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Keyword: mycenaean

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  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • Shattered clues for solving Greek island's riddle

    12/28/2006 9:49:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 359+ views
    CNN ^ | December 26, 2006 | Associated Press
    Unlike its larger, postcard-perfect neighbors in the Aegean Sea, Keros is a tiny rocky dump inhabited by a single goatherd... more than half of all documented Cycladic figurines in museums and collections worldwide were found on Keros. Now, excavations by a Greek-British archaeology team have unearthed a cache of prehistoric statues -- all deliberately broken -- that they hope will help solve the Keros riddle... British excavation leader Colin Renfrew now believes Keros was a hugely important religious site where the smashed artwork was ceremoniously deposited.
  • Sprawling Greek monuments built 4,500 years ago on 'the world's oldest maritime sanctuary'...

    01/18/2018 9:10:25 AM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 01/18/2018 | By Harry Pettit For Mailonline
    FULL TITLE: Sprawling Greek monuments built 4,500 years ago on 'the world's oldest maritime sanctuary' reveal the impressive engineering skills of Bronze Age islanders Excavations around Keros show the technological prowess of Bronze Age Greeks Researchers found the remains of terraced walls and giant gleaming structures The structures were built using 1,000 tons of stone dug up six miles away Together they turned a tiny islet near Keros into a single, massive monument A remote Greek island known as the 'world's oldest maritime sanctuary' was once covered in complex monuments built using stone dug up six miles (10 km) away....
  • Normand Hammond

    09/04/2008 10:49:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 131+ views
    Times of London ^ | Tuesday, September 2, 2008 | Normand Hammond
    A rocky islet and a nearby hillside have yielded evidence of one of Greece's oldest and most enigmatic ritual sites. Imported stones and fragmented marble statuettes show that Dhaskalio and Kavos were "a symbolic central place for the Early Bronze Age" in the Aegean, according to Professor Colin Renfrew. Kavos is a stony, scrub-covered slope on the Cycladic island of Keros. Forty-five years ago Professor Renfrew, then a PhD student at Cambridge, found extensive looting there, with fragments of marble bowls and the famous Cycladic folded-arm figurines scattered across the surface. The date of the Dhaskalio Kavos site, based on...
  • Experts Prepare Excavation on Greek Island

    01/09/2006 9:36:16 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 13 replies · 344+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 1/9/06 | Nicholas Paphitis - ap
    ATHENS, Greece - British and Greek archaeologists are preparing a major excavation on a tiny Greek island to try to explain why it produced history's largest collection of Cycladic flat-faced marble figurines. Artwork from barren Keros inspired such artists as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore but also attracted ruthless looters. Now experts are seeking insight into the island's possible role as a major religious center of the enigmatic Cycladic civilization some 4,500 years ago. Excavations will run April through June. "Keros is one of the riddles of prehistoric archaeology," said Peggy Sotirakopoulou, curator of the Cycladic collection at the Museum...
  • 3,200-Year-Old Cyclopean Masonry Fortress... Ancient Thrace Was Part of Mycenaean Civilization [tr]

    10/27/2018 5:43:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | October 24, 2018 | Ivan Dikov (ouch!)
    An ancient fortress which is 3,000 - 3,200 years old and was built with the so called Cyclopean masonry has been found by archaeologists in Bulgaria's Rhodope Mountains, near the town of Zlatograd and the border with Greece, and is taken as evidence that Ancient Thrace was part of the Mycenaean Civilization. The previously undetected fortress is roughly dated to 1,200 BC, i.e. to the time of Ancient Troy and the Trojan War. It is located near Zlatograd, Bulgaria's southernmost town, near the southern slopes of the Rhodope Mountains, in an area that is only about 20 kilometers away from...
  • Mycenaean Tomb found intact Nemea

    10/08/2018 11:32:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Kathimerini ^ | Tuesday, October 9, 2018 | unattributed
    An intact tomb from the early Mycenaean era (1650-1400 BC) has been unearthed by archaeologists in the region of Nemea, southern Greece. According to the Culture Ministry, the tomb is among the largest ever found in the region and is set apart by the short yet wide path leading to its entrance along with other features that place it in the early phase of the Mycenaean civilization. It was found in a Mycenaean cemetery in Aidonia. The Mycenaean civilization, with its palatial states, urban organization, sophisticated art and writing system, flourished in Greece in the 17th-12th centuries BC.
  • DNA clue to origins of early Greek civilization

