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Keyword: medicine

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  • Doctor-owned hospitals

    05/22/2013 2:29:12 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 8 replies
    The Grumpy Economist ^ | May 17, 2013 | John Cochrane
    In writing about the ACA and our health-care problems, I started to think more and more about supply restrictions. In every other industry, costs come down when new suppliers come in and compete. Yet our health-care system is full of restrictions and protections to keep new suppliers out, and competition down. Then we wonder why hospitals won't tell you how much care will cost, and send you bills with $100 band aids on them. In that context, I was interested to learn this week about the ACA's limits on expansion of doctor-owned hospitals. The Wall Street Journal article is here,...
  • “Bare-bones” employer health insurance plans coming thanks to #ObamaCare

    05/22/2013 3:23:15 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    Sister Toldjah Blog ^ | May 20, 2013
    The Wall Street Journal reports on what National Review Online’s Veronique de Rugy calls one more in the law of ”unintended consequences” to the implementation of our President’s “signature law” – ObamaCare (via Memeorandum -bolded emphasis added by me): "Employers are increasingly recognizing they may be able to avoid certain penalties under the federal health law by offering very limited plans that can lack key benefits such as hospital coverage. Benefits advisers and insurance brokers—bucking a commonly held expectation that the law would broadly enrich benefits—are pitching these low-benefit plans around the country. They cover minimal requirements such as preventive...
  • Missing parts? Salamander regeneration secret revealed

    05/20/2013 7:20:34 PM PDT · by Redcitizen · 53 replies
    Live science ^ | 5-20-2013 | Tanya Lewis
    Salamanders can regrow entire limbs and regenerate parts of major organs, an ability that relies on their immune systems, research now shows. A study of the axolotl, an aquatic salamander, reveals that immune cells called macrophages are critical in the early stages of regenerating lost limbs. Wiping out these cells permanently prevented regeneration and led to tissue scarring. The findings hint at possible strategies for tissue repair in humans.
  • Indian American surgeon to discuss 'Obamacare' impact on India

    05/16/2013 6:05:46 PM PDT · by Jyotishi
    The Pioneer ^ | Tuesday, May 14, 2013 | IANS
    Boston - Noted Indian American surgeon Mukesh Hariawala will discuss the business implications of President Barack Obama's second term on the Indian healthcare system at a leadership conclave in Mumbai in June. A Harvard trained cardiac surgeon, who is also a healthcare economist, Hariawala will deliver the keynote address at the 4th annual India leadership Conclave & Indian Affairs Business Leadership Awards 2013 June 21. More than 300 businessmen, diplomats, politicians, social reformers and delegates from Middle East and Europe are expected to attend the conclave with the theme of "New India, Agenda for Change" organised by Network 7 Media...
  • US researchers make embryonic stem cells from skin [Pro-Abortion Crowd Deeply Saddened]

    05/16/2013 3:32:18 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | 5/16/13
    US researchers have reported a breakthrough in stem cell research, describing how they have turned human skin cells into embyronic stem cells for the first time. The method described Wednesday by Oregon State University scientists in the journal Cell, would not likely be able to create human clones, said Shoukhrat Mitalipov, senior scientist at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. But it is an important step in research because it does not require the use of embryos in creating the type of stem cell capable of transforming into any other type of cell in the body.
  • Simple Tool Stratifies Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

    05/13/2013 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Stoat · 16 replies
    Medscape Medical News ^ | May 13, 2013 | Marlene Busko
    Simple Tool Stratifies Mortality Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Marlene Busko May 13, 2013  Researchers have created an online mortality-risk calculator for patients with type 2 diabetes, which stratifies patients into low, medium, or high risk of dying from any cause within 2 years. By plugging in values for 9 readily available patient characteristics — age, body mass index (BMI), diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, antihypertensive treatment, and insulin therapy — a physician can quickly determine whether a patient has a high risk for death. "The novelty and the importance of this study is that we provide...
  • New cancer cures insurers won’t cover

