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Keyword: medicine

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  • Medicine Is In Your Mouth

    10/12/2012 12:03:36 AM PDT · by Frank Broom · 7 replies
    10-12-12 | Frank Broom
    One of the most important things people overlook in dealing with sickness is what they speak out of their mouth. You can't just speak anything because your words have an effect on your body. In the book of James he says, if you offend not in word, you are able to bridle your whole body. He also goes on to say your tongue is like the rudder of a ship, so if you want to go from sickness to healing then you are going to have to set your tongue to healing and not sickness. In 1Peter 3:10 he says,...
  • Black mamba bite packs potent painkiller

    10/11/2012 9:58:39 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | October 4, 2012 | Tanya Lewis
    Study of snake venom in mice reveals potential new strategy for relieving agony A snakebite may bring on a world of hurt, but a substance found in black mamba venom could actually relieve pain. The finding reveals a new possible approach for pain treatment, researchers report online October 3 in Nature. The black mamba, Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis, is one of the most lethal snakes on Earth. But a team of researchers in France found that compounds in the snake’s venom have the same pain-banishing effect on mice that morphine does. The compounds, called mambalgins, appear to work by blocking certain...
  • Scientists Win Nobel Prize for Stem-Cell Work [ELIMINATES NEED FOR EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS!]

    10/08/2012 6:01:57 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 30 replies
    WSJ ^ | 10/8/12 | GAUTAM NAIK
    John B. Gurdon of the U.K. and Shinya Yamanaka of Japan shared this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work in so-called cellular reprogramming, which has unleashed a wave of advances in everything from cloning to the possible treatment of diseases using stem cells.... It also allows scientists to create human embryonic stem cells without having to destroy human embryos, sidestepping an approach that has long been fraught with ethical controversies. Most important, perhaps, it has significantly advanced the prospect of using a patient's own mature cells to create fresh tissue and treat disease.
  • Drug 'may prevent stroke damage'

    10/08/2012 9:08:55 AM PDT · by Silentgypsy · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | 10/07/2012 | Unattributed
    It may be possible to use a drug to prevent some of the lasting and crippling damage caused by a stroke, according to doctors in the US and Canada. A safety trial, published in the Lancet Neurology medical journal, suggested the chemical NA-1 was safe to use. The study on 185 people also hinted that patients given the drug developed fewer regions of damaged brain tissue. The Stroke Association said that it was promising, but needed more research. Tests in primates had suggested NA-1 prevented brain cells dying when a stroke starved them of oxygen.
  • Vitamin B3 May Help Kill Superbugs

    10/07/2012 11:17:41 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 43 replies
    Medical News Today (MNT) ^ | August 25, 2012 | Catharine Paddock, PhD
    Nicotinamide, commonly known as vitamin B3, may help the innate immune system kill antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". In lab work done with mice and human blood, researchers found high doses of the vitamin increased the ability of immune cells to kill the bacteria by 1,000 times.The discovery opens the door to a new arsenal of tools for dealing with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, such as those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA, that have killed thousands of people around the world. They are increasing in hospitals and nursing homes, and also rising in prisons, among athletes, people in...
  • Ketamine for Depression: The Most Important Advance in Field in 50 Years?

    10/06/2012 4:37:30 PM PDT · by Renfield · 67 replies
    Time Healthland ^ | 10-05-2012 | Maia Szalavitz
    In any given year, 7% of adults suffer from major depression, and at least 1 in 10 youth will reckon with the disorder at some point during their teenage years. But about 20% of these cases will not respond to current treatments; for those that do, relief may take weeks to months to come. There is one treatment, however, that works much faster: the anesthetic and “club drug” ketamine. It takes effect within hours. A single dose of ketamine produces relief of depression that has been shown in studies to last for up to 10 days; it also appears to...
  • Common heart treatment fails to help - Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke

    10/05/2012 10:59:15 AM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | October 2nd, 2012 | Nathan Seppa
    Beta blockers may offer little against heart attack, stroke Commonly prescribed drugs called beta blockers fail to protect against heart attacks and strokes even while helping to control heart rate and blood pressure, researchers report in the Oct. 3 Journal of the American Medical Association. Beta blockers also didn’t lessen the odds of a heart-related death, in heart attack patients or others at risk, over a median follow-up of 44 months. The American Heart Association had previously discouraged the long-term use of beta blockers as a post–heart attack treatment beyond three years. The new findings further dim the prospects for...
  • Rapid test pinpoints newborns' genetic diseases in days

