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Keyword: medicine

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  • Firearm Deaths Lower Where Gun Laws Strong

    03/07/2013 4:43:21 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 27 replies
    Medpage Today ^ | 3-7-13 | John Gever
    The study found that a higher number of firearm laws in a state is associated with a lower rate of firearm fatalities in the state, overall and for suicides and homicides individually. However the study could not determine cause-and-effect relationships because of limitations inherent in the study design. States with more intensive regulation of gun ownership, sales, and storage tended to have lower rates of gun-related fatalities, researchers said. With state-level gun laws from 2007 to 2010 rated on a "legislative strength" scale, states in the top quartile had gun-related fatality rates more than 40% lower than states in the...
  • Doctor gives stroke survivors new shot at mobility, independence

    03/06/2013 2:50:06 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Jewish World Review ^ | March 6, 2013 | Nicole Brochu
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — A single injection, then a five-minute wait. That's all it took for hundreds of stroke and traumatic brain injury patients nationwide to reverse years of debilitation. Now they're walking more steadily, reading more easily, concentrating better, speaking more clearly and regaining use of once-rigid limbs — long after giving up hope that their bodies would ever respond. The 25-milligram shot at renewed independence is the brainchild of Boca Raton, Fla., physician Dr. Edward Tobinick. His patented method for delivering the anti-inflammatory medicine, etanercept, to the brain is getting praise around the world as a "radical breakthrough"...
  • Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us

    02/22/2013 9:44:29 PM PST · by Seizethecarp · 43 replies
    Time (Special Report) ^ | February 20, 2013 | Steven Brill
    When Sean Recchi, a 42-year-old from Lancaster, Ohio, was told last March that he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, his wife Stephanie knew she had to get him to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Stephanie’s father had been treated there 10 years earlier, and she and her family credited the doctors and nurses at MD Anderson with extending his life by at least eight years. Stephanie was then told by a billing clerk that the estimated cost of Sean’s visit — just to be examined for six days so a treatment plan could be devised — would be $48,900, due in...
  • US Army seeks new ways to treat facial skin injuries

    02/16/2013 5:36:07 AM PST · by the scotsman · 1 replies
    BBC News ^ | 16th February 2013 | Jonathan Amos
    'It is extraordinary that doctors were able to do anything for Todd Nelson. The former US Army master sergeant's injuries were so bad the medics thought he would not survive. "I was on my 300th-plus convoy across Kabul, Afghanistan," he recalls. "We were headed home for the night when we passed next to a typical yellow and white sedan. When they saw us getting ready to pass, they flipped the switch. "The blast came in my side of the truck; I was on the passenger side. "It flipped the truck through a brick wall and put shrapnel through my right...
  • Family sugar remedy tested for healing people's wounds

    02/15/2013 10:03:49 AM PST · by Freeport · 37 replies
    BBC News ^ | 14 February 2013 | N/A
    A nurse is researching whether an old family remedy using sugar to heal wounds does actually work. Moses Murandu, from Zimbabwe, grew up watching his father use granulated sugar to treat wounds. Sugar is thought to draw water away from wounds and prevent bacteria from multiplying. Early results from a trial on 35 hospital patients in Birmingham are encouraging, but more research is needed. One of the patients who received sugar treatment on a wound was 62-year-old Alan Bayliss from Birmingham. He had undergone an above-the knee amputation on his right leg at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham and, as...
  • Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening

    02/13/2013 11:12:14 AM PST · by Jyotishi · 32 replies
    MedicationSense.com ^ | February 12, 2013 | Jay S. Cohen M.D.
    Suicides and Homicides in Patients Taking Paxil, Prozac, and Zoloft: Why They Keep Happening -- And Why They Will Continue Underlying Causes That Continue to Be Ignored by Mainstream Medicine and the Media From almost the day that they were introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s, sudden, unexpected suicides and homicides have been reported in patients taking serotonin-enhancing antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft. I'm not surprised this problem hasn't disappeared, nor will it unless we look deeper. I never hesitate to say that these drugs -- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- help millions of people....
  • Dr. Carson's Refreshing Jolt of Good Societal Medicine

    02/12/2013 8:34:44 AM PST · by Kaslin · 17 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 12, 2013 | David Limbaugh
    President Obama must have been stunned at the "audacity" of Dr. Benjamin Carson in challenging his core assumptions right to his face in front of thousands of people at the National Prayer Breakfast. Obama is not used to being challenged, especially in public, even if indirectly and without being specifically named. From the look on his face, it was obvious Obama was none too pleased with Carson's message or with his "presumptuousness" in presenting it in that forum, while he had to sit still and -- remain silent. I think we can best understand Carson's message in light of his...
  • 'If they'd treated a dog like dad, the RSPCA would have blown the hospital apart'.....