    05/12/2013 1:30:14 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The New York Post ^ | May 8, 2013 | Robert Goldberg
    Advances in cancer treatment are saving lives and cutting health-care costs. But because many health-insurance plans haven’t caught up with the times, nearly half of all cancer patients are forced to choose between the treatment that could save their lives — or one that’s paid for. John Rykert had been battling advanced basal-cell carcinoma for two decades by cutting out the tumors as they appeared. In 2009, after 20 surgeries lasting 10 hours each, Rykert’s doctor said that the cancer had spread so far that the only option left would be to carve out half his face. But then Rykert...
  • 3D Printing to repair degenerative spinal discs

    05/11/2013 8:42:55 AM PDT · by txnativegop · 11 replies
    3D Printer ^ | May 6, 2013 | Cameron Narramore
    Back pain plagues everybody at some point or another. You twist it, you drunkenly sleep on the kitchen floor for too long, your niece was a couple years too old for that piggyback ride — it happens. Or maybe you have Degenerative Disc Disease, . . .
  • Alan Alda wants scientists to cut out the jargon

    05/01/2013 12:44:00 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 58 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 1, 2013 3:21 PM EDT | Frank Eltman
    Among the procedures Army surgeon Hawkeye Pierce performed on “M.A.S.H.” was an end-to-end anastomosis. Most of the viewers, actor Alan Alda concedes, had no idea he was talking about removing a damaged piece of intestine and reconnecting the healthy pieces. Today, the award-winning film and television star is on a mission to teach physicians, physicists and scientists of all types to ditch the jargon and get their points across in clear, simple language. … “There’s no reason for the jargon when you’re trying to communicate the essence of the science to the public, because you’re talking what amounts to gibberish...
  • Newly Discovered Hormone Could Become Wonder Drug Against Diabetes

    04/29/2013 12:24:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Science World Report ^ | April 29, 2013 | Mark Hoffman
    A major research breakthrough was achieved in the field of diabetes by scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) who discovered a hormone that could soon enable a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes. A hormone called betatrophin was surprisingly found to cause mice producing insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes. The astonishing results of HSCI co-director Doug Melton...
  • How Government Killed the Medical Profession

    04/23/2013 8:01:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 54 replies
    Reason ^ | Apr. 22, 2013 | Jeffrey A. Singer
    As health care gets more bureaucratic, will doctors go Galt?I am a general surgeon with more than three decades in private clinical practice. And I am fed up. Since the late 1970s, I have witnessed remarkable technological revolutions in medicine, from CT scans to robot-assisted surgery. But I have also watched as medicine slowly evolved into the domain of technicians, bookkeepers, and clerks. Government interventions over the past four decades have yielded a cascade of perverse incentives, bureaucratic diktats, and economic pressures that together are forcing doctors to sacrifice their independent professional medical judgment, and their integrity. The consequence is clear:...
  • My doctor considering going to "concierge" service

    04/16/2013 3:15:05 PM PDT · by rstrahan · 85 replies
    04/16/2013 | Self
    Got a survey on behalf of my physician. Now, I've been a patient for over 25 years. But from the sound of the questioning, he is considering closing his primary care operation and going to a concierge, cash-only physician operation ("Royal Pains" style, if you're familiar with the tv show). So, if he does, he'll have the cream of the local populace, and us who rely on private insurance and Medicare will be looking for another doctor. Just another thank-you to Obama-care.
  • Docs Told They Must Drive Health System Change (focus on "cost value" first, not the patient)

    04/13/2013 9:00:44 AM PDT · by Innovative · 70 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | April 11, 2013 | David Pittman
    Doctors are the only people who can drive the change in healthcare delivery that's needed to save the country from a financial crisis, a health policy expert said here. Emanuel highlighted six elements that must underline payment and delivery reform efforts: -- Focus on cost value -- Focus on the patient -- Standardize processes .... "We need a big infrastructure to be able to deliver high-quality care going forward," Emanuel said.
  • Man wiggles rat's tail using just thoughts