    10/04/2012 8:09:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 03 October 2012 | Monya Baker
    Method raises hopes for routine whole-genome sequencing in neonatal intensive care. A faster DNA sequencing machine and streamlined analysis of the results can diagnose genetic disorders in days rather than weeks, as reported today in Science Translational Medicine1. Up to a third of the babies admitted to neonatal intensive care units have a genetic disease. Although symptoms may be severe, the genetic cause can be hard to pin down. Thousands of genetic diseases have been described, but relatively few tests are available, and even these may detect only the most common mutations. Whole-genome sequencing could test for many diseases at...
  • 4 Dead from Rare Meningitis, More Cases Expected

    10/04/2012 7:31:35 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 10 replies
    Fox/AP ^ | October 04, 2012
    -excerpt- All received steroid injections, mostly for back pain, a fairly typical treatment.
  • Surprises in breast cancer genetics study

    09/23/2012 5:15:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | September 23, 2012 | Victoria Colliver
    In a move that could alter the way that breast cancers are treated, researchers have redefined the disease into four main classes and determined that one type of breast cancer has more in common with an aggressive form of ovarian cancer than other breast cancers. The finding that a form of breast cancer may be genetically similar to a type of ovarian cancer underscores a new way thinking about cancer that moves away from defining cancers by the organ of origin. The findings are the result of the largest and most comprehensive study of the genetics of breast cancer to...
  • 2C-I or 'Smiles': The New Killer Drug Every Parent Should Know About

    09/21/2012 7:16:55 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 37 replies
    Witnesses described the 17-year-old boy as "shaking, growling, foaming at the mouth." According to police reports, Elijah Stai was at a McDonald's with his friend when he began to feel ill. Soon after, he "started to smash his head against the ground" and began acting "possessed," according to a witness. Two hours later, he had stopped breathing
  • Obamacare and Laptop Medicine

    09/18/2012 7:19:47 AM PDT · by arthurus · 7 replies
    Right Side News ^ | 18 September 2012 | Charles G. Battig, M.D.
    The era of laptop medicine is now upon us. Make that, laptop-computer medicine. Visit your physician and odds are that he will enter the examining room with his shiny new laptop in hand. The push for electronic records in the name of medical record portability and efficient record keeping is documented in the press, and the potential advantages appear convincing.
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease...

    09/17/2012 10:37:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Sep. 11, 2012 | NA
    Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Not Associated With Lower Risk of Major Cardiovascular Disease Events In a study that included nearly 70,000 patients, supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was not associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, cardiac death, sudden death, heart attack, or stroke, according to an analysis of previous studies published in the Sept. 12 issue of JAMA. "Treatment with marine-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for the prevention of major cardiovascular adverse outcomes has been supported by a number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and refuted by others. Although their mechanism of action is not clear,...
  • Layoffs: Medical device companies cut 2,000 jobs in 2 months

    09/17/2012 8:55:45 AM PDT · by Sopater · 21 replies
    Mass Device ^ | September 14, 2012 | MassDevice staff
    Cost-cutting moves by medical device companies have resulted in the loss of more than 2,000 jobs over the past 2 months. Medical device companies are molting at a reptilian rate, shedding more than 2,000 jobs over the past 2 months as they look to slash costs across the board. Several of the med-tech companies that are scrapping jobs say the 2.3% medical device excise tax in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, slated to begin in January 2013. Others deny that the tax is the sole cause of their moves, saying it's a factor but not determinative. Seven medical...
  • Superbug kills 7th person at Md. NIH hospital

    09/15/2012 4:43:18 PM PDT · by nuconvert · 13 replies
    A deadly germ untreatable by most antibiotics has killed a seventh person at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Maryland.
  • A Doctor's Thoughts on Antibiotics, Expiration Dates

    09/14/2012 4:31:38 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 142 replies
    Survival Blog ^ | 7/26/10 | Dr. Bones
    As a recently-retired physician who is married to a nurse-midwife, my preparedness group looks to us as the post-TEOTWAWKI hospital and medical staff. Medical progress has been exponential and even just the last decade of scientific breakthroughs can equal a century of improvement in medical treatments, surgical techniques and pharmaceuticals. However, in the years (months?) ahead, the crumbling of the infrastructure and devolution of society in general will very likely throw us back to a medical system that existed in the 19th Century. Let’s take an example: When the U.S. was a young nation, the average woman could expect to...
  • Regenerative Medicine Helps Rebuild Wounded Warriors

