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Keyword: longevity

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  • Chili peppers can decrease colorectal cancer risk, claims new research

    08/02/2014 6:16:12 AM PDT · by Innovative · 50 replies
    Tech Times ^ | Aug 2, 2014 | Judy Mottl
    If you don't eat chili peppers or hot curry much you may want to reassess that given new research that claims the peppers and curry can play a role in reducing the risk of colorectal and bowel tumors, as well as extend a person's lifespan by 30 percent. The study claims the active ingredient in chili peppers, called dietary capsaicin, decreases the cancer risk as it triggers chronic activation of an ion channel called TRPV1, which is a sensory neuron that protects the intestine against acidity and spicy chemicals. In essence adding chili peppers and hot curries to the diet...
  • At 116, Arkansas woman named oldest American

    07/04/2014 2:08:43 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    ABC ^ | 7-4-2014 | Jill Bleed
    A south Arkansas woman celebrated her 116th birthday Friday with cake, a party and a new title — she's now officially the oldest confirmed living American and second-oldest person in the world, the Gerontology Research Group said. Gertrude Weaver spent her birthday at home at Silver Oaks Health and Rehabilitation in Camden, about 100 miles southwest of Little Rock. This year's festivities included the new award from the Gerontology Research Group, which analyzed U.S. Census records to determine that Weaver is the oldest living American, rather than 115-year-old Jeralean Talley, who was born in 1899. The research group, which consults...
  • UPS Drivers Who Avoid Accidents for 25 Years Get Arm Patch and Bomber Jacket

    06/05/2014 7:11:34 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 6-5-14 | Lauara Stevens
    Chadd Bunker says his friends and relatives tell him he drives like an old man. Roll through a stop sign? He would never do that. Exceed the speed limit? Not on your life. He makes three right turns to avoid a left. He can be annoying. But Mr. Bunker, who is only 48 years old, is no ordinary driver. He recently became one of the proud, lucky few to reach the delivery driver equivalent of Eagle Scout—the United Parcel Service Inc. UPS +0.12% 's Circle of Honor. The award goes to those who manage to drive their big brown trucks...
  • British pensioners to be told how long they have to live so they can manage savings

    04/18/2014 6:55:55 AM PDT · by Loyalist · 14 replies
    Financial Post ^ | 18 April 2014 | Peter Dominiczak, The Telegraph
    Pensioners will be given estimates of how long they have left to live to help them manage their savings, a minister has disclosed. Steve Webb said that the Government wants to provide pensioners with a rough life expectancy when they reach retirement to allow them to make better financial decisions. Experts will take into account factors including gender, where a pensioner lives or whether they smoke, the pensions minister said. Life expectancy should be part of “guidance” given to help people decide how much to save. In last month’s Budget, George Osborne announced the scrapping of rules that force most...
  • Regardless of exercise, too much sedentary time is linked to major disability after 60

    02/22/2014 6:33:22 AM PST · by daniel1212 · 28 replies
    Northwestern University ^ | February 19, 2014 | Sciencedaily.com
    If you're 60 and older, every additional hour a day you spend sitting is linked to doubling the risk of being disabled -- regardless of how much moderate exercise you get, reports a new Northwestern Medicine® study. The study is the first to show sedentary behavior is its own risk factor for disability, separate from lack of moderate vigorous physical activity. In fact, sedentary behavior is almost as strong a risk factor for disability as lack of moderate exercise. If there are two 65-year-old women, one sedentary for 12 hours a day and another sedentary for 13 hours a day,...
  • Study: Racism May Accelerate Aging In African-American Men

    COLLEGE PARK, Md. (CBSDC) – Accelerated aging and a greater likelihood of suffering from an age-related illness at a younger age are two consequences being linked to African-American men who have experienced high-levels of racism throughout their lives. A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that African-American men who reported high levels of racial discrimination, or who have internalized anti-black attitudes, have an increased risk of premature death and chronic disease than white people. Previous research has documented African-Americans’ shorter life expectancy and greater risk of chronic diseases, but this new study is the first to...
  • Scientists Develop An 'Elixir' That Reverses A Known Cause Of Aging

    12/22/2013 1:43:02 AM PST · by Windflier · 22 replies
    i09.com ^ | 20 December 2013 | George Dvorsky
    To date, we know of only two things that can reverse the effects of aging: caloric restriction and extensive exercise. But in a recent experiment, researchers applied a new compound to 2-year old mice, causing their muscles to regenerate to 6-month old levels. Incredibly, human trials may start next year. The new compound, nicotinamide mono nucleotide (NMN), worked surprisingly quickly when tested on mice. When administered early enough in the aging process, it was found to work within one week; the muscles of older 2-year old mice were "indistinguishable" from the younger 6-month old animals. It improved muscle wastage, restored...
  • As More People Live Longer Why Are Rates of Dementia Falling?