    04/10/2013 11:32:06 AM PDT · by Jyotishi · 25 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Wednesday, April 10, 2013 | PTI
    New York - Scientists have for the first time linked the brains of a human and a rat, enabling the man to use just his thoughts to wiggle the rodent's tail. This is the first case of a brain-to-brain interface between species, and the first example of a noninvasive brain-to-brain interface, researchers claimed. Earlier this year, scientists had linked together the brains of two rats.This first known instance of a brain-to-brain interface apparently helped the rodents share data to accomplish certain tasks, even across intercontinental distances, LiveScience reported. In the latest experiment, researchers from Harvard Medical School employed noninvasive techniques...
  • Magic mushroom drugs could treat severe depression

    04/07/2013 10:47:57 AM PDT · by Jyotishi · 46 replies
    DNA ^ | Sunday, April 7, 2013 | ANI
    Drugs made from magic mushrooms could help treat people with severe depression, a new study suggests. Scientists believe that the chemical psilocybin, the psychedelic ingredient in magic mushrooms, can turn down parts of the brain that are overactive in severely depressive patients, the Guardian reported. The drug appears to stop patients dwelling on themselves and their own perceived inadequacies. However, a bid by British scientists to carry out trials of psilocybin on patients in order to assess its full medical potential has been blocked by red tape relating to Britain’s strict drugs laws. Professor David Nutt, professor of neuropsychopharmacology at...
  • Low Magnesium Linked To Heart Disease [magnesium overlooked as the MAIN FACTOR in heart disease]

    04/06/2013 8:39:15 AM PDT · by Bulwinkle · 66 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | Kelly Fitzgerald
    Low magnesium levels have been found to be the best predictor of heart disease, contrary to the traditional belief that cholesterol or saturated fat play the biggest roles....
  • It’s easier to apply for green card than Obamacare: Application includes 61 pages of instructions

    04/04/2013 2:35:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Market Watch ^ | April 4, 2013 | Jen Wieczner
    If you thought nothing could be more tedious than filling out your tax forms, just wait until you try to apply for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s new exchanges. The draft of the paper application is 15 to 21 pages, depending on whether someone is applying individually or for their family. See the Application for Health Insurance And the instructions for the application run no less than 61 pages. That’s nearly six times longer than the instructions for a green-card application. (There are also videos of the process.) “If you like IRS forms, you’re going to love this...
  • Two ayurvedic drugs hold out hope for Alzheimer’s patients

    04/01/2013 11:21:25 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 43 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Tuesday, April 2, 2013 | Pritha Chatterjee
    New Delhi - It's a disease long associated with the elderly but is now diagnosed in younger people as well and with no permanent cure available till date. However, in what could give hope to thousands suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the pharmacology department in AIIMS has identified Ayurvedic drugs which could have a role in preventing the onset of AD and also restricting its spread in affected patients. AD is a degenerative neurological disorder leading to progressive loss of cognitive abilities, including the patient's memory due to a drop in chemicals — known as neurotransmitters — which transmits messages...
  • ADHD diagnoses in U.S. children rise 53% in the past decade, CDC data show

    04/01/2013 11:51:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 85 replies
    New York Daily News ^ | 04/01/2013 | Tracy Miller
    One in five high school boys and 11% of schoolkids overall have received an ADHD diagnosis, according to new data from the CDC. The data also shows two-thirds of children diagnosed with ADHD are prescribed stimulants like Adderall (above) and Ritalin. About 6.4 million children have received an ADHD diagnosis at some point — an increase of 16% since 2007 and 53% in the past decade. One in five high school boys and 11% of all schoolkids in the U.S. have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to new data released by the Centers for Disease Control and...
  • Health Ministry Finds Brain Drain Cure