    09/13/2012 3:50:35 PM PDT · by Nachum · 7 replies
    abc ^ | 9/13/12 | KATIE MOISSE
    Ron Strang lay helpless in the dirt as the hole in his leg was packed with gauze and swathed in bandages. The Marine sergeant was on foot patrol in Afghanistan's Helmand Province when an improvised explosive device tore through his left thigh, shredding his muscle and draining half his blood. "I'm sure I would've died without the quick actions of my fellow Marines," said Strang, 28, who endured more than a dozen surgeries and painful skin grafts to close the gaping wound. Though his skin eventually healed, Strang was left with half the quadriceps he once had. "I had to...
  • Anti-inflammatories tied to cardiac risk

    09/11/2012 12:03:55 PM PDT · by neverdem · 33 replies
    ScienceNews ^ | September 10th, 2012 | Nathan Seppa
    Heart attack survivors using certain painkillers are more likely to die or suffer another event People who have survived a heart attack seem to increase their risk of having another one, or of dying, by taking common painkillers called NSAIDs, a popular class of drugs that includes ibuprofen. The unsettling link between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and heart attack risk is not new. The American Heart Association released guidelines in 2007 discouraging the use of any NSAIDs among people with a history of cardiovascular disease. Researchers in Denmark now bolster that link with the largest study to date of NSAID use...
  • The Obama Campaign Should Rethink The "GM Is Alive" Meme... (pic)

    09/10/2012 9:59:01 AM PDT · by The Looking Spoon · 7 replies
    The Looking Spoon ^ | 9-10-12 | The Looking Spoon
  • U.S. Health Care Waste Larger Than Pentagon Budget

    09/08/2012 2:36:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    The American Interest ^ | September 7, 2012 | Walter Russell Mead
    It’s not exactly earth-shaking news that there’s a lot of waste in the U.S. health care system, but this item we came across still managed to stagger us: A report by the Institute of Medicine estimates that as much as $750 billion is wasted in the U.S. health care system each year. Three quarters of a trillion dollars. Every year. As the Wall Street Journal notes, that’s bigger than the Pentagon budget, amounting to roughly 5 percent of GDP. The report offers a familiar laundry list of problems. Unnecessary services are the leading driver of waste, but administrative expenses and...
  • Marijuana Fights Cancer and Helps Manage Side Effects, Researchers Find

    09/08/2012 12:51:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 179 replies
    Newsweek/The Daily Beast ^ | Sep 6, 2012 | Martin A. Lee
    Cristina Sanchez, a young biologist at Complutense University in Madrid, was studying cell metabolism when she noticed something peculiar. She had been screening brain cancer cells because they grow faster than normal cell lines and thus are useful for research purposes. But the cancer cells died each time they were exposed to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive ingredient of marijuana. Instead of gaining insight into how cells function, Sanchez had stumbled upon the anti-cancer properties of THC. In 1998, she reported in a European biochemistry journal that THC “induces apoptosis [cell death] in C6 glioma cells,” an aggressive form of...
  • OMG, Obama Must Go, as TV AD Urges Voters Replace Him

    09/06/2012 9:23:12 AM PDT · by arthurus
    Right Side News ^ | 04 September 2012 | Eric Cornett
    As the political season heats up this Fall, a new television ad campaign has been released to the airwaves by Americans For Prosperity. If you’re like me, you’ve heard the stories over the years of Canadian citizens coming in droves across our northern border for decent health care (legally, I might add). In the latest Americans For Prosperity video ad, we hear the story of one Shona Holmes, a Canadian citizen who relied on American healthcare for her own wellbeing. “The American system was there for me when I needed it,” said Shona. “It’s time for American’s to get engaged...
  • Doctor refuses to treat overweight Shrewsbury patient

    09/01/2012 8:36:40 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 38 replies
    WCVB-TV (ABC - Boston) ^ | August 24, 2012 | Pam Cross
    SHREWSBURY, Mass. — Ida Davidson is the first to admit her weight goes up and down, but the Shrewsbury resident said she was stunned when a new primary care physician said she could not become a patient because she weighed more than 200 pounds.
  • Green Tea Eyed As Possible Skin Cancer Treatment