    12/12/2013 8:58:57 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    Pajamas Media ^ | 12/12/2013 | THEODORE DALRYMPLE
    There is nothing quite as difficult to predict as the future. In my lifetime I have already lived through an “inevitable” ice age that never materialized and “inevitable” mass starvation (through overpopulation) that also never happened. When I was in Central America I remember reading a book called Inevitable Revolutions by the historian Walter LaFeber, but more than a quarter of a century later the inevitable still had not taken place. By now, according to predictions, most of us should have been dead from AIDS, that is if variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease or Ebola virus had not got us first. The...
  • People who drink alcohol outlive those who abstain, study shows

    12/10/2013 11:31:11 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 36 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | 11 December 2013
    Research published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research found those who did not consume any alcohol appeared to have a higher mortality rate, regardless of whether they were former heavy drinkers or not, than those who drank heavily. Instead, “moderate” drinking, defined as one to three drinks per day, was associated with the lowest mortality rate. …
  • On Dying After your Time

    12/02/2013 1:16:26 PM PST · by Haiku Guy · 66 replies
    HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, N.Y. — THIS fall Google announced that it would venture into territory far removed from Internet search. Through a new company, Calico, it will be “tackling” the “challenge” of aging. (snip) Even if anti-aging research could give us radically longer lives someday, though, should we even be seeking them? Regardless of what science makes possible, or what individual people want, aging is a public issue with social consequences, and these must be thought through. (snip) We may properly hope that scientific advances help ensure, with ever greater reliability, that young people manage to become old people. We are not,...
  • Ten Countries Where People Live Longest

    12/02/2013 8:51:50 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    Wall Street 24X7 ^ | 12/02/2013 | By Alexander E.M. Hess, Thomas C. Frohlich and Michael B. Sauter
    Life expectancy in the U.S. has risen in the past few decades. While in 1970 life expectancy at birth was 70.9 years, it rose to 78.7 year by 2011. However, most of the developed world is improving faster than this country. And despite the fact that the U.S. spends vastly more per capita on health care than any other country, Americans’ life expectancy is only 26th highest. Earlier this month, the Organizations for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released a report highlighting the latest life expectancy figures for its 34 member nations as well as several other developed nations. According...
  • Need Freeper Analysis of Longevity Rates in Developed Nations

    11/24/2013 7:05:36 AM PST · by LS · 28 replies
    self | 11/24/2013 | LS
    Yesterday I heard a quack health foods doc on the radio repeat something we hear a great deal, only he claimed to have a source for it, namely that the U.S. is down the list in life expectancy among developed nations. Supposedly this was a study from the Journal of the American Medical Association. I have some ideas as to why this may be (if indeed true) but I'd like some Freepers involved in medicine/insurance or other health-related fields to weigh in. What would account for the US having shorter life spans than, say, places such as Denmark or France?
  • Google launches healthcare company

    09/19/2013 11:25:43 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    The Financial Times ^ | September 18, 2013 | Richard Waters
    Google has launched a healthcare company to attack some of the most difficult scientific problems in diseases related to ageing, marking the biggest step yet beyond its core internet business. Larry Page, chief executive, unveiled the venture, called Calico, with a characteristically ambitious and vague claim that “with some longer term, moonshot thinking around healthcare and biotechnology, I believe we can improve millions of lives”. While outlining a highly ambitious overall goal for the new company, however, Google did not disclose any information about how much it would invest in the venture, which areas of healthcare science the spin-off company...
  • World’s oldest man dies in NY at age 112

    09/14/2013 6:53:00 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep 14, 2013 8:47 PM EDT
    The world’s oldest man, a 112-year-old self-taught musician, coal miner and gin rummy aficionado from western New York, has died. He was 112. Salustiano Sanchez-Blazquez died Friday at a nursing home in Grand Island, according to Robert Young, senior gerontology consultant with Guinness World Records. Sanchez-Blazquez became the world’s oldest man when Jiroemon Kimura died June 12 at age 116. …
  • rDNA Genes May Be Key to Human Longevity