    03/26/2013 3:40:01 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 5 replies
    The Pioneer ^ | Wednesday, March 27, 2013 | Archana Jyoti
    New Delhi - Doctors going to the US for studies and then planning to settle down there will not find it easy to do so now. As per new guidelines recently finalised by the Centre, the Union Health Ministry will no longer issue them a ‘No Obligation to Return to India’ (NORI) certificate that allows them to settle in the US. The move aims to check brain drain in the medical profession in the country, said a senior Health Ministry official. He said it is ironic that while the health system in India is crippled due to the acute shortage...
  • Mona Charen: Republicans should prepare for the collapse of Obamacare

    03/22/2013 10:52:08 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | March 21, 2013 | Mona Charen
    In my last column, I argued that for all the undeniable woes of the Republican Party, the unfurling of Obamacare represents a huge vulnerability for Democrats. The Democratic health reform bill is economically nonsensical and politically unpopular. A recent Rasmussen poll found that 54 percent believe the law will damage the U.S. health care system. Even among Democrats, support for the law is ebbing. In February, a Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that only 57 percent of Democrats (compared with 72 percent in November of 2012) support the law. The battle over health care reform is not over. Yes, the...
  • Obamacare Official: “Let’s Just Make Sure It’s Not A Third-World Experience”

    03/22/2013 5:38:41 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 17 replies
    http://washingtonexaminer.com/ ^ | March 22, 2013 | Philip Klein
    With time-running out before the major provisions of President Obama’s health care law are set to be implemented, the official tasked with making sure the law’s key insurance exchanges are up and running is already lowering expectations.
  • Why we need 'death panels' (She was right!)

    03/20/2013 4:37:33 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    MSN Money ^ | March 20, 2013 | Anthony Mirhaydari
    Miyamoto Musashi was a serious man. The warrior-poet walked the medieval Japanese countryside seeking duels with the strongest warriors he could find. He lived a pure ascetic existence. He didn't care where he slept. He carried no money or food. And when too old to fight, after a life on the edge of mortality, he wrote philosophy in a cave. So, pretty much the exact opposite of the modern American lifestyle. Yet as our country grapples with a dangerous debt/deficit problem, caused by demographic challenges and an overpriced and inefficient health care system, we should pay heed to two of...
  • Green tea, coffee may reduce stroke risk by 20 percent

    03/16/2013 9:54:26 PM PDT · by Innovative · 40 replies
    CBS News ^ | March 15, 2013 | Michelle Castillo
    Coffee or green tea drinker? Don't put that cup down: Those beverages may lower your stroke risk if they're a regular part of your daily diet. Researchers discovered that people who drank at least one cup of coffee a day lowered their stroke risk by about 20 percent compared to those who drank it rarely. Compared to those who rarely drank either beverage, those who drank at least one cup of coffee or two cups of green tea a day had a 32 percent lower chance of having an intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke that occurs when a blood...
  • The Doctor Won't See You Now. He's Clocked Out

    03/16/2013 9:12:16 PM PDT · by Innovative · 56 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | March 14, 2013 | SCOTT GOTTLIEB
    ObamaCare is pushing physicians into becoming hospital employees. The results aren't encouraging. The irony is that in the name of lowering costs, ObamaCare will almost certainly make the practice of medicine more expensive. It turns out that when doctors become salaried hospital employees, their overall productivity falls. The result? It is estimated that by next year, about 50% of U.S. doctors will be working for a hospital or hospital-owned health system. Once they work for hospitals, physicians change their behavior in two principal ways. Often they see fewer patients and perform fewer timely procedures.
  • Rare meat allergy linked to ticks found in kids

    03/13/2013 1:01:35 PM PDT · by nuconvert · 15 replies
    Some children living in the U.S. Southeast have a rare meat allergy linked to tick bites, according to a new study. Bites from ticks, usually lone star ticks, cause the body to become allergic to a protein called alpha-gal — which also happens to be found in some mammals, including cows, pigs and sheep, the researchers said. When people who have been bitten develop this allergy, and then eat meat from these animals, they can experience hives, swelling, or more rarely, a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis.
  • Firearm Deaths Lower Where Gun Laws Strong

