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Keyword: medicine

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  • Green Tea Eyed As Possible Skin Cancer Treatment

    08/23/2012 2:20:57 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 6 replies
    Medical Daily ^ | August 22, 2012 | Christine Hsu
    Scientists have discovered a chemical extract in green tea that can treat two types of skin cancer, without producing the harmful side effects associated with chemotherapy.While the epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) compound is too weak to make an impact when consumed in tea, scientists were able to kill or shrink two-thirds of cancer cells within a month when they applied the extract to tumor cells in the lab. What's more, the chemical compound did not appear to affect any other healthy cells or tissues in the body.Researchers from the universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow believe that their study is the first...
  • Dealing With Medical Emergencies (preppers)

    08/20/2012 8:52:47 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 22 replies
    Personal Liberty Digest ^ | August 20, 2012 | Bob Livingston
    The prepper can take many lessons from the situation that developed in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. One lesson is that when the social order breaks down for a period of days or weeks, adequate medical care will disappear. So preparedness requires a medical kit. And no medical survival kit is complete without a good book or two on emergency medicine, anatomy, drug reference and medical terminology. Some good ones to choose from are:
  • How Obamacare's $716 Billion in Cuts Will Drive Doctors Out of Medicare

    08/20/2012 4:50:47 AM PDT · by NCjim · 66 replies
    Forbes ^ | August 20, 2012
    There are 600,000 physicians in America who care for the 48 million seniors on Medicare. Of the $716 billion that the Affordable Care Act cuts from the program over the next ten years, the largest chunk—$415 billion—comes from slashing Medicare’s reimbursement rates to doctors, hospitals, and nursing homes. This significant reduction in fees is driving many doctors to stop accepting new Medicare patients, making it harder for seniors to gain access to needed care. Here are a few of their stories. Paul Wertsch is a primary physician in Madison, Wisconsin. In 1977, he and his two partners invested $500,000 of...
  • Diacetyl chemical in artificial butter popcorn linked to Alzheimer's plaque build-up (microwave)

    08/12/2012 10:20:39 AM PDT · by UnwashedPeasant · 12 replies
    CBS news ^ | 8/9/12
    (CBS News) An ingredient used in artificial butter flavoring for popcorn may worsen the effects of an abnormal brain protein that's been linked to Alzheimer's disease. A new study in Chemical Research in Toxicology examined diacetyl (DA), an ingredient used to produce the buttery flavor and smell in microwave popcorn, margarine, candy, baked goods, and even pet food. It is also created naturally in fermented drinks like beer, and gives some chardonnay wines its buttery taste, according to the study. Scientists at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis conducted an analysis of DA, a chemical which previously has been linked...
  • BCG Vaccine May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

    08/11/2012 12:02:01 PM PDT · by Innovative · 18 replies
    Voice of America ^ | Aug 11, 2012 | Vidushi Sinha
    One of the world's oldest vaccines now has a new use. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin, or BCG, is an 80-year-old vaccine designed to tread tuberculosis. Bit it has now been found effective in treating long-term type 1 diabetes, which is on the rise worldwide. BCG has long been administered to children in developing countries to guard against tuberculosis. But in a recent clinical trial, researchers at Harvard Medical School found the vaccine was also able to increase insulin production in patients with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Denise Faustman, the lead researcher, says the team was able to cure type 1 diabetes in...
  • Obamacare Causes Doctor Shortage – Dick Morris TV: Lunch Alert!