    09/09/2013 4:47:38 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 2 replies
    An international team of researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology has found evidence that ageing works through a special set of genes that everyone has – the rDNA genes.Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, shown here, over the past two decades have found a connection between rDNA genes and lifespan. “This work is exciting because it shows that rDNA instability is a new factor in ageing,” said study co-author Dr Austen Ganley from Massey University, New Zealand. Dr Ganley and his colleagues from Japan found that by improving the stability of the rDNA genes they could extend the lifespan...
  • The revolutionary blood test that could predict how long you'll live

    07/09/2013 9:02:11 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 36 replies
    Mail Online ^ | July 9,2013 | EMMA INNES
    Chemical 'fingerprint' in the blood could provide clues to health later in life Metabolites indicate future lung function, bone density, and blood pressure Could pave the way for new treatments for age related conditionsA revolutionary new blood test could tell you how long you will live, and how quickly you will age. Scientists have discovered a chemical ‘fingerprint’ in the blood that may provide clues to an infant's health and rate of ageing near the end of life. The discovery raises the prospect of a simple test at birth that could help doctors stave off the ravages of disease in...
  • World's oldest man Jiroemon Kimura dies at 116 after life which spanned three centuries

    06/12/2013 6:32:24 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 48 replies
    Japan's Jiroemon Kimura, who was born in 1897, died in hospital early Wednesday morning, Kyodo News cited the local government as saying. Mr Kimura, from Kyotango in Kyoto Prefecture, was recognised by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest living person in December 2012 when a woman from the United States died at the age of 115.
  • Saudi Dies at 120; Leaves 98-Year Old Son, 446 Other Progeny

    04/25/2013 2:02:29 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Wednesday, April 24, 2013
    Sheikh Awad left behind 24 sons and daughters from various wivesSaudi Arabia’s oldest man died at the age of 120 years, leaving behind 447 children, grand children and great grand children, including his 98-year-old eldest son. Sheikh Awad bin Abdul Aziz bin Saifi Al Qarni died of old age at his house in the central village of Al Badadha although he was in a good health just before his demise. The chief of his tribe for most of his life, Sheikh Awad left behind 24 sons and daughters from various wives, including his eldest son, 98, youngest 22-year-old son and...
  • Russian billionaire’s plan for immortality by 2045 includes turning us into cyborgs

    04/05/2013 9:53:28 AM PDT · by null and void · 53 replies
    Electronic Products ^ | 4/1/13 | Nicolette Emmino
    This article was posted on 04/01/2013 Russian billionaire’s plan for immortality by 2045 includes turning us into cyborgs Technology may be advancing, but it doesn’t change the fact that the human body is limited. Eventually, human beings die.  Maybe immortality sounds like science fiction, especially when thinking about cyborgs, avatars, and robots, but for one Russian man, living forever in a machine’s body is the future, and it’s not so far away. After Dmitry Itskov made a fortune as founder of a web publishing company, New Media Stars, he began thinking about the meaning of life and consciousness. Last February, Itskov gathered...
  • Sausages And Bacon Linked To Premature Death

    03/07/2013 7:52:36 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 109 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 03/07/2013 | Jennifer Welsh
    If you love sausages, hot dogs, and brats, you might be in for a shorter life, a new study suggests. The study analyzed data from half a million men and women, as a part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. It was published in the journal BMC Medicine [PDF]. They found a link between "processed" meat — which includes all meat products, including ham, bacon, sausages; small part of minced meat that has been bought as a ready-to-eat product — and cardiovascular disease and cancer, they report. Also, they found that the more processed meat you eat...
  • Study: Pessimists live longer, healthier lives

    03/02/2013 5:38:41 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 59 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 28 Feb 13 14:20 CET | (AFP/jlb)
    Older people who look on the darker side of life tend to live longer than optimists, who in turn face an increased risk of illness and mortality, a new study by a German research institute found on Thursday. Researchers in Germany and Switzerland found that older people who believe their life satisfaction will be above average in future face a 10-percent higher mortality risk or are more likely to develop physical health problems, the DIW think-tank said. “It is possible that a pessimistic outlook leads elderly people to look after themselves and their health better and take greater precautions against...
  • Discovery Opens Door to a Fountain of Youth

