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Keyword: medicine

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  • Boy infected with rare brain-eating amoeba in Florida

    08/13/2013 10:26:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    CNN ^ | 11:53 AM EDT, Tue August 13, 2013 | Jen Christensen,
    The new patient is 12-year-old Zachary Reyna, his family told CNN affiliate WBBH. A spokesperson for the Hendry-Glades Health Department in LaBelle, Florida, said that the department wouldn't release the age or name of the infected person for privacy reasons. Reyna's family told WBBH that Reyna was kneeboarding with friends in a water filled ditch by his house on August 3. He slept the entire next day. His family told WBBH that Reyna was an active and healthy seventh grader, so sleeping that much was unusual. His mother took him to the hospital immediately. He underwent brain surgery and doctors...
  • Group doctor visits: What you need to know about shared appointments

    08/13/2013 9:34:19 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 18 replies
    CBS News This Morning ^ | 8-13-13 | Amanda Cochran
    (CBS News) Would you share your doctor's appointment with a stranger? Some people are, opting for a group visit with their physician. It's a way for patients to get more face-time with their doctor -- sometimes as much as an hour or two -- but the time is shared with other people, Dr. Devi Nampiaparampil, an assistant professor at the New York University School of Medicine, explained on "CBS This Morning." A growing number of physicians are offering the option. Since 2005, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians, the number of physicians offering group visits has doubled. The...
  • China probes drugmaker Sanofi for alleged bribery

    08/10/2013 8:10:25 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 7 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 10, 2013 10:29 AM EDT
    Chinese authorities have launched an investigation against French drugmaker Sanofi following a news report that accused the company of bribing hundreds of Chinese doctors in 2007. An unnamed whistleblower told the Guangzhou-based, state-owned 21st Century Business Herald that the French company had paid 503 doctors a total of $274,000 to prescribe Sanofi products, disguising the payments as grants for research programs. China’s official Xinhua News Agency said Saturday that the Beijing municipal health bureau was teaming up with disciplinary authorities to look into the research programs and determine whether the payments were actually bribes. …
  • Obama Says Insurance Will Be "Significantly Cheaper" Under Obamacare, But That Isn't True

    08/09/2013 4:34:52 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 25 replies
    The Weekly Standard ^ | August 9, 2013 | John MCCormack
    At a White House press conference Friday afternoon, President Obama said that health insurance plans offered under Obamacare will be "significantly cheaper" than plans currently on the market, but a string of recent reports say that isn't true.
  • Marijuana stops child's severe seizures

    08/08/2013 1:09:22 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    CNN ^ | 8-7-2013 | Saundra Young
    (CNN) -- By most standards Matt and Paige Figi were living the American dream. They met at Colorado State University, where they shared a love of the outdoors. After getting married, the couple bought a house and planned to travel the world. They did travel, but their plans changed when their first child was born in 2004. Max was 2 when they decided to have another child. The couple got the surprise of their lives when an ultrasound revealed not one but two babies. Charlotte and Chase were born October 18, 2006. "They were born at 40 weeks. ... Charlotte...
  • What's In Chocolate, Cocoa That Might Benefit Brain Health?

    08/08/2013 7:17:43 PM PDT · by Innovative · 40 replies
    FORBES ^ | Aug 8, 2013 | Alice G Walton
    In the new study, the team from Harvard randomly assigned 60 elderly people to drink two cups of flavanol-rich or flavanol-poor cocoa every day for a month. There weren't any overall differences between the high- and low-flavanol groups in terms of cognitive abilities, so the researchers looked a little deeper. They found that people who had compromised blood flow to the brain and white matter damage at the beginning of the study did show a difference after drinking the cocoa for a month: Blood flow in their brains improved by about 8%, and the time it took them to complete...
  • Mounting Opposition to IPAB from vulnerable Democrats (AKA Death Panels)

    08/08/2013 2:55:45 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    National Right To Life News Today ^ | August 8, 2013 | Dave Andrusko
    Last week we ran a story analyzing an op-ed piece that one-time Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean wrote for the Wall Street Journal in which the former Governor of Vermont conceded that the Independent Payment Advisory Board was “essentially a health-care rationing body.” ObamaCare has been controversial from long before it passed by the narrowest of margins and probably no facet has drawn more critics that the IPAB. National Right to Life laid out the rationing problems that are part and parcel of the IPAB from the very beginning (www.nrlc.org/HealthCareRationing/ObamaHCRationingBasicDOCUMENTATION.pdf). Thus it was helpful that Dean admitted there really was...
  • Novel Protein CPTP Offers Hope for Treatment of Cancer and Other Diseases

