Keyword: medicine

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  • Surgery Removed Rare Tumor in Utero [Media Admits Womb-Dwellers Are Persons!]

    06/22/2012 5:56:04 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    NBC MIAMI ^ | 6/21/12 | DIANA GONZALEZ
    Leyna Gonzalez is now a happy, active 20-month-old. However, when she was in her mother's womb a rare tumor was rapidly growing in her mouth. But in the first case of its kind, UM/Jackson fetal surgeons were able to penetrate the amniotic sac with a small scope and successfully remove the tumor in utero. The tumor can easily be seen in a routine ultrasound taken at 17 weeks.
  • Alzheimer's gene 'diabetes link'

    06/21/2012 7:49:52 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 11 replies
    BBC ^ | June 15, 2012 | BBC
    Scientists say they have identified a possible genetic link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. It has been known for some time that people with diabetes have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's, but not why this is so.Now US researchers writing in Genetics say a study of worms has indicated a known Alzheimer's gene also plays a role in the way insulin is processed. ..... < snip > ..... A key indication of Alzheimer's, which can only be seen after death, is the presence of sticky plaques of amyloid protein in decimated portions of patients' brains. Scientists have already...
  • Notebooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic’s Contested Discovery

    06/17/2012 7:36:45 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 11, 2012 | PETER PRINGLE
    NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — For as long as archivists at Rutgers University could remember, a small cardboard box marked with the letter W in black ink had sat unopened in a dusty corner of the special collections of the Alexander Library. Next to it were 60 sturdy archive boxes of papers, a legacy of the university’s most famous scientist: Selman A. Waksman, who won a Nobel Prize in 1952 for the discovery of streptomycin, the first antibiotic to cure tuberculosis. The 60 boxes contained details of how streptomycin was found — and also of the murky story behind it, a...
  • ER doctor's quick action saved life of 8-year-old girl Girl sent to Detroit

    06/10/2012 1:50:46 PM PDT · by Former Proud Canadian · 82 replies
    Windsor Star ^ | June 8, 2012 | Monica Wolfson
    A critically ill eight-year-old child is alive today because a Windsor emergency room doctor refused to wait for provincial approval to send the child to a Detroit hospital, according to the patient’s mother and hospital doctor. “She needed emergency surgery and if you don’t operate she was going to die,” said Dr. David Adekoya, Windsor Regional Hospital’s chief of emergency surgery who was at the hospital when the girl was treated. “She needed to be at a facility within an hour. We needed to make a decision and not wait around.” .... After the transfer to Detroit was arranged, CritiCall...
  • Psychiatric Drug May Kill Cancer Stem Cells

    05/31/2012 11:44:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 24 May 2012 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    Enlarge Image Root killer. Cancer-like stem cells treated with the antipsychotic drug thioridazine (right) are scarce compared with control cells. Credit: E. Sachlos et al., Cell, 149 (8 June), ©2012 Elsevier Inc. A well-known drug for treating schizophrenia may be a cancer killer, too. In lab studies, the drug wiped out a precursor to leukemia cells without harming normal cells. That means it could give doctors a long-sought way to eliminate every trace of leukemia in patients so that the cancer can never come back. Even though surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can get rid of a tumor or leukemia...
  • Chagas: Is tropical disease really the new AIDS?

    05/31/2012 10:53:19 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 15 replies
    Chagas, a tropical disease spread by insects, is causing some fresh concern following an editorial—published earlier this week in a medical journal—that called it "the new AIDS of the Americas." More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States. The editorial, published by the Public Library of Science's Neglected Tropical Diseases, said the spread of the disease is reminiscent of the early years of HIV. "There are a number of striking similarities between people living with Chagas disease and people living with...
  • Tumor Blocker May Fight Fibrosis

    05/30/2012 10:29:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 30 May 2012 | Mitch Leslie
    Enlarge Image Thick-skinned. Fragments of the anticancer drug endostatin can halt fibrosis in a slab of human skin. Credit: Feghali-Bostwick Laboratory Connective tissue holds our bodies together, but in a condition called fibrosis, an overabundance of the material devastates organs such as the liver, heart, and lungs. A new study suggests that fragments of a promising cancer drug can rein in fibrosis, which is currently untreatable. Fibrosis occurs when cells pump out excess collagen and other connective tissue proteins, which harm organs. Pulmonary fibrosis, for example, stiffens the lungs, eventually suffocating patients unless they receive a lung transplant. In...
  • Debt-Hit Greece 'Running Out Of Medication'