    08/09/2012 8:30:25 AM PDT · by Signalman · 3 replies
    Dick Morris ^ | 8/9/2012 | Dick Morris
    Dear Friend, In this video commentary, I discuss how Obamacare is triggering a national doctor shortage, decreasing the quality of care for us all. Tune in!
  • Researchers discover gene that permanently stops cancer cell proliferation

    08/08/2012 12:28:15 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Medical Express ^ | 08-01-2012 | Provided by Case Western Reserve University
    Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered a mutant form of the gene, Chk1, that when expressed in cancer cells, permanently stopped their proliferation and caused cell death without the addition of any chemotherapeutic drugs. This study illustrates an unprecedented finding, that artificially activating Chk1 alone is sufficient to kill cancer cells. "We have identified a new direction for cancer therapy and the new direction is leading us to a reduction in toxicity in cancer therapy, compared with chemotherapy or radiation therapy," said Dr. Zhang, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacology at the School of Medicine, and...
  • Advice from a Physician: How to Avoid Obamacare

    08/07/2012 10:39:09 AM PDT · by arthurus · 40 replies
    Economic Policy Journal ^ | August 4, 2012 | Robert Wenzel
    Medical care is going to get worse under Obamacare. Robert S. Dotson, M.D. tells us why: As income reductions are being imposed on private practice, costs are being driven up by exploding regulations. In addition, the plethora of new mandates and laws have increasingly criminalized every aspect of the practice of medicine and created vast new armies of armed bureaucrats whose sole aim is to impose civil and criminal penalties on any provider unlucky enough to be singled out for attention... New restrictions, rules, and regulations on healthcare – on providers and patients alike – have imposed legal constraints with...
  • Chemo 'undermines itself' through rogue response (Could make cancer more resistant to treatment)

    08/06/2012 2:33:57 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    BBC ^ | 08/06/2012
    Chemotherapy can undermine itself by causing a rogue response in healthy cells, which could explain why people become resistant, a study suggests. The treatment loses effectiveness for a significant number of patients with secondary cancers. Writing in Nature Medicine, US experts said chemo causes wound-healing cells around tumours to make a protein that helps the cancer resist treatment. A UK expert said the next step would be to find a way to block this effect. Around 90% of patients with solid cancers, such as breast, prostate, lung and colon, that spread - metastatic disease - develop resistance to chemotherapy. Treatment...
  • Chemotherapy Can Backfire and Boost Cancer Growth: Study

    08/05/2012 6:57:19 PM PDT · by dubyagee · 56 replies
    Yahoo ^ | August 5, 2012 | AFP
    Cancer-busting chemotherapy can cause damage to healthy cells which triggers them to secrete a protein that sustains tumour growth and resistance to further treatment, a study said Sunday. Researchers in the United States made the "completely unexpected" finding while seeking to explain why cancer cells are so resilient inside the human body when they are easy to kill in the lab. They tested the effects of a type of chemotherapy on tissue collected from men with prostate cancer, and found "evidence of DNA damage" in healthy cells after treatment, the scientists wrote in Nature Medicine. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/chemotherapy-backfire-boost-cancer-growth-study-164516832.html
  • Eye spy cyanide

    08/05/2012 3:43:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 24 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 3 August 2012 | Francesca Burgoyne poisoning
    The two-step method to detect cyanide. (A) Adding a chemosensor to a blood sample, followed by extracting the purple chemosensor–cyano complex from the sample. (B) Washing the column with water The colour of cyanide poisoning is purple, according to researchers in Switzerland who have developed a method that enables them to quickly detect blood cyanide levels through a simple colour change. Cyanide poisoning as a result of smoke inhalation can have serious or fatal consequences unless an antidote is rapidly administered. Current methods for determining cyanide poisoning, including microdiffusion, microdistillation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection, can take up to an...
  • Bacteria-immune system 'fight' can lead to chronic diseases, study suggests

    08/04/2012 7:16:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 2, 2012 | NA
    Results from a study conducted at Georgia State University suggest that a "fight" between bacteria normally living in the intestines and the immune system, kicked off by another type of bacteria, may be linked to two types of chronic disease. The study suggests that the "fight" continues after the instigator bacteria have been cleared by the body, according to Andrew Gewirtz, professor of biology at the GSU Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection. That fight can result in metabolic syndrome, an important factor in obesity, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The results were published in the journal Cell Host &...
  • Squabble Over NEJM Paper Puts Spotlight on Antishock Drug