    02/05/2013 9:05:46 AM PST · by null and void · 9 replies
    Older and fitter? New findings from a UC Berkeley-led study could have implications for the development of treatments for age-related degenerative diseases. A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, represents a major advance in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind aging while providing new hope for the development of targeted treatments for age-related degenerative diseases. Researchers were able to turn back the molecular clock by infusing the blood stem cells of old mice with a longevity gene and rejuvenating the aged stem cellsÂ’ regenerative potential. The findings were published online on January 31, 2013),...
  • Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever

    01/27/2013 10:33:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    The New York Times ^ | January 25, 2013 | Andrew Goldman
    As a futurist, you are famous for making predictions of when technological innovations will actually occur. Are you willing to predict the year you will die? My plan is to stick around. We’ll get to a point about 15 years from now where we’re adding more than a year every year to your life expectancy. To clarify, you’re predicting your immortality. The problem is I can’t get on the phone with you in the future and say, “Well, I’ve done it, I have lived forever,” because it’s never forever. You have described microscopic nanobots of the future that will be...
  • OPINION: Is human longevity due to grandmothers or older fathers?

    10/31/2012 2:08:41 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    UNSW ^ | 10/30/12 | Rob Brooks
    Why do humans tend to live such a long time? Our closest relatives, the chimpanzees, can last into their mid forties in the wild. Yet somewhere in the last six million years, human lifespans have lengthened dramatically, so that living into our seventies is no big surprise. The last few weeks have seen some exciting new developments in this area. First, a recent paper featured in The Conversation showed that at all ages, humans are less likely to die than chimps. Excitingly, however, modern health care, diets and the steady decline in violent deaths have slashed mortality rates of young...
  • Scientists find the secret of longer life for men (the bad news: Castration is the key)

    09/25/2012 10:03:55 AM PDT · by null and void · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 19:04 EST, 24 September 2012 | Mark Prigg
    Scientists have found a sure-fire way for men to live longer - but most red-blooded males will find the method unpalatably painful. Researchers in Korea have shown that eunuchs outlived other men by a significant margin. They say their findings suggest that male sex hormones are responsible for shortening the lives of men. A Turkish chief eunuch from the 18th Century. Researchers now believe that eunuchs may live longer The evidence comes after careful study of genealogy records of noble members of the Imperial court of the Korean Chosun dynasty (AD 1392-1910). Kyung-Jin Min, of Inha University, said: 'This discovery...
  • Eunuchs reveal clues to why women live longer than men

    09/25/2012 6:46:49 AM PDT · by Renfield · 42 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9-24-2012 | James Gallagher
    Castration had a huge effect on the lifespans of Korean men, according to an analysis of hundreds of years of eunuch "family" records. They lived up to 19 years longer than uncastrated men from the same social class and even outlived members of the royal family. The researchers believe the findings show male hormones shorten life expectancy. The study is published in the journal Current Biology. Castration before puberty prevents the shift from boy to man. One of the scientists involved in the study, Dr Cheol-Koo Lee from Korea University, said: "The records said that eunuchs had some women-like appearances...
  • Calorie restriction falters in the long run - Genetics and healthy diets matter more for...

    08/29/2012 6:41:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies
    NATURE NEWS ^ | 29 August 2012 | Amy Maxmen
    Genetics and healthy diets matter more for longevity. To those who enjoy the pleasures of the dining table, the news may come as a relief: drastically cutting back on calories does not seem to lengthen lifespan in primates. The verdict, from a 25-year study in rhesus monkeys fed 30% less than control animals, represents another setback for the notion that a simple, diet-triggered switch can slow ageing. Instead, the findings, published this week in Nature1, suggest that genetics and dietary composition matter more for longevity than a simple calorie count. “To think that a simple decrease in calories caused such...
  • Key gene found responsible for chronic inflammation, accelerated aging and cancer

    05/28/2012 9:33:51 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    e! Science News ^ | May 25, 2012 | NA
    Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have, for the first time, identified a single gene that simultaneously controls inflammation, accelerated aging and cancer. "This was certainly an unexpected finding," said principal investigator Robert J. Schneider, PhD, the Albert Sabin Professor of Molecular Pathogenesis, associate director for translational research and co-director of the Breast Cancer Program at NYU Langone Medical Center. "It is rather uncommon for one gene to have two very different and very significant functions that tie together control of aging and inflammation. The two, if not regulated properly, can eventually lead to cancer development. It's an exciting scientific...
  • 'Personality Genes' May Help Account for Longevity