    02/06/2013 11:17:53 PM PST · by Morgana · 5 replies
    MAILONLINE ^ | Sophie Borland, Daniel Martin and Paul Bentley
    FULL TITLE: 'If they'd treated a dog like dad, the RSPCA would have blown the hospital apart': Families of victims of Stafford hospital scandal tell their stories Families of victims of the Stafford Hospital scandal have revealed harrowing details of how their loved ones died. Here are some of their stories: What I witnessed on the wards I will take to my grave Ellen Linstead, 67, died on December 13, 2006, of C.difficile and MRSA after being admitted with bone cancer. Her daughter Deb Hazeldine said wards were ‘filthy’ and she had to wash faeces off her mother’s hands. She...
  • Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever

    01/27/2013 10:33:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    The New York Times ^ | January 25, 2013 | Andrew Goldman
    As a futurist, you are famous for making predictions of when technological innovations will actually occur. Are you willing to predict the year you will die? My plan is to stick around. We’ll get to a point about 15 years from now where we’re adding more than a year every year to your life expectancy. To clarify, you’re predicting your immortality. The problem is I can’t get on the phone with you in the future and say, “Well, I’ve done it, I have lived forever,” because it’s never forever. You have described microscopic nanobots of the future that will be...
  • American College of Nurse Midwives lends support to “gender variants”

    01/23/2013 1:46:22 PM PST · by Morgana · 23 replies
    Jill Stanek ^ | Jill Stanek
    Anyone else feel like it really is a tide that is turning these days? The American College of Nurse Midwives issued a statement in support of working towards quality, competent care for trans and gender non-conforming people. Woo-hoo! ~ Radical Doula Miriam Zoila Pérez, January 17, excited over a recent statement issued by ACNM that “addresses the need for education about transgender issues in midwifery education.” The statement explains: HIV infection within the gender variant community is 4 times the rate of the general population; rates of drug, alcohol, and tobacco use, and depression and suicide attempts are also higher....
  • Switching To Generic HIV Drugs Could Save The U.S. Billions [BO will throw AIDS patients under bus]

    01/16/2013 3:01:42 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | 1/16/13 | Joseph Nordqvist
    The U.S health care system could save over $1 billion dollars a year if they replace current antiretroviral drugs for HIV infection with generic versions of the medications, a risky move that could seriously affect the efficacy of HIV treatment. The implications of such a change was explored in a study published in the January 15 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine.
  • Cutting Costs, Risking Lives

    01/11/2013 7:24:45 AM PST · by Kaslin · 1 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 11, 2013 | Linda Chavez
    Obamacare promised access to health care to millions of Americans who lacked it, with the president personally promising those who had health care that they liked that they wouldn't be forced to change. Magically, all of this was supposed to be accompanied by lower premiums for those already insured and overall savings in the health care system to slow. But as the program swings into full gear, it is becoming apparent those promises can't be kept -- at least not without major intrusion into health care decisions that affect patients. One of the only ways to save money is to...
  • Doctor Shortage Becoming Crisis Under Obamacare

    01/07/2013 5:55:49 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 42 replies
    Newsmax Health ^ | Monday, January 7, 2013 4:56 PM | Nick Tate
    If it feels like you’re spending more time in the waiting room of your doctor’s office these days, it’s not your imagination. Family doctors are busier than ever. For many people, it is becoming difficult to even find a doctor, say experts who blame Obamacare for accelerating the nation’s doctor shortage. … What’s driving the trend, health experts say, is the nation’s growing population of older Americans using more healthcare resources. At the same time, as many as 1 in 3 practicing physicians are nearing retirement age. What’s more, the addition of some 30 million patients newly covered by insurance—as...
  • 10 surprising quotes from abortionists

    01/06/2013 1:32:20 PM PST · by NYer · 70 replies
    liveactionnews ^ | January 5, 2013 | Lauren Enriquez
    They’re threatened by informed consent. They’re traumatized by the limp body parts they look at every day. They’re torn by the contradiction that they became doctors to preserve life but use their profession to end it. Here are some eye-opening confessions from current and former abortionists. They [the women] are never allowed to look at the ultrasound because we knew that if they so much as heard the heart beat, they wouldn’t want to have an abortion. –Dr. Randall, former abortionistEven now I feel a little peculiar about it, because as a physician I was trained to conserve life, and...
  • Why Was a 2.3% ‘Medical Excise Tax’ Showing Up on Receipts from Sporting Goods Giant Cabela’s?