    03/07/2013 4:43:21 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 27 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | 3-7-13 | John Gever
    The study found that a higher number of firearm laws in a state is associated with a lower rate of firearm fatalities in the state, overall and for suicides and homicides individually. However the study could not determine cause-and-effect relationships because of limitations inherent in the study design. States with more intensive regulation of gun ownership, sales, and storage tended to have lower rates of gun-related fatalities, researchers said. With state-level gun laws from 2007 to 2010 rated on a "legislative strength" scale, states in the top quartile had gun-related fatality rates more than 40% lower than states in the...
  • Doctor gives stroke survivors new shot at mobility, independence

    03/06/2013 2:50:06 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Jewish World Review ^ | March 6, 2013 | Nicole Brochu
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — A single injection, then a five-minute wait. That's all it took for hundreds of stroke and traumatic brain injury patients nationwide to reverse years of debilitation. Now they're walking more steadily, reading more easily, concentrating better, speaking more clearly and regaining use of once-rigid limbs — long after giving up hope that their bodies would ever respond. The 25-milligram shot at renewed independence is the brainchild of Boca Raton, Fla., physician Dr. Edward Tobinick. His patented method for delivering the anti-inflammatory medicine, etanercept, to the brain is getting praise around the world as a "radical breakthrough"...
  • Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us

    02/22/2013 9:44:29 PM PST · by Seizethecarp · 43 replies
    Time (Special Report) ^ | February 20, 2013 | Steven Brill
    When Sean Recchi, a 42-year-old from Lancaster, Ohio, was told last March that he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, his wife Stephanie knew she had to get him to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Stephanie’s father had been treated there 10 years earlier, and she and her family credited the doctors and nurses at MD Anderson with extending his life by at least eight years. Stephanie was then told by a billing clerk that the estimated cost of Sean’s visit — just to be examined for six days so a treatment plan could be devised — would be $48,900, due in...
  • US Army seeks new ways to treat facial skin injuries

    02/16/2013 5:36:07 AM PST · by the scotsman · 1 replies
    BBC News ^ | 16th February 2013 | Jonathan Amos
    'It is extraordinary that doctors were able to do anything for Todd Nelson. The former US Army master sergeant's injuries were so bad the medics thought he would not survive. "I was on my 300th-plus convoy across Kabul, Afghanistan," he recalls. "We were headed home for the night when we passed next to a typical yellow and white sedan. When they saw us getting ready to pass, they flipped the switch. "The blast came in my side of the truck; I was on the passenger side. "It flipped the truck through a brick wall and put shrapnel through my right...
  • Family sugar remedy tested for healing people's wounds

    02/15/2013 10:03:49 AM PST · by Freeport · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | 14 February 2013 | N/A
    A nurse is researching whether an old family remedy using sugar to heal wounds does actually work. Moses Murandu, from Zimbabwe, grew up watching his father use granulated sugar to treat wounds. Sugar is thought to draw water away from wounds and prevent bacteria from multiplying. Early results from a trial on 35 hospital patients in Birmingham are encouraging, but more research is needed. One of the patients who received sugar treatment on a wound was 62-year-old Alan Bayliss from Birmingham. He had undergone an above-the knee amputation on his right leg at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham and, as...
  • Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening

    02/13/2013 11:12:14 AM PST · by Jyotishi · 32 replies
    MedicationSense.com ^ | February 12, 2013 | Jay S. Cohen M.D.
    Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening -- And Why They Will Continue Underlying Causes That Continue to Be Ignored by Mainstream Medicine and the Media From almost the day that they were introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s, sudden, unexpected suicides and homicides have been reported in patients taking serotonin-enhancing antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft. I'm not surprised this problem hasn't disappeared, nor will it unless we look deeper. I never hesitate to say that these drugs -- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- help millions of people....
  • Dr. Carson's Refreshing Jolt of Good Societal Medicine