    05/29/2012 12:35:21 AM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 24, 2012 | NA
    "It's in their genes" is a common refrain from scientists when asked about factors that allow centenarians to reach age 100 and beyond. Up until now, research has focused on genetic variations that offer a physiological advantage such as high levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. But researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University have found that personality traits like being outgoing, optimistic, easygoing, and enjoying laughter as well as staying engaged in activities may also be part of the longevity genes mix. The findings, published online May 21 in the journal...
  • Coffee drinking linked to longer life

    05/17/2012 5:49:05 PM PDT · by Innovative · 65 replies
    CNN ^ | May 17, 2012 | By Amanda Gardner, Health.com
    Drinking a daily cup of coffee -- or even several cups -- isn't likely to harm your health, and it may even lower your risk of dying from chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests. NIH followed 400,000 men and women for 13 years, during which 13% died. In the study, both regular and decaf were associated with a lower risk of dying Overall, coffee drinkers were less likely than their peers to die during the study, and the more coffee they drank, the lower their mortality risk...
  • Coffee linked to lower risk of death (May be key to living longer)

    05/17/2012 12:25:07 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 05/17/2012 | Amina Khan
    A study that tracked health and coffee consumption finds that coffee-drinkers had a lower risk of death. Subjects who averaged four or five cups per day fared best, though it's not clear why. Researchers have some reassuring news for the legions of coffee drinkers who can't get through the day without a latte, cappuccino, iced mocha, double-shot of espresso or a plain old cuppa joe: That coffee habit may help you live longer. A new study that tracked the health and coffee consumption of more than 400,000 older adults for nearly 14 years found that java drinkers were less likely...
  • New estimates show black men gain, women lose in longevity

    04/20/2012 7:34:22 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 15 replies
    South Florida Sun-Sentinel ^ | April 19, 2012 | Diane C. Lade and Dana Williams
    Black men in South Florida have made tremendous strides in longevity, according to new estimates released Thursday. Those born in 2009 could expect to live 7 years longer than those born two decades earlier. But researchers with the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation — who calculated lifespans in every U.S. county in 1989, 1999 and 2009 — also said there was troubling news. The numbers show women's lifespan gains have slowed to a crawl nationwide. Also, how long one might live varies hugely among counties in the same state, hinting at differences in healthcare access.
  • Funny: Why Women Live Longer Than Men (9 Pics)

    Just for fun: Have you ever wondered why women live longer than men? Is it biological? Or, is it just because men do stupid stuff and get themselves killed a little more often? Presented here for your enjoyment are 9 photos showing how men often shorten their own lifespans. Why Women Live Longer Than Men
  • Together 74 years, Kirkland couple die less than a day apart

    08/10/2011 5:41:09 PM PDT · by Deo volente · 17 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | August 7, 2011 | Jeff Hodson
    Bob and Kay Sarver were married for more than 74 years. Last month, they died within 15 hours of each other. On Friday, they were laid to rest as one.
  • Living to see 100 is just luck, not lifestyle

    08/05/2011 7:14:22 PM PDT · by Clairity · 42 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | Aug 3, 2011 | Stephen Adams
    Taking regular exercise, drinking only in moderation and watching what you eat makes no difference to one's chances of reaching 100, research has found. Those who are lucky enough to qualify for a telegram from the Queen have simply been dealt a good genetic hand at birth, the study indicates. Academics studied almost 500 people between 95 and 109 and compared them with over 3,000 others born during the same period. They found those who lived extremely long lives ate just as badly, drank and smoked just as much, took just as little exercise and were just as likely to...
  • Who wants to live forever? Scientist sees aging cured

    07/06/2011 2:32:15 AM PDT · by Windflier · 30 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Jul 4, 2011 | Kate Kelland
    LONDON (Reuters) - If Aubrey de Grey's predictions are right, the first person who will live to see their 150th birthday has already been born. And the first person to live for 1,000 years could be less than 20 years younger. A biomedical gerontologist and chief scientist of a foundation dedicated to longevity research, de Grey reckons that within his own lifetime doctors could have all the tools they need to "cure" aging -- banishing diseases that come with it and extending life indefinitely. "I'd say we have a 50/50 chance of bringing aging under what I'd call a decisive...
  • New blood test can show how long you will live.