    08/04/2012 1:34:09 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 2 August 2012 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    A seemingly small mistake in a paper in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) landed a Danish physician-researcher in hot water last month after a German company threatened to sue him for potential losses that could run in the millions of dollars. The exchange prompted media consternation in Denmark over whether academic freedom was being censored, but the researcher, Anders Perner of Copenhagen University Hospital has corrected the error, which occurred in the publication of a study of a widely used drug to prevent shock, and thereby averted legal action. Still, the episode has shone a light on a...
  • Evidence Grows That Cancer Has Its Own Stem Cells

    08/01/2012 1:45:54 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    US News – HealthDay ^ | August 1, 2012 | Lisa Esposito
    While scientists hotly debate the existence of cancer stem cells, three related new studies, all conducted on mice, provide some supporting evidence. Stem cells are the foundation for healthy cell growth in the body. Some researchers believe that malignant stem cells also exist—so-called cancer stem cells that generate tumors and resist treatment by simply re-growing afterward. "Cancer stem cells are still controversial, but with progress in studies like these, it's less about whether they exist and more about 'what does this mean?'" said Dr. Max Wicha, director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, who is familiar with the...
  • How Come People Rarely Die of Dementia in Poor Countries?

    07/31/2012 10:28:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    PJMedia ^ | 07/31/2012 | THEODORE DALRYMPLE
    When I was a young doctor working in poor countries, I made a casual observation that old people in them did not seem to suffer very often from dementia. It occurred to me that properly conducted surveys, of the kind that I was not suited to performing, might be valuable, because a difference in the incidence and prevalence of dementia in various countries might offer a clue to the cause of the disease. As populations throughout the world age, this is a matter of increasing importance.But was my initial casual observation true? And, if true, might the explanation not be...
  • Rationing Begins: States Limiting Drug Prescriptions for Medicaid Patients

    07/31/2012 9:04:32 AM PDT · by IbJensen · 43 replies
    CNS News ^ | 7/30/2012 | Melanie Hunter
    CNSNews.com) – Sixteen states have set a limit on the number of prescription drugs they will cover for Medicaid patients, according to Kaiser Health News. Seven of those states, according to Kaiser Health News, have enacted or tightened those limits in just the last two years. Medicaid is a federal program that is carried out in partnership with state governments. It forms an important element of President Barack Obama's health-care plan because under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act--AKA Obamcare--a larger number of people will be covered by Medicaid, as the income cap is raised for the program. With...
  • Britain’s NHS: No Fun and Games (Why on earth was the NHS celebrated in the London Olympics?)

    07/30/2012 9:46:30 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 29 replies
    National Review ^ | 07/30/2012 | John Fund
    The International Olympic Committee decided not to include in the opening ceremony a moment of silence to honor the eleven Israeli athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen during the 1972 games in Munich. That move drew the ire of NBC’s Bob Costas. During Friday’s ceremony, he commented that, although a private moment of silence was held before a mere 100 people this week at the Athlete’s Village, “for many, tonight, with the world watching, is the true time and place to remember those who were lost and how and why they died.” Instead, the Olympic ceremony featured a weird, politically correct...
  • Doctor of Colorado suspect had been disciplined by medical board

    07/29/2012 1:37:33 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 55 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 29, 2012 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
    <p>AURORA, Colo. -- Dr. Lynne Fenton, the University of Colorado psychiatrist who was treating James E. Holmes, according to a court filing by his attorneys, was disciplined by the Colorado Medical Board in 2005.</p> <p>Fenton was also reprimanded for failing to maintain a medical chart or to enter appropriate entries for the charts relating to herself, her husband or the employee, 7News reported.</p>
  • 'Bionic eye' implant restores sight