    08/23/2012 2:20:57 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 6 replies
    Medical Daily ^ | August 22, 2012 | Christine Hsu
    Scientists have discovered a chemical extract in green tea that can treat two types of skin cancer, without producing the harmful side effects associated with chemotherapy.While the epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) compound is too weak to make an impact when consumed in tea, scientists were able to kill or shrink two-thirds of cancer cells within a month when they applied the extract to tumor cells in the lab. What's more, the chemical compound did not appear to affect any other healthy cells or tissues in the body.Researchers from the universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow believe that their study is the first...
  • Dealing With Medical Emergencies (preppers)

    08/20/2012 8:52:47 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 22 replies
    Personal Liberty Digest ^ | August 20, 2012 | Bob Livingston
    The prepper can take many lessons from the situation that developed in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. One lesson is that when the social order breaks down for a period of days or weeks, adequate medical care will disappear. So preparedness requires a medical kit. And no medical survival kit is complete without a good book or two on emergency medicine, anatomy, drug reference and medical terminology. Some good ones to choose from are:
  • How Obamacare's $716 Billion in Cuts Will Drive Doctors Out of Medicare

    08/20/2012 4:50:47 AM PDT · by NCjim · 66 replies
    Forbes ^ | August 20, 2012
    There are 600,000 physicians in America who care for the 48 million seniors on Medicare. Of the $716 billion that the Affordable Care Act cuts from the program over the next ten years, the largest chunk—$415 billion—comes from slashing Medicare’s reimbursement rates to doctors, hospitals, and nursing homes. This significant reduction in fees is driving many doctors to stop accepting new Medicare patients, making it harder for seniors to gain access to needed care. Here are a few of their stories. Paul Wertsch is a primary physician in Madison, Wisconsin. In 1977, he and his two partners invested $500,000 of...
  • Diacetyl chemical in artificial butter popcorn linked to Alzheimer's plaque build-up (microwave)

    08/12/2012 10:20:39 AM PDT · by UnwashedPeasant · 12 replies
    CBS news ^ | 8/9/12
    (CBS News) An ingredient used in artificial butter flavoring for popcorn may worsen the effects of an abnormal brain protein that's been linked to Alzheimer's disease. A new study in Chemical Research in Toxicology examined diacetyl (DA), an ingredient used to produce the buttery flavor and smell in microwave popcorn, margarine, candy, baked goods, and even pet food. It is also created naturally in fermented drinks like beer, and gives some chardonnay wines its buttery taste, according to the study. Scientists at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis conducted an analysis of DA, a chemical which previously has been linked...
  • BCG Vaccine May Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

    08/11/2012 12:02:01 PM PDT · by Innovative · 18 replies
    Voice of America ^ | Aug 11, 2012 | Vidushi Sinha
    One of the world's oldest vaccines now has a new use. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin, or BCG, is an 80-year-old vaccine designed to tread tuberculosis. Bit it has now been found effective in treating long-term type 1 diabetes, which is on the rise worldwide. BCG has long been administered to children in developing countries to guard against tuberculosis. But in a recent clinical trial, researchers at Harvard Medical School found the vaccine was also able to increase insulin production in patients with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Denise Faustman, the lead researcher, says the team was able to cure type 1 diabetes in...
  • Obamacare Causes Doctor Shortage – Dick Morris TV: Lunch Alert!

    08/09/2012 8:30:25 AM PDT · by Signalman · 3 replies
    Dick Morris ^ | 8/9/2012 | Dick Morris
    Dear Friend, In this video commentary, I discuss how Obamacare is triggering a national doctor shortage, decreasing the quality of care for us all. Tune in!
  • Researchers discover gene that permanently stops cancer cell proliferation

    08/08/2012 12:28:15 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Medical Express ^ | 08-01-2012 | Provided by Case Western Reserve University
    Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered a mutant form of the gene, Chk1, that when expressed in cancer cells, permanently stopped their proliferation and caused cell death without the addition of any chemotherapeutic drugs. This study illustrates an unprecedented finding, that artificially activating Chk1 alone is sufficient to kill cancer cells. "We have identified a new direction for cancer therapy and the new direction is leading us to a reduction in toxicity in cancer therapy, compared with chemotherapy or radiation therapy," said Dr. Zhang, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacology at the School of Medicine, and...
  • Advice from a Physician: How to Avoid Obamacare

