Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $21,368
25%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 25% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: medicine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Boy infected with rare brain-eating amoeba in Florida

    08/13/2013 10:26:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    CNN ^ | 11:53 AM EDT, Tue August 13, 2013 | Jen Christensen,
    The new patient is 12-year-old Zachary Reyna, his family told CNN affiliate WBBH. A spokesperson for the Hendry-Glades Health Department in LaBelle, Florida, said that the department wouldn't release the age or name of the infected person for privacy reasons. Reyna's family told WBBH that Reyna was kneeboarding with friends in a water filled ditch by his house on August 3. He slept the entire next day. His family told WBBH that Reyna was an active and healthy seventh grader, so sleeping that much was unusual. His mother took him to the hospital immediately. He underwent brain surgery and doctors...
  • Group doctor visits: What you need to know about shared appointments

    08/13/2013 9:34:19 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 18 replies
    CBS News This Morning ^ | 8-13-13 | Amanda Cochran
    (CBS News) Would you share your doctor's appointment with a stranger? Some people are, opting for a group visit with their physician. It's a way for patients to get more face-time with their doctor -- sometimes as much as an hour or two -- but the time is shared with other people, Dr. Devi Nampiaparampil, an assistant professor at the New York University School of Medicine, explained on "CBS This Morning." A growing number of physicians are offering the option. Since 2005, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the number of physicians offering group visits has doubled. The...
  • China probes drugmaker Sanofi for alleged bribery

    08/10/2013 8:10:25 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 7 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 10, 2013 10:29 AM EDT
    Chinese authorities have launched an investigation against French drugmaker Sanofi following a news report that accused the company of bribing hundreds of Chinese doctors in 2007. An unnamed whistleblower told the Guangzhou-based, state-owned 21st Century Business Herald that the French company had paid 503 doctors a total of $274,000 to prescribe Sanofi products, disguising the payments as grants for research programs. China’s official Xinhua News Agency said Saturday that the Beijing municipal health bureau was teaming up with disciplinary authorities to look into the research programs and determine whether the payments were actually bribes. …
  • Obama Says Insurance Will Be "Significantly Cheaper" Under Obamacare, But That Isn't True

    08/09/2013 4:34:52 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 25 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | August 9, 2013 | John MCCormack
    At a White House press conference Friday afternoon, President Obama said that health insurance plans offered under Obamacare will be "significantly cheaper" than plans currently on the market, but a string of recent reports say that isn't true.
  • Marijuana stops child's severe seizures

    08/08/2013 1:09:22 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    CNN ^ | 8-7-2013 | Saundra Young
    (CNN) -- By most standards Matt and Paige Figi were living the American dream. They met at Colorado State University, where they shared a love of the outdoors. After getting married, the couple bought a house and planned to travel the world. They did travel, but their plans changed when their first child was born in 2004. Max was 2 when they decided to have another child. The couple got the surprise of their lives when an ultrasound revealed not one but two babies. Charlotte and Chase were born October 18, 2006. "They were born at 40 weeks. ... Charlotte...
  • What's In Chocolate, Cocoa That Might Benefit Brain Health?

    08/08/2013 7:17:43 PM PDT · by Innovative · 40 replies
    FORBES ^ | Aug 8, 2013 | Alice G Walton
    In the new study, the team from Harvard randomly assigned 60 elderly people to drink two cups of flavanol-rich or flavanol-poor cocoa every day for a month. There weren't any overall differences between the high- and low-flavanol groups in terms of cognitive abilities, so the researchers looked a little deeper. They found that people who had compromised blood flow to the brain and white matter damage at the beginning of the study did show a difference after drinking the cocoa for a month: Blood flow in their brains improved by about 8%, and the time it took them to complete...
  • Mounting Opposition to IPAB from vulnerable Democrats (AKA Death Panels)