    05/29/2012 10:19:11 AM PDT · by tcrlaf · 29 replies
    SKY ^ | 5-25-12 | Jason Ferrell
    Pharmacies in Greece were on strike earlier this week in protest at the government not paying them for medicines that should be free to customers. Many pharmacies now have huge debts to pharmaceutical companies for drugs they have handed out free of charge. Sky News spoke to one pharmacist who has not been paid by the state for over a year. Evaggelina Rousi, who runs a chemist in Athens, said: "The government owes us 30,000 euros but we have not been paid by them for a year and a half. Many people who rely on regular medication are at risk....
  • Stem cell treatment regrows Whitfield man's foot

    05/29/2012 5:45:45 AM PDT · by GrootheWanderer · 21 replies
    The (Dalton, Georgia) Daily Citizen ^ | 05-28-2012 | Charles Oliver
    By the time Dr. Spencer Misner had carved away the dead and diseased flesh from Bobby Rice’s right foot last year, little remained other than bones and tendons. “I couldn’t believe it. It didn’t look real. It looked like something out of a movie,” recalled Rice, a Whitfield County resident. Today, the ankle has almost completely healed. It looks like Rice had simply scraped it. And Rice’s foot has largely healed, too. Misner credits cutting-edge stem cell treatments for saving Rice’s foot and leg.
  • High School Freshman Wins Award For Pancreatic Cancer Test

    05/23/2012 5:01:12 AM PDT · by Puzzleman · 48 replies
    WBAL News ^ | May 22, 2012 | Robert Lang
    He is only a freshman at North County High School in Anne Arundel County. However, 15-year-old Jack Andraka is being recognized for developing what may become an effective way to detect pancreatic cancer.
  • Coffee drinking linked to longer life

    05/17/2012 5:49:05 PM PDT · by Innovative · 65 replies
    CNN ^ | May 17, 2012 | By Amanda Gardner, Health.com
    Drinking a daily cup of coffee -- or even several cups -- isn't likely to harm your health, and it may even lower your risk of dying from chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests. NIH followed 400,000 men and women for 13 years, during which 13% died. In the study, both regular and decaf were associated with a lower risk of dying Overall, coffee drinkers were less likely than their peers to die during the study, and the more coffee they drank, the lower their mortality risk...
  • SIMPLE WOUND CLOSURE 101:

    04/11/2012 6:36:32 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 33 replies
    Modern Survival Online ^ | 4/11/12 | Doc Morgan
    here are essentially two ways to heal a wound: 1) Primary intent: bringing the wound edges together via bandage, suture, or glue. 2) Secondary intent: allowing the wound to heal “as is” when primary intent is not indicated (such as a very contaminated, dirty wound with multiple deep entry points). It’s important to close a wound by primary intent for several reasons: 1) Hemostasis (stopping bleeding): because if you lacerated a vessel with your injury, you will need to ligate it somehow. Granted, if you lacerate a major artery, you will just need to apply pressure because ligating it may...
  • Blogger threatened with jail for writing on health

    05/01/2012 6:46:00 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 34 replies
    WND.com ^ | April 30, 2012 | Jack Minor
    A blogger in North Carolina has been threatened with jail time for “practicing nutrition without a license” by writing about his experiences with diabetes and telling readers what types of food he was eating. It was in January when the North Carolina Board of Dietetics and Nutrition told blogger Steve Cooksey, who writes at diabetes-warrior.net, that it was investigating him for providing nutrition care services without a license. Cooksey was accused of violating Chapter 90, Article 25 of the North Carolina General Statutes, which makes it a misdemeanor to “practice dietetics or nutrition” without state permission – a license. According...
  • Dad rescues ‘brain dead’ son from doctors wishing to harvest his organs...

