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Keyword: lydia

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  • On The Origin Of The Etruscan Civilisation

    02/14/2007 8:39:18 AM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 1,054+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 2-14-2007 | Michael Day
    On the origin of the Etruscan civilisation 00:01 14 February 2007 NewScientist.com news service Michael Day Etruscan cippus (grave marker) in the shape of a warrior head. Found in Orvieto, Italy One of anthropology's most enduring mysteries - the origins of the ancient Etruscan civilisation - may finally have been solved, with a study of cattle. This culturally distinct and technologically advanced civilisation inhabited central Italy from about the 8th century BC, until it was assimilated into Roman culture around the end of the 4th century BC. The origins of the Etruscans, with their own non-Indo-European language, have been debated...
  • Lydia Or Neo-Caesarea Or Alasehir? Just Call It Philadelphia

    02/09/2019 2:29:11 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 11 replies
    Hidden City Philadelphia ^ | 2012 | Harry Kyriakodis
    Every good Philadelphian knows that the word “Philadelphia” comes from the Greek words meaning “Brotherly Love.” (More accurately: Philadelphos means “one who loves his brother.”) What was William Penn thinking of when he named the city? Moreover, was this the first City of Brotherly Love? Let’s first take a look at the “Prayer For Philadelphia” that William Penn penned in 1684, before he departed the fledgling city for the first of two times: And thou, Philadelphia, the virgin settlement of this Province, named before thou were born, What love, What care, What service and What travail has there been to...
  • Traces of war found in ancient Lydian city Sardis

    07/24/2018 9:05:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 13, 2018 | MANGSA - DHA
    Military equipment has been unearthed in the ancient city of Sardis in the western province of Manisa's Salihli district. Officials believe they might have been used in an ancient war between the Lydians and the Persians. The ancient city of Sardis, which was the capital of the Lydian Kingdom in the ancient ages and had been home to many civilizations from seventh B.C. to seventh A.D., is now undergoing excavation works. This year's works continue in an area called the "Palace" region... The military equipment is believed to have been used in the war that caused the end of the...
  • Arzawa

    11/26/2004 7:32:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 812+ views
    The language of the southwestern littoral of Anatolia - which includes Arzawa - was Luwiyan, which, like Kneshian, was a member of the Anatolian branch of the Indo-European family. For diplomatic correspondence, however, Arzawa used Kneshian - even when writing to the Egyptian king! It appears that this diplomatic faux pas was a result of Arzawa's provincial character; Kneshian was the language required to deal with the other states of Asia Minor, and especially with Hattusas.
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 11 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Unearthed: The Humble Origins Of World Diplomacy (Hittites)

    01/18/2003 2:51:58 PM PST · by blam · 42 replies · 847+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 1-19-2003 | David Keys
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • Herodutus Life Situation Affected his History

    10/02/2005 1:59:19 AM PDT · by F14 Pilot · 13 replies · 2,583+ views
    How the life Herodotus lived affected his history writing is a subject of dispute among many experts The question of how social conditions affecting Herodotus’s personal life affected his writing history may raise many disputes among historians. “The state where Herodotus was born in was under Persian Empire at that time; it was governed by Lygdamis, who put to death the poet Panyasis, a relative of Herodotus, for opposition and riots against Persia. Following this event, Herodotus had to leave his native city and went to Samos Island in Athena, and ever since he inhabited in Greek lands. But since...
  • Two tumuluses found in Turkey's ancient Daskyleion

    09/24/2010 6:28:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    World Bulletin ^ | Tuesday, 21 September 2010 | AA
    Archaeologists have discovered two tumuluses during the excavations in the ancient city of Daskyleion in the northwestern province of Balikesir. Associate Professor Kaan Iren from the Mugla University who heads the excavation team, told reporters, "we found a gate in one of the tumuluses which leads to a grave chamber. There were remains of two skeletons in the grave. We believe that they belonged to noble people or to members of the royal family." "We also unearthed remains of a wooden desk in the tumulus. A glass bracelet, a silver earring, a perfume bottle and more than 30 coins were...
  • "King's" villas cause outrage [Caria, in modern Turkey]

    05/17/2008 11:11:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 190+ views
    Voices Newspaper ^ | Saturday, May 17, 2008 | editor
  • Archaeologists find signs of ancient advertisements from Sassanid era

    08/21/2004 2:34:39 AM PDT · by BlackVeil · 28 replies · 1,269+ views
    Tehran Times ^ | August 21 2004 | Anon
    TEHRAN (MNA) -- During the latest season of excavations of the northern gate of Takht-e Suleiman, an ancient Zoroastrian fire temple located in northwestern Iran, the stamps of two seals were discovered which indicate that objects entered Takht-e Suleiman from other regions with special tags attached to them which seem to be advertisements. They signify that an early form of advertising was being practiced during the Sassanid era (224-642 C.E.), Yusef Moradi, the head of the excavation team, said on Friday. “The team began its excavations in early August and found the stamps of two seals at the upper levels...
  • Ancient Persian fleet surrenders it's mysteries

    08/21/2004 1:17:11 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 16 replies · 2,133+ views
    New Zealand News ^ | 8/21/04 | SIMON COLLINS
    Secrets of an ancient Persian armada sunk off the coast of Greece 2500 years ago are being dredged up by modern archaeologists. A team from Greece, Canada and the United States has just completed a second expedition to retrieve artefacts from 300 ships of the Persian King Darius that were wrecked in a storm off the Mt Athos Peninsula, northern Greece, in 492BC or 493BC. Aucklanders will be among the first to hear the results today when three of the expedition leaders present their findings in a free public lecture at Auckland University. In two trips so far, last October...
  • New Plan to Renovate Iran's Historical Cyrus Mausoleum

    07/11/2004 3:41:05 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 6 replies · 1,254+ views
    Payvand ^ | 7/10/04 | Payvand
    The mausoleum of Cyrus the Great, founder of the Achaemenid Empire, would be buttressed and renovated following its recent inscription on UNESCO’s prestigious World Heritage List. The mausoleum is part of the Pasargadae historical site, added as Iran’s sixth entry on the list during the 28th Session of the World heritage Committee in China. It is one of the outstanding examples of the first phase of royal Achaemenid art and architecture and an exceptional testimony of Persian Civilization. Dating back to 2,500 years ago, the burial chamber is surrounded by royal gardens and has been a sacred place ever since,...