    08/08/2013 2:55:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    National Right To Life News Today ^ | August 8, 2013 | Dave Andrusko
    Last week we ran a story analyzing an op-ed piece that one-time Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean wrote for the Wall Street Journal in which the former Governor of Vermont conceded that the Independent Payment Advisory Board was “essentially a health-care rationing body.” ObamaCare has been controversial from long before it passed by the narrowest of margins and probably no facet has drawn more critics that the IPAB. National Right to Life laid out the rationing problems that are part and parcel of the IPAB from the very beginning (www.nrlc.org/HealthCareRationing/ObamaHCRationingBasicDOCUMENTATION.pdf). Thus it was helpful that Dean admitted there really was...
  • Novel Protein CPTP Offers Hope for Treatment of Cancer and Other Diseases

    08/07/2013 7:35:02 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 13 replies
    Sci-News ^ | August 6, 2013 | Sci-News
    The scientists discovered that the ceramide-1 phosphate transport protein (CPTP) regulates levels of biologically active lipids, which are molecules such as fatty acids that often play a role in cell signaling. They found that CPTP's main function is to transport ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), a lipid that helps regulate cell growth, survival, migration and inflammation. Specifically, C1P increases the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids – powerful signaling molecules that contribute to chronic inflammation in diseases such as cancer, asthma, atherosclerosis and thrombosis – and the discovery of CPTP sheds a light on the cellular mechanisms that contribute to these diseases. "We may have...
  • How 'Junk DNA' Can Control Cell Development (Extra Programming is not junk..)

    08/04/2013 8:34:23 AM PDT · by equalator · 1 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8-2-2013
    Researchers from the Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program at Sydney's Centenary Institute have confirmed that, far from being "junk," the 97 per cent of human DNA that does not encode instructions for making proteins can play a significant role in controlling cell development. And in doing so, the researchers have unravelled a previously unknown mechanism for regulating the activity of genes, increasing our understanding of the way cells develop and opening the way to new possibilities
  • Back from the Dead: Resuscitation Expert Says End Is Reversible

    08/02/2013 12:18:52 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | July 29, 2013
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)Raising the dead may soon become medical reality. According to critical care physician Sam Parnia, modern resuscitation science will soon allow doctors to reanimate people up to 24 hours after their death.At some point, everyone's heart will stop. For most, this is when they begin to die. Doctors succeed in very few cases at bringing the clinically dead back to life. However, more patients could be saved if medical professionals put existing knowledge about the treatment of cardiac arrest to better use, argues critical care physician Sam Parnia, 41, who is leading a revival of research in this field at...
  • Possibility Of First Head Transplant Fraught With Ethical And Medical Dilemmas

    08/01/2013 7:56:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    www.medicalnewstoday.com ^ | 05 July 2013 | Written by Honor Whiteman
    A leading neurosurgeon has revealed a project to carry out the first human head transplantation with spinal linkage within the next two years. The project is code-named HEAVEN/GEMINI. Published in the June issue of Surgical Neurology International, the project has been outlined by Italian neuroscientist and functional neurosurgeon, Dr. Sergio Canavero. He says the procedure would take 100 surgeons 36 hours to complete, and would cost around £8.5 million ($12.6 million). In 1970, US neurosurgeon Robert Joseph White performed an operation to transplant a monkey's head onto another monkey's body. However, the inability to repair the severed spinal cord due...
  • Obamacare Fallout: More Doctors Opting Out of Medicare

    07/29/2013 11:13:38 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 34 replies
    Newsmax ^ | Monday, 29 Jul 2013 10:06 AM | Sandy Fitzgerald
    Three times more doctors are refusing Medicare patients than three years ago, many citing Medicare's increasing rules and lowered payment rates. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which administers the program, even doctors who still see some Medicare patients are limiting the number of Medicare patients they will treat, reports The Wall Street Journal. … The numbers of doctors refusing both Medicare and Medicaid payments won’t completely undermine Obamacare, health experts say, but some patients may have problems finding doctors who will accept their new coverage under the healthcare reform law. …
  • New Method of Killing Cancer Cells Developed