    02/12/2013 8:34:44 AM PST · by Kaslin · 17 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 12, 2013 | David Limbaugh
    President Obama must have been stunned at the "audacity" of Dr. Benjamin Carson in challenging his core assumptions right to his face in front of thousands of people at the National Prayer Breakfast. Obama is not used to being challenged, especially in public, even if indirectly and without being specifically named. From the look on his face, it was obvious Obama was none too pleased with Carson's message or with his "presumptuousness" in presenting it in that forum, while he had to sit still and -- remain silent. I think we can best understand Carson's message in light of his...
  • 'If they'd treated a dog like dad, the RSPCA would have blown the hospital apart'.....

    02/06/2013 11:17:53 PM PST · by Morgana · 5 replies
    MAILONLINE ^ | Sophie Borland, Daniel Martin and Paul Bentley
    FULL TITLE: 'If they'd treated a dog like dad, the RSPCA would have blown the hospital apart': Families of victims of Stafford hospital scandal tell their stories Families of victims of the Stafford Hospital scandal have revealed harrowing details of how their loved ones died. Here are some of their stories: What I witnessed on the wards I will take to my grave Ellen Linstead, 67, died on December 13, 2006, of C.difficile and MRSA after being admitted with bone cancer. Her daughter Deb Hazeldine said wards were ‘filthy’ and she had to wash faeces off her mother’s hands. She...
  • Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever

    01/27/2013 10:33:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    The New York Times ^ | January 25, 2013 | Andrew Goldman
    As a futurist, you are famous for making predictions of when technological innovations will actually occur. Are you willing to predict the year you will die? My plan is to stick around. We’ll get to a point about 15 years from now where we’re adding more than a year every year to your life expectancy. To clarify, you’re predicting your immortality. The problem is I can’t get on the phone with you in the future and say, “Well, I’ve done it, I have lived forever,” because it’s never forever. You have described microscopic nanobots of the future that will be...
  • American College of Nurse Midwives lends support to “gender variants”

    01/23/2013 1:46:22 PM PST · by Morgana · 23 replies
    Jill Stanek ^ | Jill Stanek
    Anyone else feel like it really is a tide that is turning these days? The American College of Nurse Midwives issued a statement in support of working towards quality, competent care for trans and gender non-conforming people. Woo-hoo! ~ Radical Doula Miriam Zoila Pérez, January 17, excited over a recent statement issued by ACNM that “addresses the need for education about transgender issues in midwifery education.” The statement explains: HIV infection within the gender variant community is 4 times the rate of the general population; rates of drug, alcohol, and tobacco use, and depression and suicide attempts are also higher....
  • Switching To Generic HIV Drugs Could Save The U.S. Billions [BO will throw AIDS patients under bus]

    01/16/2013 3:01:42 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | 1/16/13 | Joseph Nordqvist
    The U.S health care system could save over $1 billion dollars a year if they replace current antiretroviral drugs for HIV infection with generic versions of the medications, a risky move that could seriously affect the efficacy of HIV treatment. The implications of such a change was explored in a study published in the January 15 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine.
  • Cutting Costs, Risking Lives

    01/11/2013 7:24:45 AM PST · by Kaslin · 1 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 11, 2013 | Linda Chavez
    Obamacare promised access to health care to millions of Americans who lacked it, with the president personally promising those who had health care that they liked that they wouldn't be forced to change. Magically, all of this was supposed to be accompanied by lower premiums for those already insured and overall savings in the health care system to slow. But as the program swings into full gear, it is becoming apparent those promises can't be kept -- at least not without major intrusion into health care decisions that affect patients. One of the only ways to save money is to...
  • Doctor Shortage Becoming Crisis Under Obamacare