    08/03/2017 9:21:11 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 8/3/17 | BBC
    DNA is shedding light on the people who built Greece's earliest civilizations. Researchers analysed genetic data from skeletons dating to the Bronze Age, a period marked by the emergence of writing, complex urban planning and magnificent art and architecture. These ancient Aegean people were mostly descended from farmers who had settled the region thousands of years earlier. But they showed signs of genetic - and possibly cultural - contact with people to the north and to the east. Dr Iosif Lazaridis, from Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts, and colleagues focussed on burials from the Minoan civilization, which flourished on the...
  • Navarino Environmental Observatory: Drought ended Mycenaean era in ancient Greece

    06/03/2018 10:51:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | Tuesday, May 15, 2018 | unattributed
    The reasons for the end of the Mycenaean culture have been hotly debated among scholars. At present, there is no satisfactory explanation for the collapse of the Mycenaean palace systems. The two most common theories are population movement and internal conflict. The first attributes the destruction of Mycenaean sites to invaders. The hypothesis of a Dorian invasion, known as such in Ancient Greek tradition, that led to the end of Mycenaean Greece, is supported by sporadic archaeological evidence such as new types of burials, in particular cist graves, and the use of a new dialect of Greek, the Doric one....
  • New study finds: Ancient Mycenaean civilization might have collapsed due to uprising or invasion

    04/15/2018 3:55:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | April 10, 2018 | unattributed
    For many years, the prevailing theory on how the Mycenaean civilisation collapsed was that devastating earthquakes led to the destruction of its palaces in the Peloponnese, southern Greece around 1,200 BC. Nevertheless, new evidence suggests that some type of internal uprising or an external invasion might have brought about the downfall of the Mycenaean civilisation. From 2012, a team led by German archaeologist Joseph Maran of Heidelberg University and geophysicist Klaus-G. Hinzen has been conducting research in Tiryns and Midea. The findings of their research were published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. "Although some of the...
  • Greek Island of Santorini Volcano Erupted in 16th Century

    03/22/2014 4:46:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | March 8, 2014 | Abed Alloush
    According to a recent international study, the volcano of the island Santorini, Greece, erupted in the 16th century BC and not earlier. The survey characterized a number of research studies that took place in the past and have indicated that Santorini's volcano may have erupted a century earlier, as unreliable because the method based on tree-ring measurements that they used, could not provide them with accurate results. An international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity, that this method cannot provide...
  • Mycenaean findings: Gigantic 1250 BC building project in northern Copais

    03/25/2018 11:35:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    TornosNews ^ | Wednesday, March 21, 2018 | unattributed
    The results of the survey are particularly encouraging, as they brought to light new facts about the Middle Helladic and Early Mycenaean background of the settlements developed on the northern margin of the lake. In addition, the finding, with stratigraphic data, that the fortified settlements in the hills of Agios Ioannis and Aghia Marina have a phase of fortification, rehousing and abandonment chronologically analogous to the acropolis of Gla, ie around the middle of the 13th century BC, a milestone of the problems of the socio-political hierarchical relations of the Mycenaean northeastern coppaid field, as well as of the Orchomenos-Glas...
  • Dynasty of Priestesses [ Iron Age necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete ]

    03/02/2010 7:16:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 18,903+ views
    Archaeology ^ | March 1, 2010 | Eti Bonn-Muller
    For a quarter century, Greek excavation director Nicholas Stampolidis and his dedicated team have been unearthing the untold stories of the people buried some 2,800 years ago in the necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete. Until now, the site has perhaps been best known for the tomb its excavators dubbed "A1K1," an assemblage of 141 cremated individuals, all but two of whom were aristocratic men who likely fell in battle in foreign lands. Excavated between 1992 and 1996, this elaborate rock-cut tomb was brimming with fantastic burial goods that date from the ninth to the seventh century B.C.,...
  • Cretan Excavation Sheds New Light On Dark Ages Of Greek History