    07/23/2012 12:13:06 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Guide and Gazette ^ | July 23, 2012
    BBC News today reported that “two blind British men have had electronic retinas fitted”. Chris James, 54, and Robin Millar, 60, took part in a clinical trial coordinated by Oxford University and funded by the National Institute of Health Research. Both men have retinitis pigmentosa, a rare hereditary condition that causes gradual deterioration of the light-detecting cells in the retina, which can lead to blindness. The electronic retinas are implants containing light detectors designed to replace the lost light-detecting cells. Immediately following the procedures, when the implants were switched on, both men were able to detect light and are now...
  • Report: 83 percent of doctors have considered quitting over Obamacare

    07/09/2012 11:54:34 AM PDT · by Nachum · 27 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 7/9/12 | Sally Neilson
    Eighty-three percent of American physicians have considered leaving their practices over President Barack Obama’s health care reform law, according to a survey released by the Doctor Patient Medical Association. The DPMA, a non-partisan association of doctors and patients, surveyed a random selection of 699 doctors nationwide. The survey found that the majority have thought about bailing out of their careers over the legislation, which was upheld last month by the Supreme Court. Even if doctors do not quit their jobs over the ruling, America will face a shortage of at least 90,000 doctors by 2020. The newly passed health care...
  • Synthetic protein kick-starts the immune system to prevent all strains of the flu

    07/09/2012 10:44:45 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 7 replies
    Gizmag / Dan Diego State University ^ | July 09, 2012 | Darren Quick
    We've seen promising moves towards developing a universal or near-universal influenza vaccine, but researchers at the Donald P. Shiley BioScience Center have taken a different tack to ward of the crafty virus. Although the flu virus actively keeps the immune system from detecting it for a few days, giving it time to gain a foothold, the researchers have found that a powerful synthetic protein, known as EP67, can kick start the immune system so that it reacts almost immediately to all strains of the virus. Previously, EP67 had primarily been used to help activate the immune response by being added...
  • Henninger: ObamaCare's Lost Tribe: Doctors

    07/08/2012 5:47:58 PM PDT · by george76 · 9 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | July 5, 2012 | Henninger
    Back at the at the dawn of ObamaCare in June 2009, speaking to the American Medical Association's annual meeting, President Obama said: "No matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise: If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor. Period." But will your doctor be able to keep you? Or will your doctor even want to keep you, rather than quit medicine? ... Have you noticed what got lost in this historic rumble? Doctors. Remember them? ObamaCare has been a war over the processing of insurance claims. It has been fought by...
  • Child heart surgery units to learn fate (UK to close 40% if units)

    07/04/2012 6:01:30 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | July 4, 2012 | By Nick Triggle
    The hospitals that perform child heart surgery are due to learn which will have to stop performing operations. There are 10 units in England, but an official consultation has proposed up to four should cease doing surgery. The NHS review was carried out amid fears expertise was spread too thinly, and has already concluded surgery should be concentrated on fewer sites. Centres in Leicester, Leeds, Newcastle, Southampton, Bristol and London are under threat.
  • The Healthcare Myths We Must Confront

    06/29/2012 7:28:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    The American ^ | June 29, 2012 | Cliff Asness
    As debate about whether ObamaCare is a good idea continues, rejecting four major misconceptions about healthcare is crucial to any chance of our eventually emerging with a better system. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ObamaCare decision, we must refocus. The Court’s decision was never about whether ObamaCare was a good idea, only about whether it was constitutional. The Court found a convoluted way to uphold the law.That’s done, but the debate on whether ObamaCare’s provisions are good ideas will continue. To date, this debate has been unable to shake off a lot of mythology—things believed about healthcare and...
  • The Changing of the Guards - Not Good

    06/29/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT · by Accepting The Truth · 31 replies
    6/28/2012 | Betty Harmon
    I never will forget when I persuaded my husband to vote for Obama as I just knew he was THE man. Now, I feel guilty and cannot believe that I was so taken in by his smoothe personality and the moment. When I hear comments that our country is spiraling out of control I now connect the dots and think of it as a battle already lost to one that doesn’t deserve it. We’ve become a gullible people and are deceived by a selfish and materialistic world. We look over the rough spots because we cannot look upon the truth...
  • How little government sponsored Healthcare do we need? {Vanity}