    05/16/2011 10:23:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 58 replies
    www.wtam.com ^ | 05-16-2011 | Staff
    MENLO PARK, Calif., May 13 (UPI) -- A blood test that measures the length of a person's telomeres -- a predictor of longevity -- may be available soon, U.S. and Spanish researchers say. "Knowing whether our telomeres are a normal length or not for a given chronological age will give us an indication of our health status and of our physiological 'age' even before diseases appear," Maria A. Blasco, who heads the Telomeres and Telomerase Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center and who co-founded the company Life Length, told Scientific American. Telomeres are caps on the ends of...
  • Mouse study turns fat-loss and longevity link on its head

    05/03/2011 1:32:14 PM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies
    SAN ANTONIO (April 22, 2011) — Since the 1930s scientists have proposed food restriction as a way to extend life in mice. Though feeding a reduced-calorie diet has indeed lengthened the life spans of mice, rats and many other species, new studies with dozens of different mouse strains indicate that food restriction does not work in all cases. Diet and fat loss Researchers at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio’s Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, with colleagues at the University of Colorado, studied the effect of food restriction on fat and weight loss in 41 genetically different...
  • The Key to a Long Life: Conscientious Habits

    04/09/2011 6:26:54 PM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies
    U.S. News & World Report ^ | April 8, 2011 | Philip Moeller
    Long before the age of gene therapy and miracle medical treatments, the secrets of long life were being gathered and revealed in a unique study of 1,500 children born about 1910. By studying these people throughout their lives, successive generations of researchers collected nearly 10 million pieces of observable data and have been able to produce solid insights into human longevity. "Most people who live to an old age do so not because they have beaten cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease; rather, the long-lived have mostly avoided serious ailments altogether," according to Howard S. Friedman and Leslie R....
  • Yes, sex can kill you, U.S. study shows

    03/23/2011 5:18:29 AM PDT · by jda · 41 replies
    Reuters ^ | 22 March 2011 | Julie Steenhuysen
    Sudden bursts of moderate to intense physical activity - such as jogging or having sex -- significantly increase the risk of having a heart attack . . .
  • Down with Gene Tyranny! Freeing ourselves from our genes

    02/24/2011 1:33:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies
    Reason ^ | February 22, 2011 | Ronald Bailey
    The idea of using genetic engineering to enhance human beings scares a lot of people. For example, at a 2006 meeting called by the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, Richard Hayes, the executive director of the left-leaning Center for Bioethics and Society, testified that “enhancement technologies would quickly be adopted by the most privileged, with the clear intent of widening the divisions that separate them and their progeny from the rest of the human species.” Deploying such enhancement technologies would “deepen genetic and biological inequality among individuals,” exacerbating “tendencies towards xenophobia, racism and warfare.” Hayes concluded that allowing...
  • Fountain of Youth from the Tap? Environmental Lithium Uptake Promotes Longevity...in Worms

    02/18/2011 7:47:18 PM PST · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2-18-2011 | staff
    A regular uptake of the trace element lithium can considerably promote longevity. This is the result of a new study by scientists of Friedrich Schiller University Professor Dr. Michael Ristow's team along with Japanese colleagues from universities in Oita and Hiroshima have demonstrated by two independent approaches that even a ow concentration of lithium leads to low concentration of lithium leads to an increased life expectancy in humans as well as in a mode humans as well as in a mode organism, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. The research team presents its results in the online edition of the scientific publication...
  • Ecuadorean Villagers May Hold Secret to Longevity

    02/18/2011 9:29:36 PM PST · by neverdem · 34 replies
    NY Times ^ | February 16, 2011 | NICHOLAS WADE
    People living in remote villages in Ecuador have a mutation that some biologists say may throw light on human longevity and ways to increase it. The villagers are very small, generally less than three and a half feet tall, and have a rare condition known as Laron syndrome or Laron-type dwarfism. They are probably the descendants of conversos, Sephardic Jews from Spain and Portugal who were forced to convert to Christianity in the 1490s but were nonetheless persecuted in the Inquisition. They are also almost completely free of two age-related diseases, cancer and diabetes. A group of 99 villagers with...
  • Fitness guru Jack LaLanne, 96, dies at Calif. home