    01/07/2013 5:55:49 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 42 replies
    Newsmax Health ^ | Monday, January 7, 2013 4:56 PM | Nick Tate
    If it feels like you’re spending more time in the waiting room of your doctor’s office these days, it’s not your imagination. Family doctors are busier than ever. For many people, it is becoming difficult to even find a doctor, say experts who blame Obamacare for accelerating the nation’s doctor shortage. … What’s driving the trend, health experts say, is the nation’s growing population of older Americans using more healthcare resources. At the same time, as many as 1 in 3 practicing physicians are nearing retirement age. What’s more, the addition of some 30 million patients newly covered by insurance—as...
  • 10 surprising quotes from abortionists

    01/06/2013 1:32:20 PM PST · by NYer · 70 replies
    liveactionnews ^ | January 5, 2013 | Lauren Enriquez
    They’re threatened by informed consent. They’re traumatized by the limp body parts they look at every day. They’re torn by the contradiction that they became doctors to preserve life but use their profession to end it. Here are some eye-opening confessions from current and former abortionists. They [the women] are never allowed to look at the ultrasound because we knew that if they so much as heard the heart beat, they wouldn’t want to have an abortion. –Dr. Randall, former abortionistEven now I feel a little peculiar about it, because as a physician I was trained to conserve life, and...
  • Why Was a 2.3% ‘Medical Excise Tax’ Showing Up on Receipts from Sporting Goods Giant Cabela’s?

    01/05/2013 9:17:20 AM PST · by yoe · 54 replies
    The Blaze ^ | January 4, 2013 | Mike Opelka
    January 1, 2013 brought a host of new taxes, fees, and charges to the American people. Some of them were anticipated. Others, like the (Medical Device Excise Tax) (MDET), were not — at least not in this way. How so? Well, the MDET has started showing up on the receipts for purchases made at sporting goods giant Cabela’s. This receipt from one such store in Texas is making the rounds on the web. It shows an additional tax has been added to the purchase, after the local sales tax of nearly 10% was charged. [snip] What is a Medical Excise...
  • Shackled by sanctions, Iran sends India SOS for life-saving drugs

    01/04/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Jyotishi · 14 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Saturday, January 5, 2013 | Shubhajit Roy
    New Delhi - Its healthcare system crippled by international economic sanctions, Iran has asked India for help to procure life-saving drugs for patients battling critical illnesses in that country. Tehran has put in an urgent request to New Delhi for drugs to treat lung and breast cancers; brain tumours; heart ailments; infections after kidney, heart and pancreas transplants; meningitis in HIV patients; arthritis; bronchitis and respiratory distress in newborns; and epilepsy, South Block sources told The Indian Express. On December 27, the sources said, the government forwarded the request for 28 essential medicines to Indian pharmaceutical companies. The required quantities...
  • The Socialist Mind Game: A Brief Manual

    01/01/2013 3:46:29 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | January 1, 2013 | Oleg Atbashian
    We are being played; it's time we learned the game. Conservatives have their Constitution. Progressives have their Narrative. The current battle for America is between these two concepts, and each side uses different rules to fight it. One set of rules is consistent with an unchanging objective: limited government and individual freedoms. The other side's rules are as fickle as their goals, which are never fully disclosed beyond the equivocal references to fairness and hyphenated forms of justice. They will have to remain vague and deny their true allegiances until a time when American voters will no longer squirm at...
  • Panda Blood Compound 6x More Powerful Than Current Antibiotics

    01/01/2013 1:54:41 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 31 replies
    DVICE ^ | Jan 1, 2013 | Evan Ackerman
    Panda blood compound 6x more powerful than current antibiotics In what could be either very good news or very bad news for our fluffy black and white friends, it's been discovered that panda blood contains an antibiotic compound that's vastly more powerful than anything we've got right now. Researchers at the Life Sciences College of Nanjing Agricultural University in China have extracted a compound called cathelicidin-AM from the blood of giant pandas. Cathelicidin-AM is what's called a gene-encoded antimicrobial peptide, a natural antibiotic that's produced by a panda's immune cells. Testing has shown that cathelicidin-AM can kill even drug resistant...
  • Nobel scientist Rita Levi-Montalcini dies in Rome