    08/07/2012 10:39:09 AM PDT · by arthurus · 40 replies
    Economic Policy Journal ^ | August 4, 2012 | Robert Wenzel
    Medical care is going to get worse under Obamacare. Robert S. Dotson, M.D. tells us why: As income reductions are being imposed on private practice, costs are being driven up by exploding regulations. In addition, the plethora of new mandates and laws have increasingly criminalized every aspect of the practice of medicine and created vast new armies of armed bureaucrats whose sole aim is to impose civil and criminal penalties on any provider unlucky enough to be singled out for attention... New restrictions, rules, and regulations on healthcare – on providers and patients alike – have imposed legal constraints with...
  • Chemo 'undermines itself' through rogue response (Could make cancer more resistant to treatment)

    08/06/2012 2:33:57 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    BBC ^ | 08/06/2012
    Chemotherapy can undermine itself by causing a rogue response in healthy cells, which could explain why people become resistant, a study suggests. The treatment loses effectiveness for a significant number of patients with secondary cancers. Writing in Nature Medicine, US experts said chemo causes wound-healing cells around tumours to make a protein that helps the cancer resist treatment. A UK expert said the next step would be to find a way to block this effect. Around 90% of patients with solid cancers, such as breast, prostate, lung and colon, that spread - metastatic disease - develop resistance to chemotherapy. Treatment...
  • Chemotherapy Can Backfire and Boost Cancer Growth: Study

    08/05/2012 6:57:19 PM PDT · by dubyagee · 56 replies
    Yahoo ^ | August 5, 2012 | AFP
    Cancer-busting chemotherapy can cause damage to healthy cells which triggers them to secrete a protein that sustains tumour growth and resistance to further treatment, a study said Sunday. Researchers in the United States made the "completely unexpected" finding while seeking to explain why cancer cells are so resilient inside the human body when they are easy to kill in the lab. They tested the effects of a type of chemotherapy on tissue collected from men with prostate cancer, and found "evidence of DNA damage" in healthy cells after treatment, the scientists wrote in Nature Medicine. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/chemotherapy-backfire-boost-cancer-growth-study-164516832.html
  • Eye spy cyanide

    08/05/2012 3:43:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 24 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 3 August 2012 | Francesca Burgoyne poisoning
    The two-step method to detect cyanide. (A) Adding a chemosensor to a blood sample, followed by extracting the purple chemosensor–cyano complex from the sample. (B) Washing the column with water The colour of cyanide poisoning is purple, according to researchers in Switzerland who have developed a method that enables them to quickly detect blood cyanide levels through a simple colour change. Cyanide poisoning as a result of smoke inhalation can have serious or fatal consequences unless an antidote is rapidly administered. Current methods for determining cyanide poisoning, including microdiffusion, microdistillation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detection, can take up to an...
  • Bacteria-immune system 'fight' can lead to chronic diseases, study suggests

    08/04/2012 7:16:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | August 2, 2012 | NA
    Results from a study conducted at Georgia State University suggest that a "fight" between bacteria normally living in the intestines and the immune system, kicked off by another type of bacteria, may be linked to two types of chronic disease. The study suggests that the "fight" continues after the instigator bacteria have been cleared by the body, according to Andrew Gewirtz, professor of biology at the GSU Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection. That fight can result in metabolic syndrome, an important factor in obesity, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The results were published in the journal Cell Host &...
  • Squabble Over NEJM Paper Puts Spotlight on Antishock Drug

    08/04/2012 1:34:09 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 2 August 2012 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    A seemingly small mistake in a paper in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) landed a Danish physician-researcher in hot water last month after a German company threatened to sue him for potential losses that could run in the millions of dollars. The exchange prompted media consternation in Denmark over whether academic freedom was being censored, but the researcher, Anders Perner of Copenhagen University Hospital has corrected the error, which occurred in the publication of a study of a widely used drug to prevent shock, and thereby averted legal action. Still, the episode has shone a light on a...
  • Evidence Grows That Cancer Has Its Own Stem Cells

    08/01/2012 1:45:54 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    US News – HealthDay ^ | August 1, 2012 | Lisa Esposito
    While scientists hotly debate the existence of cancer stem cells, three related new studies, all conducted on mice, provide some supporting evidence. Stem cells are the foundation for healthy cell growth in the body. Some researchers believe that malignant stem cells also exist—so-called cancer stem cells that generate tumors and resist treatment by simply re-growing afterward. "Cancer stem cells are still controversial, but with progress in studies like these, it's less about whether they exist and more about 'what does this mean?'" said Dr. Max Wicha, director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, who is familiar with the...
  • How Come People Rarely Die of Dementia in Poor Countries?