    06/25/2012 1:20:10 AM PDT · by Cronos · 17 replies
    Cronos ^ | 19 June 2012 | Cronos
    I've been thinking about this for years and want to get my fellow Freeper's opinions --> how little healthcare/medicare do we need as a nation?There are two extremes: government is not involved in any medicare at all, or the other extreme is ObamacareAs a young adult, I'm inclined to the zero government, zero tax-money going to healthcare/medicare. However, I also believe that we young have an obligation to take care of our parents and our other aged relatives. That being said, I look on it as a Christian duty, separate from gubmint. What do you freepers think? Where along the...
  • Tumor op in womb saves fetus

    06/24/2012 2:09:48 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    BBC News ^ | 22 June 2012 | Last updated at 05:15 ET
    Surgeons have removed a tumor from the mouth of a fetus, in what has been described as a "world first" procedure. After a scan at 17 weeks, mother Tammy Gonzalez said she "could see a bubble" coming out of her baby's mouth. Doctors said it was a very rare tumor called an oral teratoma and there was little chance her daughter would survive. After the pioneering operation, baby Leyna was born five months later. Doctors at the Jackson Memorial Hospital in Florida, said this type of tumor was so rare it had been seen only once in 20 years at...
  • Surgery Removed Rare Tumor in Utero [Media Admits Womb-Dwellers Are Persons!]

    06/22/2012 5:56:04 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    NBC MIAMI ^ | 6/21/12 | DIANA GONZALEZ
    Leyna Gonzalez is now a happy, active 20-month-old. However, when she was in her mother's womb a rare tumor was rapidly growing in her mouth. But in the first case of its kind, UM/Jackson fetal surgeons were able to penetrate the amniotic sac with a small scope and successfully remove the tumor in utero. The tumor can easily be seen in a routine ultrasound taken at 17 weeks.
  • Alzheimer's gene 'diabetes link'

    06/21/2012 7:49:52 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 11 replies
    BBC ^ | June 15, 2012 | BBC
    Scientists say they have identified a possible genetic link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. It has been known for some time that people with diabetes have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's, but not why this is so.Now US researchers writing in Genetics say a study of worms has indicated a known Alzheimer's gene also plays a role in the way insulin is processed. ..... < snip > ..... A key indication of Alzheimer's, which can only be seen after death, is the presence of sticky plaques of amyloid protein in decimated portions of patients' brains. Scientists have already...
  • Notebooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic’s Contested Discovery

    06/17/2012 7:36:45 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 11, 2012 | PETER PRINGLE
    NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — For as long as archivists at Rutgers University could remember, a small cardboard box marked with the letter W in black ink had sat unopened in a dusty corner of the special collections of the Alexander Library. Next to it were 60 sturdy archive boxes of papers, a legacy of the university’s most famous scientist: Selman A. Waksman, who won a Nobel Prize in 1952 for the discovery of streptomycin, the first antibiotic to cure tuberculosis. The 60 boxes contained details of how streptomycin was found — and also of the murky story behind it, a...
  • ER doctor's quick action saved life of 8-year-old girl Girl sent to Detroit

    06/10/2012 1:50:46 PM PDT · by Former Proud Canadian · 82 replies
    Windsor Star ^ | June 8, 2012 | Monica Wolfson
    A critically ill eight-year-old child is alive today because a Windsor emergency room doctor refused to wait for provincial approval to send the child to a Detroit hospital, according to the patient’s mother and hospital doctor. “She needed emergency surgery and if you don’t operate she was going to die,” said Dr. David Adekoya, Windsor Regional Hospital’s chief of emergency surgery who was at the hospital when the girl was treated. “She needed to be at a facility within an hour. We needed to make a decision and not wait around.” .... After the transfer to Detroit was arranged, CritiCall...
  • Psychiatric Drug May Kill Cancer Stem Cells