    01/01/2013 10:16:41 AM PST · by TurboZamboni · 4 replies
    pioneer press ^ | 12-31-12 | Frances D'emilio
    Rita Levi-Montalcini, a biologist who conducted underground research in defiance of Fascist persecution and went on to win a Nobel Prize for helping unlock the mysteries of the cell, died at her home in Rome on Sunday, Dec. 30. She was 103 and had worked well into her final years. Rome Mayor Gianni Alemanno, announcing her death in a statement, called it a great loss "for all of humanity." He praised her as someone who represented "civic conscience, culture and the spirit of research of our time." Italy's so-called "Lady of the Cells," a Jew who lived through anti-Semitic discrimination...
  • China researchers link obesity to bacteria

    12/20/2012 4:07:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    The New York Daily News ^ | December 20, 2012
    Chinese researchers have identified a bacteria which may cause obesity, according to a new paper suggesting diets that alter the presence of microbes in humans could combat the condition. Researchers in Shanghai found that mice bred to be resistant to obesity even when fed high-fat foods became excessively overweight when injected with a kind of human bacteria and subjected to a rich diet. The bacterium -- known as enterobacter -- had been linked with obesity after being found in high quantities in the gut of a morbidly obese human volunteer, said the report, written by researchers at Shanghai's Jiaotong University....
  • Woman Dies After Receiving Smoker's Lungs in Transplant

    12/19/2012 9:23:13 AM PST · by Baynative · 37 replies
    GMA news ^ | 12/19/12 | LIZ NEPORENT |
    Jennifer Wederell, a 27-year-old British woman with cystic fibrosis, died of lung cancer after she received the lungs of a heavy smoker in an organ transplant.
  • Grapefruit Is a Culprit in More Drug Reactions

    12/18/2012 8:13:07 PM PST · by neverdem · 61 replies
    NY Times ^ | DECEMBER 17, 2012 | RONI CARYN RABIN
    The patient didn’t overdose on medication. She overdosed on grapefruit juice. The 42-year-old was barely responding when her husband brought her to the emergency room. Her heart rate was slowing, and her blood pressure was falling. Doctors had to insert a breathing tube, and then a pacemaker, to revive her. They were mystified: The patient’s husband said she suffered from migraines and was taking a blood pressure drug called verapamil to help prevent the headaches. But blood tests showed she had an alarming amount of the drug in her system, five times the safe level. Did she overdose? Was she...
  • Authorities Scramble to Kill off Fictional Swede

    12/11/2012 8:11:43 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    The Local ^ | 11 Dec 12
    The Swedish Tax Authority (Skatteverket) scrambled this week to block a personal identification number, linked to Wednesday's date, which could have given a newborn boy a lengthy and somewhat confusing health record. Tolvan Tolvansson (tolv means "twelve" in Swedish) is constantly ill and pops up at hospitals and clinics across the country. At one point, he was both pregnant and suffering prostate cancer, medical journal Dagens Medecin reports. Tolvansson has also been pronounced dead on numerous occasions. Yet he is a completely fictional character, made up for health care staff to learn their way around different databases. He never really...
  • New Bacteria Raises Concern

    12/03/2012 1:31:48 AM PST · by neverdem · 167 replies
    KDLT ^ | November 29, 2012 | Laura Monteverdi
    A deadly bacteria known as Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, is raising concerns in the medical community. Jennifer Hsu in an Infectious Disease Physician at Sanford Health and has been closely studying this 'super bug' which is best known for it's ability to defy even the strongest of drugs. “What has happened over time with increasing exposure to antibiotics the bacteria have developed ways to evade those antibiotics and they become resist to a certain class of antibiotics,” said Hsu. In the United States, the bacteria have been found primarily in healthcare facilities and hospitals and are known to prey on...