    12/07/2004 1:44:53 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 920+ views
    Kathimerini (English Edition) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Cretan excavation sheds light on Dark Ages of Greek historyFinds from ancient Eleutherna at Cycladic Museum A marble statue of Aphrodite, from a second- to first-century-BC bathhouse in Eleutherna. By Nicholas Paphitis - Kathimerini English Edition On a narrow spur under the shadow of Mount Ida in central Crete, archaeologists for the past 20 years have been excavating a town that flourished from the Dark Ages of Greece’s early history until Medieval times. The Eleutherna project, a systematic dig carried out by a three-pronged team of top archaeologists from the University of Crete, is in itself unusual in a country...
  • Archaeologists On Crete Find Skeleton Covered With Gold Foil In 2,700-year-old Grave

    10/01/2010 2:54:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Canadian Press via Google News ^ | Tuesday, September 28, 2010 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Excavator Nicholas Stampolidis said his team discovered more than 3,000 pieces of gold foil in the 7th-century B.C. twin grave near the ancient town of Eleutherna... The tiny gold ornaments, from 1 to 4 centimetres (0.4 to 1.5 inches) long, had been sewn onto a lavish robe or shroud that initially wrapped the body of a woman and has almost completely rotted away but for a few off-white threads... The woman, who presumably had a high social or religious status, was buried with a second skeleton in a large jar sealed with a stone slab weighing more than half a...
  • Minoan Frescoes at Tel Kabri: Aegean Art in Bronze Age Israel

    07/21/2013 3:42:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 6/21/2013 | Noah Wiener
    Over 100 years of excavations on Crete have exposed elegant Minoan frescoes that once adorned the walls of the island’s Bronze Age palaces. This distinctively colorful Aegean art style flourished in the Middle Bronze Age (1750-1550 B.C.). The nearby inhabitants of Akrotiri, a city on the Cycladic island of Thera (modern Santorini), painted numerous artworks in the style of the Minoan frescoes before the island was decimated by a volcanic eruption in the late 17th or 16th century B.C. Until recently, there was no archaeological evidence of Minoan frescoes beyond the islands of the Aegean. Art exhibiting Aegean characteristics has...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Necropolis with more than 100 Tombs Discovered Near Bethlehem

    03/07/2016 4:26:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | March 8, 2016 | M.R. Reese
    By studying and excavating ancient burial grounds, we can learn about how final respects were paid when people died during ancient times. The artifacts located alongside these remains also provide insight into what items people valued and what they believed about the afterlife. A 2013 discovery of an ancient burial ground near Bethlehem is providing new information about one civilization that lived approximately 4000 years ago. In 2013, efforts began to build an industrial park near Bethlehem, leading to a discovery that may prove to offer fresh insights about the ancient world. The area where the industrial park was to...
  • Bronze-Age Cemetery Discovered Near Bethlehem

    03/06/2016 6:20:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, March 04, 2016 | editors / LiveScience
    A 4,000-year-old cemetery made up of more than 100 tombs has been found near Bethlehem in the West Bank. Now known as Khalet al-Jam'a, the cemetery probably served an undiscovered settlement for more than 1,500 years. Many of its tombs have been destroyed by modern construction or looting, but at least 30 tombs have survived. Many of them are shaft tombs with one or more rock-cut chambers. According to Lorenzo Nigro of Sapienza University of Rome, the settlement was situated near trade routes, and artifacts from the tombs indicate that it had been a wealthy place. "Typical pieces of the...
  • FSU classics professor exploring a 'lost' city of the Mycenaeans

    03/11/2008 2:14:10 PM PDT · by decimon · 8 replies · 561+ views
    Florida State University ^ | March 11, 2008 | Unknown
    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Along an isolated, rocky stretch of Greek shoreline, a Florida State University researcher and his students are unlocking the secrets of a partially submerged, “lost” harbor town believed to have been built by the ancient Mycenaeans nearly 3,500 years ago. “This is really a remarkable find,” said Professor Daniel J. Pullen, chairman of FSU’s Department of Classics. “It is rare indeed to locate an entire town built during the Late Bronze Age that shows this level of preservation.” Pullen and a colleague, Assistant Professor of Classical Studies Thomas F. Tartaron of the University of Pennsylvania, led students...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....