    07/31/2012 10:28:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    PJMedia ^ | 07/31/2012 | THEODORE DALRYMPLE
    When I was a young doctor working in poor countries, I made a casual observation that old people in them did not seem to suffer very often from dementia. It occurred to me that properly conducted surveys, of the kind that I was not suited to performing, might be valuable, because a difference in the incidence and prevalence of dementia in various countries might offer a clue to the cause of the disease. As populations throughout the world age, this is a matter of increasing importance.But was my initial casual observation true? And, if true, might the explanation not be...
  • Rationing Begins: States Limiting Drug Prescriptions for Medicaid Patients

    07/31/2012 9:04:32 AM PDT · by IbJensen · 43 replies
    CNS News ^ | 7/30/2012 | Melanie Hunter
    CNSNews.com) – Sixteen states have set a limit on the number of prescription drugs they will cover for Medicaid patients, according to Kaiser Health News. Seven of those states, according to Kaiser Health News, have enacted or tightened those limits in just the last two years. Medicaid is a federal program that is carried out in partnership with state governments. It forms an important element of President Barack Obama's health-care plan because under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act--AKA Obamcare--a larger number of people will be covered by Medicaid, as the income cap is raised for the program. With...
  • Britain’s NHS: No Fun and Games (Why on earth was the NHS celebrated in the London Olympics?)

    07/30/2012 9:46:30 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 29 replies
    National Review ^ | 07/30/2012 | John Fund
    The International Olympic Committee decided not to include in the opening ceremony a moment of silence to honor the eleven Israeli athletes killed by Palestinian gunmen during the 1972 games in Munich. That move drew the ire of NBC’s Bob Costas. During Friday’s ceremony, he commented that, although a private moment of silence was held before a mere 100 people this week at the Athlete’s Village, “for many, tonight, with the world watching, is the true time and place to remember those who were lost and how and why they died.” Instead, the Olympic ceremony featured a weird, politically correct...
  • Doctor of Colorado suspect had been disciplined by medical board

    07/29/2012 1:37:33 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 55 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 29, 2012 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
    <p>AURORA, Colo. -- Dr. Lynne Fenton, the University of Colorado psychiatrist who was treating James E. Holmes, according to a court filing by his attorneys, was disciplined by the Colorado Medical Board in 2005.</p> <p>Fenton was also reprimanded for failing to maintain a medical chart or to enter appropriate entries for the charts relating to herself, her husband or the employee, 7News reported.</p>
  • 'Bionic eye' implant restores sight

    07/23/2012 12:13:06 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Guide and Gazette ^ | July 23, 2012
    BBC News today reported that “two blind British men have had electronic retinas fitted”. Chris James, 54, and Robin Millar, 60, took part in a clinical trial coordinated by Oxford University and funded by the National Institute of Health Research. Both men have retinitis pigmentosa, a rare hereditary condition that causes gradual deterioration of the light-detecting cells in the retina, which can lead to blindness. The electronic retinas are implants containing light detectors designed to replace the lost light-detecting cells. Immediately following the procedures, when the implants were switched on, both men were able to detect light and are now...
  • Report: 83 percent of doctors have considered quitting over Obamacare

    07/09/2012 11:54:34 AM PDT · by Nachum · 27 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 7/9/12 | Sally Neilson
    Eighty-three percent of American physicians have considered leaving their practices over President Barack Obama’s health care reform law, according to a survey released by the Doctor Patient Medical Association. The DPMA, a non-partisan association of doctors and patients, surveyed a random selection of 699 doctors nationwide. The survey found that the majority have thought about bailing out of their careers over the legislation, which was upheld last month by the Supreme Court. Even if doctors do not quit their jobs over the ruling, America will face a shortage of at least 90,000 doctors by 2020. The newly passed health care...
  • Synthetic protein kick-starts the immune system to prevent all strains of the flu