    01/05/2013 9:17:20 AM PST · by yoe · 54 replies
    The Blaze ^ | January 4, 2013 | Mike Opelka
    January 1, 2013 brought a host of new taxes, fees, and charges to the American people. Some of them were anticipated. Others, like the (Medical Device Excise Tax) (MDET), were not — at least not in this way. How so? Well, the MDET has started showing up on the receipts for purchases made at sporting goods giant Cabela’s. This receipt from one such store in Texas is making the rounds on the web. It shows an additional tax has been added to the purchase, after the local sales tax of nearly 10% was charged. [snip] What is a Medical Excise...
  • Shackled by sanctions, Iran sends India SOS for life-saving drugs

    01/04/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Jyotishi · 14 replies
    The Indian Express ^ | Saturday, January 5, 2013 | Shubhajit Roy
    New Delhi - Its healthcare system crippled by international economic sanctions, Iran has asked India for help to procure life-saving drugs for patients battling critical illnesses in that country. Tehran has put in an urgent request to New Delhi for drugs to treat lung and breast cancers; brain tumours; heart ailments; infections after kidney, heart and pancreas transplants; meningitis in HIV patients; arthritis; bronchitis and respiratory distress in newborns; and epilepsy, South Block sources told The Indian Express. On December 27, the sources said, the government forwarded the request for 28 essential medicines to Indian pharmaceutical companies. The required quantities...
  • The Socialist Mind Game: A Brief Manual

    01/01/2013 3:46:29 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | January 1, 2013 | Oleg Atbashian
    We are being played; it's time we learned the game. Conservatives have their Constitution. Progressives have their Narrative. The current battle for America is between these two concepts, and each side uses different rules to fight it. One set of rules is consistent with an unchanging objective: limited government and individual freedoms. The other side's rules are as fickle as their goals, which are never fully disclosed beyond the equivocal references to fairness and hyphenated forms of justice. They will have to remain vague and deny their true allegiances until a time when American voters will no longer squirm at...
  • Panda Blood Compound 6x More Powerful Than Current Antibiotics

    01/01/2013 1:54:41 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 31 replies
    DVICE ^ | Jan 1, 2013 | Evan Ackerman
    Panda blood compound 6x more powerful than current antibiotics In what could be either very good news or very bad news for our fluffy black and white friends, it's been discovered that panda blood contains an antibiotic compound that's vastly more powerful than anything we've got right now. Researchers at the Life Sciences College of Nanjing Agricultural University in China have extracted a compound called cathelicidin-AM from the blood of giant pandas. Cathelicidin-AM is what's called a gene-encoded antimicrobial peptide, a natural antibiotic that's produced by a panda's immune cells. Testing has shown that cathelicidin-AM can kill even drug resistant...
  • Nobel scientist Rita Levi-Montalcini dies in Rome

    01/01/2013 10:16:41 AM PST · by TurboZamboni · 4 replies
    pioneer press ^ | 12-31-12 | Frances D'emilio
    Rita Levi-Montalcini, a biologist who conducted underground research in defiance of Fascist persecution and went on to win a Nobel Prize for helping unlock the mysteries of the cell, died at her home in Rome on Sunday, Dec. 30. She was 103 and had worked well into her final years. Rome Mayor Gianni Alemanno, announcing her death in a statement, called it a great loss "for all of humanity." He praised her as someone who represented "civic conscience, culture and the spirit of research of our time." Italy's so-called "Lady of the Cells," a Jew who lived through anti-Semitic discrimination...
  • China researchers link obesity to bacteria

    12/20/2012 4:07:35 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    The New York Daily News ^ | December 20, 2012
    Chinese researchers have identified a bacteria which may cause obesity, according to a new paper suggesting diets that alter the presence of microbes in humans could combat the condition. Researchers in Shanghai found that mice bred to be resistant to obesity even when fed high-fat foods became excessively overweight when injected with a kind of human bacteria and subjected to a rich diet. The bacterium -- known as enterobacter -- had been linked with obesity after being found in high quantities in the gut of a morbidly obese human volunteer, said the report, written by researchers at Shanghai's Jiaotong University....