    01/23/2011 6:39:55 PM PST · by massmike · 100 replies
    bostonherald.com ^ | 01/23/2011 | Associated Press
    Fitness guru Jack LaLanne, who inspired television viewers to trim down and pump iron decades before exercise became a national obsession, has died at age 96. His agent Rick Hersh says LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia Sunday afternoon at his home in Morro Bay on California’s central coast.
  • Longevity study confirms 'Latino Paradox': poor in wealth, rich in health

    10/25/2010 10:54:40 AM PDT · by neverdem · 24 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 10/14/2010 | Lisa M. Krieger
    The first-ever national study of Latino life expectancy reveals that Latinos in the United States live 2.5 years longer than their white counterparts -- a poor-in-wealth, rich-in-health paradox that mystifies doctors. A Latino baby in the U.S. will live to the average age of 80.6 years, compared with 78.1 years for a white baby, according to the new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study, released Wednesday. "This is surprising because of low social status," said Elizabeth Arias, of the CDC. Based on rates of poverty, education and access to care -- factors long known to be linked to...
  • Critics point to flaws in longevity study

    08/01/2010 11:04:59 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies · 3+ views
    Science News ^ | July 31st, 2010 | Tina Hesman Saey
    Questions have focused on the analytic platform used to find about 150 genetic variations linked to longevity Just like the fountain of youth, a study that purported to find genetic secrets to longevity may be a myth, critics say. Researchers led by Thomas Perls and Paola Sebastiani from Boston University reported July 1 in an online publication in Science that they had identified 150 genetic markers that distinguish centenarians from people with average life spans with 77 percent accuracy. Almost immediately the study came under fire because of a technical flaw. Most of the controversy stems from the devices used...
  • New study of centenarians links certain genetic variations to a long lifespan

    07/02/2010 1:39:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies
    Washington Post ^ | July 2, 2010 | Rob Stein
    Scientists studying aging have long been fascinated by those rare individuals who somehow manage not only to live at least 100 years but also remain relatively healthy and spry even in their final years. What's their secret? Is it clean living? A positive attitude? Or is it something in their genes? A federally funded study released Thursday took an important step toward trying to answer that question by scanning the genes of a large number of centenarians and identifying genetic signatures that appear linked with living a long, healthy life. "This is groundbreaking research," said Winifred K. Rossi, deputy director...
  • Calcium may help you live longer: study

    03/12/2010 2:50:45 PM PST · by decimon · 7 replies · 431+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mar 12, 2010 | Unknown
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Getting a bit more calcium in your diet could help you live longer, new research suggests. Swedish researchers found that men who consumed the most calcium in food were 25 percent less likely to die over the next decade than their peers who took in the least calcium from food. None of the men took calcium supplements. The findings are in line with previous research linking higher calcium intake with lower mortality in both men and women, the researchers point out in a report in the American Journal of Epidemiology. While many researchers have looked...
  • 2 of oldest people in US die: in NH 114, Mich. 113

    03/08/2010 6:32:55 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 7 replies · 57+ views
    Associated Press ^ | March 8, 2010
    WESTMORELAND, N.H. (AP) -- Two of the oldest people in the world have died on the same day, one in New Hampshire and one in Michigan. Mary Josephine Ray was certified as the oldest person living in the United States. Her granddaughter Katherine Ray says she died in a Westmoreland, N.H., nursing home Sunday at 114 years, 294 days. The Gerontology Research Group says Daisey Bailey died in Detroit hours later at 113 years, 342 days. The group tracks and studies old people and certifies those 110 or older, called supercentenarians.
  • Why those fat thighs may help you live longer

    01/13/2010 12:01:49 AM PST · by Cheap_Hessian · 35 replies · 1,428+ views
    Reuters ^ | January 12, 2010 | Maggie Fox
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - People with fat in their thighs and backsides may live longer because the fat traps harmful fatty particles and actively secretes helpful compounds, according to a report published on Tuesday. Many studies have shown that people who accumulate fat around the abdomen and stomach are more likely to die of heart disease and other causes than bottom-heavy people, but the reasons are not clear. This may be because several different mechanisms are involved, said Konstantinos Manolopoulos of Britain's University of Oxford. "It is the protective role of lower body, that is, gluteofemoral fat, that is striking," Manolopoulos...