    07/24/2013 9:55:26 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 10 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 2013 July 19 | Sci-News
    Researchers from Canada, France, Germany and the United States reporting in the journal Cell have found a new ground-breaking way of killing cancer cells. Traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause damage to healthy cells, and other more targeted treatments are usually only effective for individual types of cancer. Contrastingly, a new potential treatment does not damage healthy cells and could also be used to treat a wide variety of different cancers. "Cancer cells grow and divide much more rapidly than normal cells, meaning they have a much higher demand for and are often starved of, nutrients and oxygen," explained study co-author...
  • Down's syndrome cells 'fixed' in first step towards chromosome therapy

    07/17/2013 12:14:13 PM PDT · by Renfield · 3 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | 7-17-2013 | Ian Sample
    People with Down's syndrome are at greater risk of heart defects, leukaemia and early-onset dementia. Photograph: Getty Images Scientists have corrected the genetic fault that causes Down's syndrome – albeit in isolated cells – raising the prospect of a radical therapy for the disorder. In an elegant series of experiments, US researchers took cells from people with Down's and silenced the extra chromosome that causes the condition. A treatment based on the work remains a distant hope, but scientists in the field said the feat was the first major step towards a "chromosome therapy" for Down's syndrome....
  • "Big Butt" = Racism? ... Woman Files Complaint After Doctor Diagnoses Her with 'Ghetto Booty'

    07/16/2013 6:11:00 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 26 replies
    KHOU ^ | July 15, 2013 | KHOU
    Woman files complaint after doctor diagnoses her with 'ghetto booty' A Tennessee woman is filing a complaint after she says her doctor used an offensive term when giving her a diagnosis. She her doctor told her that her back pain stems from having a "ghetto booty." Terry Ragland went to her doctor in Jackson looking for treatment for her severe lower back pain. But the visit left her with a different sort of pain. "It's inappropriate. It's sexist," said Ragland. Previously, Ragland had been to the practice before and had two knee surgeries. She said those experiences were good. But...
  • Martin Protests In New York

    07/14/2013 7:45:01 PM PDT · by Pinkbell · 167 replies
    Pinkbell
    Anyone watching the huge Trayvon Martin protests in New York City? According to the guy filming, he's seen at least 8 arrests, there has been pepper spray, and several groups of protestors have joined together. The people out are using Occupy Wall Street chants, so I think they are involved. Link to a video that is not of great quality: http://www.vice.com/read/live-streaming-trayvon-martin-protests-in-new-york Another stream: http://www.ustream.tv/occupyeye One more at Times Square cam: http://www.earthcam.com/usa/newyork/timessquare/
  • Hospital Lobby Driving Medicaid Expansion

    07/12/2013 7:09:31 AM PDT · by MichCapCon · 4 replies
    Michigan Capitol Confidential ^ | 7/9/2013 | Jack McHugh
    People should understand the real reason we're here today. It's not "to help the poor," or because "Obamacare is the law," or because the reforms the House bill would supposedly require are so awesome. We are here because a politically powerful special interest stands to collect billions of dollars if this Legislature approves the Medicaid expansion — and it is willing do almost anything to make that happen. It's explained by the Medicaid expansion "1-2-3": 1. The medical services industry has become far more concentrated due to Obamacare, with a relative handful of big hospital corporations absorbing many formerly independent...
  • It Might Be Harder To Fire People For Being Fat Now

    07/09/2013 2:53:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Business Insider Australia ^ | July 9, 2013 | Erin Fuchs
    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie recently had gastric bypass surgery to help him lose weight.The American Medical Association’s decision to call obesity a “disease” instead of a medical condition could make it harder to discriminate against fat employees, The Wall Street Journal Law Blog reports. Now that obesity is a disease, people with body mass indexes of more than 30 are almost certainly covered under The Americans with Disabilities Act, attorney Jon Hyman told the Law Blog. That 1990 law says employers have to provide disabled workers with “reasonable accommodations” to help them do their jobs. It also makes it...
  • Erie bishop: Saint Vincent no longer a Catholic hospital