    05/31/2012 11:44:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 24 May 2012 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    Enlarge Image Root killer. Cancer-like stem cells treated with the antipsychotic drug thioridazine (right) are scarce compared with control cells. Credit: E. Sachlos et al., Cell, 149 (8 June), ©2012 Elsevier Inc. A well-known drug for treating schizophrenia may be a cancer killer, too. In lab studies, the drug wiped out a precursor to leukemia cells without harming normal cells. That means it could give doctors a long-sought way to eliminate every trace of leukemia in patients so that the cancer can never come back. Even though surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can get rid of a tumor or leukemia...
  • Chagas: Is tropical disease really the new AIDS?

    05/31/2012 10:53:19 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 15 replies
    Chagas, a tropical disease spread by insects, is causing some fresh concern following an editorial—published earlier this week in a medical journal—that called it "the new AIDS of the Americas." More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States. The editorial, published by the Public Library of Science's Neglected Tropical Diseases, said the spread of the disease is reminiscent of the early years of HIV. "There are a number of striking similarities between people living with Chagas disease and people living with...
  • Tumor Blocker May Fight Fibrosis

    05/30/2012 10:29:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 30 May 2012 | Mitch Leslie
    Enlarge Image Thick-skinned. Fragments of the anticancer drug endostatin can halt fibrosis in a slab of human skin. Credit: Feghali-Bostwick Laboratory Connective tissue holds our bodies together, but in a condition called fibrosis, an overabundance of the material devastates organs such as the liver, heart, and lungs. A new study suggests that fragments of a promising cancer drug can rein in fibrosis, which is currently untreatable. Fibrosis occurs when cells pump out excess collagen and other connective tissue proteins, which harm organs. Pulmonary fibrosis, for example, stiffens the lungs, eventually suffocating patients unless they receive a lung transplant. In...
  • Debt-Hit Greece 'Running Out Of Medication'

    05/29/2012 10:19:11 AM PDT · by tcrlaf · 29 replies
    SKY ^ | 5-25-12 | Jason Ferrell
    Pharmacies in Greece were on strike earlier this week in protest at the government not paying them for medicines that should be free to customers. Many pharmacies now have huge debts to pharmaceutical companies for drugs they have handed out free of charge. Sky News spoke to one pharmacist who has not been paid by the state for over a year. Evaggelina Rousi, who runs a chemist in Athens, said: "The government owes us 30,000 euros but we have not been paid by them for a year and a half. Many people who rely on regular medication are at risk....
  • Stem cell treatment regrows Whitfield man's foot

    05/29/2012 5:45:45 AM PDT · by GrootheWanderer · 21 replies
    The (Dalton, Georgia) Daily Citizen ^ | 05-28-2012 | Charles Oliver
    By the time Dr. Spencer Misner had carved away the dead and diseased flesh from Bobby Rice’s right foot last year, little remained other than bones and tendons. “I couldn’t believe it. It didn’t look real. It looked like something out of a movie,” recalled Rice, a Whitfield County resident. Today, the ankle has almost completely healed. It looks like Rice had simply scraped it. And Rice’s foot has largely healed, too. Misner credits cutting-edge stem cell treatments for saving Rice’s foot and leg.
  • High School Freshman Wins Award For Pancreatic Cancer Test

    05/23/2012 5:01:12 AM PDT · by Puzzleman · 48 replies
    WBAL News ^ | May 22, 2012 | Robert Lang
    He is only a freshman at North County High School in Anne Arundel County. However, 15-year-old Jack Andraka is being recognized for developing what may become an effective way to detect pancreatic cancer.
  • Coffee drinking linked to longer life

    05/17/2012 5:49:05 PM PDT · by Innovative · 65 replies
    CNN ^ | May 17, 2012 | By Amanda Gardner, Health.com
    Drinking a daily cup of coffee -- or even several cups -- isn't likely to harm your health, and it may even lower your risk of dying from chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests. NIH followed 400,000 men and women for 13 years, during which 13% died. In the study, both regular and decaf were associated with a lower risk of dying Overall, coffee drinkers were less likely than their peers to die during the study, and the more coffee they drank, the lower their mortality risk...
  • SIMPLE WOUND CLOSURE 101:

