 replies · 158+ views
    NASA ^ | 11-29-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 November 29 Phobos Over Mars Credit: Viking Project, JPL NASA Explanation: Hurtling through space a mere 3,000 miles above the Martian surface, the diminutive moon Phobos (below and left of center) was imaged against the backdrop of a large shield volcano by the Viking 2 Orbiter in 1977. This dramatic picture looks down from the Orbiter's viewpoint about 8,000 miles above the volcano, Ascraeus Mons. Phobos itself...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 10-24-03

    10/23/2003 10:30:11 PM PDT · by petuniasevan · 5 replies · 253+ views
    NASA ^ | 10-24-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 October 24 Mars Moons Credit & Copyright: Johannes Schedler (Panther Observatory) Explanation: This year's record close approach of Mars inspired many to enjoy telescopic views of the red planet. But while Mars was so bright it was hard to miss, spotting Mars' two diminutive moons was still a good test for observers with modest sized instruments. Mars' moons were discovered in August of 1877 by Asaph Hall...
  • New Theory: Catastrophe Created Mars' Moons

    07/29/2003 8:56:47 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 62 replies · 1,837+ views
    space.com ^ | 29 Jul 03 | Leonard David
    New Theory: Catastrophe Created Mars' Moons By Leonard David Senior Space Writer posted: 07:00 am ET 29 July 2003 PASADENA, California – The two moons of Mars – Phobos and Deimos – could be the byproducts of a breakup of a huge moon that once circled the red planet, according to a new theory. The capture of a large Martian satellite may have taken place during or shortly after the formation of the planet, with Phobos and Deimos now the surviving remnants. Origin of the two moons presents a longstanding puzzle to which one researcher proposed the new solution at...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 7-01-03

    07/01/2003 5:11:06 AM PDT · by petuniasevan · 6 replies · 282+ views
    NASA ^ | 7-01-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 July 1 Martian Moon Phobos from MGS Credit: Malin Space Science Systems, MGS, JPL, NASA Explanation: Why is Phobos so dark? Phobos, the largest and innermost of two Martian moons, is the darkest moon in the entire Solar System. Its unusual orbit and color indicate that it may be a captured asteroid composed of a mixture of ice and dark rock. The above picture was captured recently...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-06-03

    04/05/2003 9:58:22 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 9 replies · 267+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-06-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 April 6 Phobos: Doomed Moon of Mars Credit: Viking Project, JPL, NASA; Image mosaic by Edwin V. Bell II (NSSDC/Raytheon ITSS) Explanation: This moon is doomed. Mars, the red planet named for the Roman god of war, has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos may well be captured asteroids originating in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter or perhaps from even more distant reaches of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 3-29-03

    03/28/2003 9:58:32 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 8 replies · 389+ views
    NASA ^ | 3-29-03 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the DayDiscover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2003 March 29 The Shadow of Phobos Credit: Malin Space Science Systems, MGS, JPL, NASA Explanation: Hurtling through space above the Red Planet, potato-shaped Phobos completes an orbit of Mars in less than eight hours. In fact, since its orbital period is shorter than the planet's rotation period, Mars-based observers see Phobos rise in the west and set in the east - traveling from horizon to horizon in about...