    07/09/2013 3:43:37 AM PDT · by markomalley · 16 replies
    Erie Times News ^ | 7/8/2013 | DANA MASSING
    Erie Catholic Bishop Lawrence Persico said that Saint Vincent Health System can no longer be considered a Catholic hospital after its merger with Highmark Inc. However, the bishop did say that Catholics could still use services provided by Saint Vincent. In a statement released Sunday, Persico also thanked the Sisters of St. Joseph of Northwestern Pennsylvania for their 138 years of health-care ministry. The sisters founded the hospital in 1875 and will no longer be its sponsor after the merger, which was expected to take place early this month. "With this change in ownership, there is no longer any guarantee...
  • Wow of the week: Could a 3-D printed cast become a disruptive medical device?

    07/06/2013 6:58:52 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 12 replies
    Medcity News ^ | July 6, 2013 8:45 am | Stephanie Baum
    About 6 million people break their bones each year, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. But after fracturing his arm, one industrial design graduate used a 3-D printer to produce n exoskeletal brace. The result is an innovative concept for fixing broken bones that, if nothing else, has presented an interesting case for rethinking the plaster cast. Victoria University graduate Jake Evill created the brace prototype with a homemade 3-D printer and nylon plastic. In an interview with Wired magazine, Evill said the inspiration for his Cortex design came from the trabecular, a structure that forms the inner...
  • Book Chronicles Face Transplant Recipient's Transformation

    07/03/2013 3:44:37 PM PDT · by mandaladon · 5 replies
    ABC News ^ | 3 Jul 2013 | KATIE MOISSE
    After hiding his face for 15 years, Richard Lee Norris has stepped into the spotlight for a book about the surgery that saved his life. Norris made headlines in 2012 when he received a full face transplant – the result of a 36-hour operation that swapped his scarred skin and shattered bones with tissue from a donor. Now he's sharing his story in "The Two Faces of Richard," a biography punctuated with never-before-seen black and white photos of his amazing transformation. "This book shows that it's possible to go through hell and come out on the other side," said Coos...
  • Tiny Human Liver Built from a Cocktail of Cells

    07/03/2013 1:32:17 PM PDT · by mandaladon · 15 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 3 Jul 2013 | Bahar Gholipour,\
    Stem cells have been used by scientists in Japan to create tiny but working human livers, with complex networks of blood vessels. The human "liver buds" were transplanted into mice, where they grew blood vessels and produced proteins such as albumin that are specific to humans. They also metabolized some drugs that human liver breaks down but a mouse liver cannot. The researchers further confirmed the livers were working by showing that transplanting a liver into a mouse whose liver was lethally damaged allowed the animal to live longer then expected. "It's a human liver, functioning in a mouse," said...
  • Mind Over Matter: Debunking Alternative Medicines

    07/03/2013 12:49:19 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 83 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 1, 2013 | Abigail Zuger
    When Dr. Paul A. Offit published “Autism’s False Prophets” in 2008, he elected to skip the usual round of book signings. His defense of childhood vaccinations so enraged some people who consider them a cause of autism that he was getting credible death threats. Others might have chosen to flee the public arena after that, but not Dr. Offit, the chief of infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, whose appetite for the good fight seems only to have grown. Over the last decade he has become a leading debunker of mass misconceptions surrounding infections and vaccines, and now he...
  • Cancer Scientists Prove Long-Standing Theory on How Cancer Spreads

    06/30/2013 8:57:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies
    SciTech Daily ^ | June 28, 2013 | Staff
    A newly published study shows that white blood cells and a cancer cells can fuse and initiate a tumor, providing the first proof in humans of a long proposed theory.Yale Cancer Center scientists, together with colleagues at the Denver Police Crime Lab and the University of Colorado, have found evidence that a human metastatic tumor can arise when a leukocyte (white blood cell) and a cancer cell fuse to form a genetic hybrid. Their study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, may answer the question of how cancer cells travel from the primary tumor’s site of origin to distant organs...
  • Millions told not to take pills linked to heart attacks and strokes [diclofenac]