    07/09/2012 10:44:45 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 7 replies
    Gizmag / Dan Diego State University ^ | July 09, 2012 | Darren Quick
    We've seen promising moves towards developing a universal or near-universal influenza vaccine, but researchers at the Donald P. Shiley BioScience Center have taken a different tack to ward of the crafty virus. Although the flu virus actively keeps the immune system from detecting it for a few days, giving it time to gain a foothold, the researchers have found that a powerful synthetic protein, known as EP67, can kick start the immune system so that it reacts almost immediately to all strains of the virus. Previously, EP67 had primarily been used to help activate the immune response by being added...
  • Henninger: ObamaCare's Lost Tribe: Doctors

    07/08/2012 5:47:58 PM PDT · by george76 · 9 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | July 5, 2012 | Henninger
    Back at the at the dawn of ObamaCare in June 2009, speaking to the American Medical Association's annual meeting, President Obama said: "No matter how we reform health care, we will keep this promise: If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor. Period." But will your doctor be able to keep you? Or will your doctor even want to keep you, rather than quit medicine? ... Have you noticed what got lost in this historic rumble? Doctors. Remember them? ObamaCare has been a war over the processing of insurance claims. It has been fought by...
  • Child heart surgery units to learn fate (UK to close 40% if units)

    07/04/2012 6:01:30 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | July 4, 2012 | By Nick Triggle
    The hospitals that perform child heart surgery are due to learn which will have to stop performing operations. There are 10 units in England, but an official consultation has proposed up to four should cease doing surgery. The NHS review was carried out amid fears expertise was spread too thinly, and has already concluded surgery should be concentrated on fewer sites. Centres in Leicester, Leeds, Newcastle, Southampton, Bristol and London are under threat.
  • The Healthcare Myths We Must Confront

    06/29/2012 7:28:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    The American ^ | June 29, 2012 | Cliff Asness
    As debate about whether ObamaCare is a good idea continues, rejecting four major misconceptions about healthcare is crucial to any chance of our eventually emerging with a better system. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ObamaCare decision, we must refocus. The Court’s decision was never about whether ObamaCare was a good idea, only about whether it was constitutional. The Court found a convoluted way to uphold the law.That’s done, but the debate on whether ObamaCare’s provisions are good ideas will continue. To date, this debate has been unable to shake off a lot of mythology—things believed about healthcare and...
  • The Changing of the Guards - Not Good

    06/29/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT · by Accepting The Truth · 31 replies
    6/28/2012 | Betty Harmon
    I never will forget when I persuaded my husband to vote for Obama as I just knew he was THE man. Now, I feel guilty and cannot believe that I was so taken in by his smoothe personality and the moment. When I hear comments that our country is spiraling out of control I now connect the dots and think of it as a battle already lost to one that doesn’t deserve it. We’ve become a gullible people and are deceived by a selfish and materialistic world. We look over the rough spots because we cannot look upon the truth...
  • How little government sponsored Healthcare do we need? {Vanity}

    06/25/2012 1:20:10 AM PDT · by Cronos · 17 replies
    Cronos ^ | 19 June 2012 | Cronos
    I've been thinking about this for years and want to get my fellow Freeper's opinions --> how little healthcare/medicare do we need as a nation?There are two extremes: government is not involved in any medicare at all, or the other extreme is ObamacareAs a young adult, I'm inclined to the zero government, zero tax-money going to healthcare/medicare. However, I also believe that we young have an obligation to take care of our parents and our other aged relatives. That being said, I look on it as a Christian duty, separate from gubmint. What do you freepers think? Where along the...
  • Tumor op in womb saves fetus

    06/24/2012 2:09:48 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 4 replies
    BBC News ^ | 22 June 2012 | Last updated at 05:15 ET
    Surgeons have removed a tumor from the mouth of a fetus, in what has been described as a "world first" procedure. After a scan at 17 weeks, mother Tammy Gonzalez said she "could see a bubble" coming out of her baby's mouth. Doctors said it was a very rare tumor called an oral teratoma and there was little chance her daughter would survive. After the pioneering operation, baby Leyna was born five months later. Doctors at the Jackson Memorial Hospital in Florida, said this type of tumor was so rare it had been seen only once in 20 years at...