    08/07/2013 7:35:02 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 13 replies
    Sci-News ^ | August 6, 2013 | Sci-News
    The scientists discovered that the ceramide-1 phosphate transport protein (CPTP) regulates levels of biologically active lipids, which are molecules such as fatty acids that often play a role in cell signaling. They found that CPTP's main function is to transport ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), a lipid that helps regulate cell growth, survival, migration and inflammation. Specifically, C1P increases the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids – powerful signaling molecules that contribute to chronic inflammation in diseases such as cancer, asthma, atherosclerosis and thrombosis – and the discovery of CPTP sheds a light on the cellular mechanisms that contribute to these diseases. "We may have...
  • How 'Junk DNA' Can Control Cell Development (Extra Programming is not junk..)

    08/04/2013 8:34:23 AM PDT · by equalator · 1 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8-2-2013
    Researchers from the Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program at Sydney's Centenary Institute have confirmed that, far from being "junk," the 97 per cent of human DNA that does not encode instructions for making proteins can play a significant role in controlling cell development. And in doing so, the researchers have unravelled a previously unknown mechanism for regulating the activity of genes, increasing our understanding of the way cells develop and opening the way to new possibilities
  • Back from the Dead: Resuscitation Expert Says End Is Reversible

    08/02/2013 12:18:52 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | July 29, 2013
    (VIDEO-AT-LINK)Raising the dead may soon become medical reality. According to critical care physician Sam Parnia, modern resuscitation science will soon allow doctors to reanimate people up to 24 hours after their death.At some point, everyone's heart will stop. For most, this is when they begin to die. Doctors succeed in very few cases at bringing the clinically dead back to life. However, more patients could be saved if medical professionals put existing knowledge about the treatment of cardiac arrest to better use, argues critical care physician Sam Parnia, 41, who is leading a revival of research in this field at...
  • Possibility Of First Head Transplant Fraught With Ethical And Medical Dilemmas

    08/01/2013 7:56:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    www.medicalnewstoday.com ^ | 05 July 2013 | Written by Honor Whiteman
    A leading neurosurgeon has revealed a project to carry out the first human head transplantation with spinal linkage within the next two years. The project is code-named HEAVEN/GEMINI. Published in the June issue of Surgical Neurology International, the project has been outlined by Italian neuroscientist and functional neurosurgeon, Dr. Sergio Canavero. He says the procedure would take 100 surgeons 36 hours to complete, and would cost around £8.5 million ($12.6 million). In 1970, US neurosurgeon Robert Joseph White performed an operation to transplant a monkey's head onto another monkey's body. However, the inability to repair the severed spinal cord due...
  • Obamacare Fallout: More Doctors Opting Out of Medicare

    07/29/2013 11:13:38 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 34 replies
    Newsmax ^ | Monday, 29 Jul 2013 10:06 AM | Sandy Fitzgerald
    Three times more doctors are refusing Medicare patients than three years ago, many citing Medicare's increasing rules and lowered payment rates. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which administers the program, even doctors who still see some Medicare patients are limiting the number of Medicare patients they will treat, reports The Wall Street Journal. … The numbers of doctors refusing both Medicare and Medicaid payments won’t completely undermine Obamacare, health experts say, but some patients may have problems finding doctors who will accept their new coverage under the healthcare reform law. …
  • New Method of Killing Cancer Cells Developed

    07/24/2013 9:55:26 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 10 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 2013 July 19 | Sci-News
    Researchers from Canada, France, Germany and the United States reporting in the journal Cell have found a new ground-breaking way of killing cancer cells. Traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause damage to healthy cells, and other more targeted treatments are usually only effective for individual types of cancer. Contrastingly, a new potential treatment does not damage healthy cells and could also be used to treat a wide variety of different cancers. "Cancer cells grow and divide much more rapidly than normal cells, meaning they have a much higher demand for and are often starved of, nutrients and oxygen," explained study co-author...
  • Down's syndrome cells 'fixed' in first step towards chromosome therapy