    04/11/2012 6:36:32 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 33 replies
    Modern Survival Online ^ | 4/11/12 | Doc Morgan
    here are essentially two ways to heal a wound: 1) Primary intent: bringing the wound edges together via bandage, suture, or glue. 2) Secondary intent: allowing the wound to heal “as is” when primary intent is not indicated (such as a very contaminated, dirty wound with multiple deep entry points). It’s important to close a wound by primary intent for several reasons: 1) Hemostasis (stopping bleeding): because if you lacerated a vessel with your injury, you will need to ligate it somehow. Granted, if you lacerate a major artery, you will just need to apply pressure because ligating it may...
  • Blogger threatened with jail for writing on health

    05/01/2012 6:46:00 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 34 replies
    WND.com ^ | April 30, 2012 | Jack Minor
    A blogger in North Carolina has been threatened with jail time for “practicing nutrition without a license” by writing about his experiences with diabetes and telling readers what types of food he was eating. It was in January when the North Carolina Board of Dietetics and Nutrition told blogger Steve Cooksey, who writes at diabetes-warrior.net, that it was investigating him for providing nutrition care services without a license. Cooksey was accused of violating Chapter 90, Article 25 of the North Carolina General Statutes, which makes it a misdemeanor to “practice dietetics or nutrition” without state permission – a license. According...
  • Dad rescues ‘brain dead’ son from doctors wishing to harvest his organs...

    04/26/2012 6:52:49 AM PDT · by SumProVita · 102 replies
    LifeSite News ^ | April 25, 2012 | Matthew Cullinan Hoffman
    ...boy recovers completely Although a team of four physicians insisted that his son was “brain-dead” following the wreck, Thorpe’s father enlisted the help of a general practitioner and a neurologist, who demonstrated that his son still had brain wave activity. The doctors agreed to bring him out of the coma, and five weeks later Thorpe left the hospital, having almost completely recovered.
  • Nanomaterials offer hope for cerebral palsy

    04/25/2012 12:50:37 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature News ^ | 18 April 2012 | Amy Maxmen
    Rabbits with brain injuries hop again after treatment with dendrimers. By tacking drugs onto molecules targeting rogue brain cells, researchers have alleviated symptoms in newborn rabbits that are similar to those of cerebral palsy in children. Cerebral palsy refers to a group of incurable disorders characterized by impairments in movement, posture and sensory abilities. In general, medicines tend to act broadly rather than influence certain sets of cells in the brain. “You don’t expect large molecules to enter the brain, and if they do, you don’t expect them to target specific cells, and immediately act therapeutically — but all of...
  • Cheney File Traces Heart Care Milestones

    04/24/2012 3:35:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 23, 2012 | LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN, M.D.
    WASHINGTON — For a man who has long battled advanced heart disease, Dick Cheney has had a remarkable streak of being in the right place at the right time. Now 71, the former vice president has survived five heart attacks, the first of them at the age of 37. Even before he received a heart transplant a month ago today, Mr. Cheney had benefited from just about every procedure, technology and class of drug available to people with his condition — atherosclerosis, in which fatty deposits block blood flow in the arteries. Indeed, Mr. Cheney’s medical history could almost be...
  • Building a 21st Century FDA A better way to fast track new pills for old ills

    04/24/2012 3:13:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Reason ^ | April 24, 2012 | Ronald Bailey
    “FDA is relying on 20th century regulatory science to evaluate 21st century medical products,” declared Food and Drug Administration Commissioner (FDA) Margaret Hamburg back in October 2010. One result: As biotech and medical discoveries accelerate, the number of new drugs approved by the agency remains basically flat. A 2010 study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas found that the time from drug discovery to marketing increased from eight years in 1960 to 12 to 15 years in 2010. Five years of this increase results from new regulations boosting the...
  • The Wrong Way to Stop Fake Drugs