    06/29/2013 4:23:43 AM PDT · by expat1000 · 23 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 29 June 2013 | CRAIG MACKENZIE
    Doctors have been told to stop prescribing to patients with a heart condition or circulation problems one of the most commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs in the UK . Britain's drug watchdog said the painkiller diclofenac could significantly increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke for some patients. Millions of people take the drug for a range of conditions including arthritis, headaches, back pain and gout.
  • Type 1 diabetes vaccine hailed as 'significant step'

    06/27/2013 3:28:10 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | June 26, 2013 | BBC
    It may be possible to reverse type 1 diabetes by training a patient's own immune system to stop attacking their body, an early trial suggests. Their immune system destroys the cells that make insulin, the hormone needed to control blood sugar levels. A study in 80 patients, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, showed a vaccine could retrain their immune system. Experts described the results as a "significant step". Normally a vaccine teaches the immune system to attack bacteria or viruses that cause disease, such as the polio virus. Researchers at the Stanford University Medical Centre used a vaccine...
  • Healthcare privacy law guarantees anything BUT privacy

    06/20/2013 8:27:44 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 7 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 6/20/13 | Douglas H. Book
    Few people realize that the HIPAA “privacy” form shoved under the nose of every individual visiting a hospital or doctor’s office has NOTHING whatever to do with the preservation of patient privacy. Nor does it mean that patient consent will be required before a provider may share their records. On the contrary, signing the form simply means the patient has been advised that his most private medical (and other) information may be legally accessed by some 2.2 million entities, many having nothing to do with either health or treatment. In 2009, the federal government modified the HIPAA “privacy rule” so...
  • DOCTORS DUMP HEALTH INSURANCE PLANS, CHARGE PATIENTS LESS

    06/15/2013 5:08:55 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 37 replies
    Breitbart ^ | June 15, 2013
    Thirty-two-year old family physician Doug Nunamaker of Wichita, Kan., said after five years of dealing with the red tape of health insurance companies and the high overhead for the staff he hired just to deal with paperwork, he switched to a system of charging his patients a monthly fee plus the price of an office visit or test, CNN/Money reported. For example, under Nunamaker's membership plan -- also known as "concierge" medicine or "direct primary care" practices -- each patient pays a flat monthly fee to have unlimited access to the doctors and any medical service they can provide in...
  • Loyola med school to admit undocumented students

    06/14/2013 1:17:51 PM PDT · by george76 · 40 replies
    Crain Communications ^ | June 13, 2013 | Claire Bushey
    The university's Stritch School of Medicine not only intends to waive legal residency as an admissions requirement for applicants but aims to offer a financing plan through a state agency
  • Sequester hits cancer patients — doctors, lawmakers seek fix

    06/12/2013 7:57:36 AM PDT · by Zakeet · 11 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | June 10, 2013 | Rachel Rose Hartman
    You may have heard that White House tours were cut due to across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester. Or that Congress made sure to minimize disruptions to air travel. Or perhaps you know someone being furloughed as a result of the cuts. But did you know a major fight is being waged over sequester cuts to some cancer drugs? After Congress failed to pass a budget this spring, a 2 percent cut to Medicare chemotherapy drug reimbursements went into effect April 1 as part of the across-the-board federal spending cuts designed to save $85.4 billion this year. Many...
  • Sebelius won’t waive regulation for girl with five weeks to live: ‘Someone lives and someone dies’

    06/04/2013 12:16:43 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet
    The Washington Examiner ^ | June 4, 2013 | Joel Gehrke
    Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius rebuffed an appeal from Rep. Lou Barletta on behalf of a girl who needs a lung transplant but can’t get one because of a federal regulation that prevents her from qualifying for a transplant. “Please, suspend the rules until we look at this policy,” Barletta, a Pennsylvania Republican, asked Sebelius during a House hearing Tuesday on behalf of Sarah Murnaghan, a 10-year-old girl who needs a lung transplant. She can’t qualify for an adult lung transplant until the age of 12, according to federal regulations, but Sebelius has the authority to waive that...
  • How to Stop the Rise of Superbugs