    07/17/2013 12:14:13 PM PDT · by Renfield · 3 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | 7-17-2013 | Ian Sample
    People with Down's syndrome are at greater risk of heart defects, leukaemia and early-onset dementia. Photograph: Getty Images Scientists have corrected the genetic fault that causes Down's syndrome – albeit in isolated cells – raising the prospect of a radical therapy for the disorder. In an elegant series of experiments, US researchers took cells from people with Down's and silenced the extra chromosome that causes the condition. A treatment based on the work remains a distant hope, but scientists in the field said the feat was the first major step towards a "chromosome therapy" for Down's syndrome....
  • "Big Butt" = Racism? ... Woman Files Complaint After Doctor Diagnoses Her with 'Ghetto Booty'

    07/16/2013 6:11:00 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 26 replies
    KHOU ^ | July 15, 2013 | KHOU
    Woman files complaint after doctor diagnoses her with 'ghetto booty' A Tennessee woman is filing a complaint after she says her doctor used an offensive term when giving her a diagnosis. She her doctor told her that her back pain stems from having a "ghetto booty." Terry Ragland went to her doctor in Jackson looking for treatment for her severe lower back pain. But the visit left her with a different sort of pain. "It's inappropriate. It's sexist," said Ragland. Previously, Ragland had been to the practice before and had two knee surgeries. She said those experiences were good. But...
  • Martin Protests In New York

    07/14/2013 7:45:01 PM PDT · by Pinkbell · 167 replies
    Pinkbell
    Anyone watching the huge Trayvon Martin protests in New York City? According to the guy filming, he's seen at least 8 arrests, there has been pepper spray, and several groups of protestors have joined together. The people out are using Occupy Wall Street chants, so I think they are involved. Link to a video that is not of great quality: http://www.vice.com/read/live-streaming-trayvon-martin-protests-in-new-york Another stream: http://www.ustream.tv/occupyeye One more at Times Square cam: http://www.earthcam.com/usa/newyork/timessquare/
  • Hospital Lobby Driving Medicaid Expansion

    07/12/2013 7:09:31 AM PDT · by MichCapCon · 4 replies
    Michigan Capitol Confidential ^ | 7/9/2013 | Jack McHugh
    People should understand the real reason we're here today. It's not "to help the poor," or because "Obamacare is the law," or because the reforms the House bill would supposedly require are so awesome. We are here because a politically powerful special interest stands to collect billions of dollars if this Legislature approves the Medicaid expansion — and it is willing do almost anything to make that happen. It's explained by the Medicaid expansion "1-2-3": 1. The medical services industry has become far more concentrated due to Obamacare, with a relative handful of big hospital corporations absorbing many formerly independent...
  • It Might Be Harder To Fire People For Being Fat Now

    07/09/2013 2:53:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Business Insider Australia ^ | July 9, 2013 | Erin Fuchs
    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie recently had gastric bypass surgery to help him lose weight.The American Medical Association’s decision to call obesity a “disease” instead of a medical condition could make it harder to discriminate against fat employees, The Wall Street Journal Law Blog reports. Now that obesity is a disease, people with body mass indexes of more than 30 are almost certainly covered under The Americans with Disabilities Act, attorney Jon Hyman told the Law Blog. That 1990 law says employers have to provide disabled workers with “reasonable accommodations” to help them do their jobs. It also makes it...
  • Erie bishop: Saint Vincent no longer a Catholic hospital

    07/09/2013 3:43:37 AM PDT · by markomalley · 16 replies
    Erie Times News ^ | 7/8/2013 | DANA MASSING
    Erie Catholic Bishop Lawrence Persico said that Saint Vincent Health System can no longer be considered a Catholic hospital after its merger with Highmark Inc. However, the bishop did say that Catholics could still use services provided by Saint Vincent. In a statement released Sunday, Persico also thanked the Sisters of St. Joseph of Northwestern Pennsylvania for their 138 years of health-care ministry. The sisters founded the hospital in 1875 and will no longer be its sponsor after the merger, which was expected to take place early this month. "With this change in ownership, there is no longer any guarantee...
  • Wow of the week: Could a 3-D printed cast become a disruptive medical device?

    07/06/2013 6:58:52 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 12 replies
    Medcity News ^ | July 6, 2013 8:45 am | Stephanie Baum
    About 6 million people break their bones each year, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. But after fracturing his arm, one industrial design graduate used a 3-D printer to produce n exoskeletal brace. The result is an innovative concept for fixing broken bones that, if nothing else, has presented an interesting case for rethinking the plaster cast. Victoria University graduate Jake Evill created the brace prototype with a homemade 3-D printer and nylon plastic. In an interview with Wired magazine, Evill said the inspiration for his Cortex design came from the trabecular, a structure that forms the inner...