    04/23/2012 8:22:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 22, 2012 | ROGER BATE
    IN 2007-8, when counterfeit versions of heparin, a blood-thinning drug, were shipped from China to the United States market, 149 people died. In the last few months, bogus versions of the cancer drug Avastin, apparently shipped from the Middle East, have surfaced in clinics in California, Illinois and Texas. Thankfully, so far as we know, they haven’t killed anyone, but more and more cases of dangerous fake drugs are being reported by the Food and Drug Administration. Numerous incidents surely go unreported, the evidence swallowed, the deaths incorrectly attributed to natural causes. Fighting the fake-drug menace is like playing whack-a-mole....
  • The Medicalization of Rebellion - The long, shameful history of using science to stigmatize dissent

    04/23/2012 7:02:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Reason ^ | April 21, 2012 | Sheldon Richman
    In 1861 Samuel A. Cartwright, an American physician, described a mental illness he called “drapetomania.” As Wikipedia points out, the term derived from drapetes, Greek for “runaway [slave],” and mania for madness or frenzy. Thus Cartwright defined drapetomania as “the disease causing negroes to run away [from captivity].” “[I]ts diagnostic symptom, the absconding from service, is well known to our planters and overseers,” Cartwright wrote in a much-distributed paper delivered before the Medical Association of Louisiana. Yet this disorder was “unknown to our medical authorities.” Cartwright thought slave owners caused the illness by making “themselves too familiar with [slaves], treating...
  • The Threat of Substandard Drugs

    04/19/2012 3:23:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    National Review Online ^ | April 19, 2012 | Roger Bate
    In the past few months, fake cancer drugs have been found in clinics from California to Illinois. These fakes, which probably originated in China, were traded by numerous Middle Eastern and European traders, all of whom claimed they had no idea the products were fake. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating.But a more subtle and probably greater danger is that some drugs that make it to the U.S. legally simply do not work. All companies make mistakes and occasionally release drugs that don’t work properly. Sometimes negligence is the cause; witness the recent problems at the Puerto...
  • After Mistakes, Scientists Try to Explain Themselves

    04/17/2012 12:28:14 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 16, 2012 | CARL ZIMMER
    Naoki Mori, the Japanese cancer researcher who has had 30 papers retracted by scientific journals, was asked to give his side of the story. In an e-mail, he acknowledged that his colleagues “were lax in certain regards in the preparation of papers,” but he denied having committed a grave offense. The studies were retracted because they used pictures from older papers, rather than from the experiments described in the studies. “I think this reuse is not a scientific misconduct,” Dr. Mori wrote. He and his colleagues studied the response of human cells to infection by bacteria and viruses. To measure...
  • A Sharp Rise in Retractions Prompts Calls for Reform

    04/17/2012 11:58:50 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 16, 2012 | CARL ZIMMER
    In the fall of 2010, Dr. Ferric C. Fang made an unsettling discovery. Dr. Fang, who is editor in chief of the journal Infection and Immunity, found that one of his authors had doctored several papers. It was a new experience for him. “Prior to that time,” he said in an interview, “Infection and Immunity had only retracted nine articles over a 40-year period.” The journal wound up retracting six of the papers from the author, Naoki Mori of the University of the Ryukyus in Japan. And it soon became clear that Infection and Immunity was hardly the only victim...
  • Nanoscale engineering of wound beds

    04/12/2012 8:07:54 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 12 April 2012 | Alisa Becker
    A collagen-binding peptide with applications in wound healing has been developed by scientists in the US. The peptide is able to invade the strands of collagen, forming a strong and stable non-covalent bond at room temperature. Pendant drug molecules could be attached to the peptide and anchored at the wound site to aid wound healing. Representation of a collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) annealing to damaged collagen to anchor a molecule (X) in a wound bed Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body and makes up three quarters of the dry weight of skin. It is formed from three...