    06/03/2013 7:35:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 40 replies
    The American ^ | June 3, 2013 | Waldemar Ingdahl
    The rise of 'superbugs' is causing tens of thousands of deaths a year in the United States alone. A problem as complex as antibiotic resistance will require several solutions. Increasing antibiotic resistance is of great concern — the health of millions is dependent on our ability to defeat the threat of infectious diseases. The World Health Organization estimates that multi-drug resistance accounts for more than 150,000 deaths each year from tuberculosis alone.Without effective antibiotics in health care, humanity would be thrown back to the time when urinary tract infections and pneumonia were lethal. Infant and maternal mortality would rise and...
  • What a Disaster… Obamacare Will Cost a Family $20,000 per Year

    06/03/2013 9:41:07 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 75 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | June 3, 2013 | Jim Hoft
    The cheapest Obamacare health insurance plan will cost a family $20,000 per year. Americans will be forced to purchase the plan or face the Obama IRS. CNS News reported: In a final regulation issued Wednesday, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) assumed that under Obamacare the cheapest health insurance plan available in 2016 for a family will cost $20,000 for the year. Under Obamacare, Americans will be required to buy health insurance or pay a penalty to the IRS. The IRS’s assumption that the cheapest plan for a family will cost $20,000 per year is found in examples the IRS gives...
  • AP: Get Ready, Suckers… You’re Going to Lose Your Health Insurance

    05/29/2013 4:33:51 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | May 29, 2013 | Jim Hoft
    After several years of spinning for the Democrats and Barack Obama the liberal media has decided to come clean and tell you what you can expect from Obamacare. And your’re not going to like it. Many Americans are going to lose their plans after all. Of course, Barack Obama repeatedly promised this would not happen. (VIDEO-AT-LINK) And the media let him get away with these lies until now. The AP reported: State insurance regulators say many people who buy their own health insurance could get surprises this fall: cancellation notices because their policies aren’t up to the basic standards of...
  • Obamacare Sticker Shock: Taxing Over 15,000 Medicines

    10/14/2010 6:42:43 AM PDT · by kristinn · 46 replies · 1+ views
    Human Events ^ | Thursday, October 14, 2010 | Connie Hair
    Nancy Pelosi warned us we’d have to pass Obamacare to find out what’s in it. And what we’re finding we don’t like at all. Higher insurance premiums are hitting families hard. Medicare Advantage has been decimated. Millions will be forced into government-run Medicaid where long lines and rationing await. If we like our insurance -- too bad. Beginning January 1, 2011, more than 15,000 over-the-counter (OTC) health care items will require a prescription (and that means a doctor’s visit) for tax-free reimbursement. Under Obamacare, OTC drugs cannot be reimbursed tax-free from Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) or Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs)...
  • The Father Of ADHD Calls Himself A Liar

    05/25/2013 7:35:47 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 31 replies
    freedom outpost ^ | 5-24-13 | Bradlee Dean
    “ADHD is a prime example of a fictitious disease.” These were the words of Leon Eisenberg, the “scientific father of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder),” in his last interview before his death. Leon Eisenberg made a luxurious living off of his “fictitious disease,” thanks to pharmaceutical sales. Coincidentally, he received the “Ruane Prize for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Research. He has been a leader in child psychiatry for more than 40 years through his work in pharmacological trials, research, teaching, and social policy and for his theories of autism and social medicine,” according to Psychiatric News.
  • Dirty medicine (Indian generic pharma fined $500m for fraudulent trials data)

    05/24/2013 4:21:02 AM PDT · by Zhang Fei · 2 replies
    Fortune ^ | May 15, 2013: 9:03 AM ET | Katherine Eban
    On the morning of Aug. 18, 2004, Dinesh Thakur hurried to a hastily arranged meeting with his boss at the gleaming offices of Ranbaxy Laboratories in Gurgaon, India, 20 miles south of New Delhi. (snip) His boss, Dr. Rajinder Kumar, Ranbaxy's head of research and development, had joined the generic-drug company just two months earlier from GlaxoSmithKline, where he had served as global head of psychiatry for clinical research and development. (snip) Like Kumar, Thakur had left a brand-name pharmaceutical company for Ranbaxy. Thakur, then 35, an American-trained engineer and a naturalized U.S. citizen, had worked at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY)...
  • Doctor-owned hospitals