    04/26/2012 6:52:49 AM PDT · by SumProVita · 102 replies
    LifeSite News ^ | April 25, 2012 | Matthew Cullinan Hoffman
    ...boy recovers completely Although a team of four physicians insisted that his son was “brain-dead” following the wreck, Thorpe’s father enlisted the help of a general practitioner and a neurologist, who demonstrated that his son still had brain wave activity. The doctors agreed to bring him out of the coma, and five weeks later Thorpe left the hospital, having almost completely recovered.
  • Nanomaterials offer hope for cerebral palsy

    04/25/2012 12:50:37 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature News ^ | 18 April 2012 | Amy Maxmen
    Rabbits with brain injuries hop again after treatment with dendrimers. By tacking drugs onto molecules targeting rogue brain cells, researchers have alleviated symptoms in newborn rabbits that are similar to those of cerebral palsy in children. Cerebral palsy refers to a group of incurable disorders characterized by impairments in movement, posture and sensory abilities. In general, medicines tend to act broadly rather than influence certain sets of cells in the brain. “You don’t expect large molecules to enter the brain, and if they do, you don’t expect them to target specific cells, and immediately act therapeutically — but all of...
  • Cheney File Traces Heart Care Milestones

    04/24/2012 3:35:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 23, 2012 | LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN, M.D.
    WASHINGTON — For a man who has long battled advanced heart disease, Dick Cheney has had a remarkable streak of being in the right place at the right time. Now 71, the former vice president has survived five heart attacks, the first of them at the age of 37. Even before he received a heart transplant a month ago today, Mr. Cheney had benefited from just about every procedure, technology and class of drug available to people with his condition — atherosclerosis, in which fatty deposits block blood flow in the arteries. Indeed, Mr. Cheney’s medical history could almost be...
  • Building a 21st Century FDA A better way to fast track new pills for old ills

    04/24/2012 3:13:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Reason ^ | April 24, 2012 | Ronald Bailey
    “FDA is relying on 20th century regulatory science to evaluate 21st century medical products,” declared Food and Drug Administration Commissioner (FDA) Margaret Hamburg back in October 2010. One result: As biotech and medical discoveries accelerate, the number of new drugs approved by the agency remains basically flat. A 2010 study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology by researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas found that the time from drug discovery to marketing increased from eight years in 1960 to 12 to 15 years in 2010. Five years of this increase results from new regulations boosting the...
  • The Wrong Way to Stop Fake Drugs

    04/23/2012 8:22:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 22, 2012 | ROGER BATE
    IN 2007-8, when counterfeit versions of heparin, a blood-thinning drug, were shipped from China to the United States market, 149 people died. In the last few months, bogus versions of the cancer drug Avastin, apparently shipped from the Middle East, have surfaced in clinics in California, Illinois and Texas. Thankfully, so far as we know, they haven’t killed anyone, but more and more cases of dangerous fake drugs are being reported by the Food and Drug Administration. Numerous incidents surely go unreported, the evidence swallowed, the deaths incorrectly attributed to natural causes. Fighting the fake-drug menace is like playing whack-a-mole....
  • The Medicalization of Rebellion - The long, shameful history of using science to stigmatize dissent

    04/23/2012 7:02:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Reason ^ | April 21, 2012 | Sheldon Richman
    In 1861 Samuel A. Cartwright, an American physician, described a mental illness he called “drapetomania.” As Wikipedia points out, the term derived from drapetes, Greek for “runaway [slave],” and mania for madness or frenzy. Thus Cartwright defined drapetomania as “the disease causing negroes to run away [from captivity].” “[I]ts diagnostic symptom, the absconding from service, is well known to our planters and overseers,” Cartwright wrote in a much-distributed paper delivered before the Medical Association of Louisiana. Yet this disorder was “unknown to our medical authorities.” Cartwright thought slave owners caused the illness by making “themselves too familiar with [slaves], treating...
  • The Threat of Substandard Drugs

    04/19/2012 3:23:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    National Review Online ^ | April 19, 2012 | Roger Bate
    In the past few months, fake cancer drugs have been found in clinics from California to Illinois. These fakes, which probably originated in China, were traded by numerous Middle Eastern and European traders, all of whom claimed they had no idea the products were fake. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating.But a more subtle and probably greater danger is that some drugs that make it to the U.S. legally simply do not work. All companies make mistakes and occasionally release drugs that don’t work properly. Sometimes negligence is the cause; witness the recent problems at the Puerto...