    05/22/2013 2:29:12 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 8 replies
    The Grumpy Economist ^ | May 17, 2013 | John Cochrane
    In writing about the ACA and our health-care problems, I started to think more and more about supply restrictions. In every other industry, costs come down when new suppliers come in and compete. Yet our health-care system is full of restrictions and protections to keep new suppliers out, and competition down. Then we wonder why hospitals won't tell you how much care will cost, and send you bills with $100 band aids on them. In that context, I was interested to learn this week about the ACA's limits on expansion of doctor-owned hospitals. The Wall Street Journal article is here,...
  • “Bare-bones” employer health insurance plans coming thanks to #ObamaCare

    05/22/2013 3:23:15 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    Sister Toldjah Blog ^ | May 20, 2013
    The Wall Street Journal reports on what National Review Online’s Veronique de Rugy calls one more in the law of ”unintended consequences” to the implementation of our President’s “signature law” – ObamaCare (via Memeorandum -bolded emphasis added by me): "Employers are increasingly recognizing they may be able to avoid certain penalties under the federal health law by offering very limited plans that can lack key benefits such as hospital coverage. Benefits advisers and insurance brokers—bucking a commonly held expectation that the law would broadly enrich benefits—are pitching these low-benefit plans around the country. They cover minimal requirements such as preventive...
  • Missing parts? Salamander regeneration secret revealed

    05/20/2013 7:20:34 PM PDT · by Redcitizen · 53 replies
    Live science ^ | 5-20-2013 | Tanya Lewis
    Salamanders can regrow entire limbs and regenerate parts of major organs, an ability that relies on their immune systems, research now shows. A study of the axolotl, an aquatic salamander, reveals that immune cells called macrophages are critical in the early stages of regenerating lost limbs. Wiping out these cells permanently prevented regeneration and led to tissue scarring. The findings hint at possible strategies for tissue repair in humans.
  • Indian American surgeon to discuss 'Obamacare' impact on India

    05/16/2013 6:05:46 PM PDT · by Jyotishi
    The Pioneer ^ | Tuesday, May 14, 2013 | IANS
    Boston - Noted Indian American surgeon Mukesh Hariawala will discuss the business implications of President Barack Obama's second term on the Indian healthcare system at a leadership conclave in Mumbai in June. A Harvard trained cardiac surgeon, who is also a healthcare economist, Hariawala will deliver the keynote address at the 4th annual India leadership Conclave & Indian Affairs Business Leadership Awards 2013 June 21. More than 300 businessmen, diplomats, politicians, social reformers and delegates from Middle East and Europe are expected to attend the conclave with the theme of "New India, Agenda for Change" organised by Network 7 Media...
  • US researchers make embryonic stem cells from skin [Pro-Abortion Crowd Deeply Saddened]

    05/16/2013 3:32:18 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | 5/16/13
    US researchers have reported a breakthrough in stem cell research, describing how they have turned human skin cells into embyronic stem cells for the first time. The method described Wednesday by Oregon State University scientists in the journal Cell, would not likely be able to create human clones, said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. But it is an important step in research because it does not require the use of embryos in creating the type of stem cell capable of transforming into any other type of cell in the body.
  • Simple Tool Stratifies Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

    05/13/2013 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Stoat · 16 replies
    Medscape Medical News ^ | May 13, 2013 | Marlene Busko
    Simple Tool Stratifies Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Marlene Busko May 13, 2013  Researchers have created an online mortality-risk calculator for patients with type 2 diabetes, which stratifies patients into low, medium, or high risk of dying from any cause within 2 years. By plugging in values for 9 readily available patient characteristics — age, body mass index (BMI), diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, antihypertensive treatment, and insulin therapy — a physician can quickly determine whether a patient has a high risk for death. "The novelty and the importance of this study is that we provide...
  • New cancer cures insurers won’t cover

    05/12/2013 1:30:14 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The New York Post ^ | May 8, 2013 | Robert Goldberg
    Advances in cancer treatment are saving lives and cutting health-care costs. But because many health-insurance plans haven’t caught up with the times, nearly half of all cancer patients are forced to choose between the treatment that could save their lives — or one that’s paid for. John Rykert had been battling advanced basal-cell carcinoma for two decades by cutting out the tumors as they appeared. In 2009, after 20 surgeries lasting 10 hours each, Rykert’s doctor said that the cancer had spread so far that the only option left would be to carve out half his face. But then Rykert...
  • 3D Printing to repair degenerative spinal discs

    05/11/2013 8:42:55 AM PDT · by txnativegop · 11 replies
    3D Printer ^ | May 6, 2013 | Cameron Narramore
    Back pain plagues everybody at some point or another. You twist it, you drunkenly sleep on the kitchen floor for too long, your niece was a couple years too old for that piggyback ride — it happens. Or maybe you have Degenerative Disc Disease, . . .
  • Alan Alda wants scientists to cut out the jargon

    05/01/2013 12:44:00 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 58 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 1, 2013 3:21 PM EDT | Frank Eltman
    Among the procedures Army surgeon Hawkeye Pierce performed on “M.A.S.H.” was an end-to-end anastomosis. Most of the viewers, actor Alan Alda concedes, had no idea he was talking about removing a damaged piece of intestine and reconnecting the healthy pieces. Today, the award-winning film and television star is on a mission to teach physicians, physicists and scientists of all types to ditch the jargon and get their points across in clear, simple language. … “There’s no reason for the jargon when you’re trying to communicate the essence of the science to the public, because you’re talking what amounts to gibberish...
  • Newly Discovered Hormone Could Become Wonder Drug Against Diabetes

    04/29/2013 12:24:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Science World Report ^ | April 29, 2013 | Mark Hoffman
    A major research breakthrough was achieved in the field of diabetes by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) who discovered a hormone that could soon enable a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes. A hormone called betatrophin was surprisingly found to cause mice producing insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes. The astonishing results of HSCI co-director Doug Melton...
  • How Government Killed the Medical Profession

    04/23/2013 8:01:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 54 replies
    Reason ^ | Apr. 22, 2013 | Jeffrey A. Singer
    As health care gets more bureaucratic, will doctors go Galt?I am a general surgeon with more than three decades in private clinical practice. And I am fed up. Since the late 1970s, I have witnessed remarkable technological revolutions in medicine, from CT scans to robot-assisted surgery. But I have also watched as medicine slowly evolved into the domain of technicians, bookkeepers, and clerks. Government interventions over the past four decades have yielded a cascade of perverse incentives, bureaucratic diktats, and economic pressures that together are forcing doctors to sacrifice their independent professional medical judgment, and their integrity. The consequence is clear:...
  • My doctor considering going to "concierge" service

    04/16/2013 3:15:05 PM PDT · by rstrahan · 85 replies
    04/16/2013 | Self
    Got a survey on behalf of my physician. Now, I've been a patient for over 25 years. But from the sound of the questioning, he is considering closing his primary care operation and going to a concierge, cash-only physician operation ("Royal Pains" style, if you're familiar with the tv show). So, if he does, he'll have the cream of the local populace, and us who rely on private insurance and Medicare will be looking for another doctor. Just another thank-you to Obama-care.
  • Docs Told They Must Drive Health System Change (focus on "cost value" first, not the patient)

    04/13/2013 9:00:44 AM PDT · by Innovative · 70 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | April 11, 2013 | David Pittman
    Doctors are the only people who can drive the change in healthcare delivery that's needed to save the country from a financial crisis, a health policy expert said here. Emanuel highlighted six elements that must underline payment and delivery reform efforts: -- Focus on cost value -- Focus on the patient -- Standardize processes .... "We need a big infrastructure to be able to deliver high-quality care going forward," Emanuel said.