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Keyword: health

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  • The Secret to a Long Life

    01/27/2014 3:51:28 AM PST · by Reaganite Republican · 10 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 27 January 2014 | Reaganite Republican
    A doctor on his morning walk, noticed the the nice lady above... She was sitting on her front step smoking a cigar, so he walked up to her and said:  "I couldn't help but notice how happy you look! What is your secret?"  "I smoke ten cigars a day, she said. Then, before I go to bed, I smoke a big, fat joint! Apart from that, I drink a whole bottle of Jack Daniels every week, and eat only junk food. On weekends, I do other drugs, have sex and, most importantly-- I don't exercise at all."  "That is...
  • Lower the thermostat, whittle your waistline?

    01/24/2014 7:57:46 AM PST · by smokingfrog · 20 replies
    NBC Montana ^ | 1-22-14 | Jacque Wilson
    You may want to program the thermostat in your office down a couple of degrees today, despite the more-than-chilly temperatures outside. A paper published Wednesday in the scientific journal Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism suggests doing so could help you lose weight. Regular exposure to mildly cold temperatures help people burn more calories, according to the paper's authors, who have been studying this phenomenon for more than a decade. "Since most of us are exposed to indoor conditions 90 percent of the time, it is worth exploring health aspects of ambient temperatures," lead author Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt said. "What...
  • Fish oil could help prevent Alzheimer's and also give you a bigger brain

    01/22/2014 7:14:40 PM PST · by Innovative · 13 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | Jan 22, 2014 | Jenny Hope
    Research shows people with higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may also have larger brain volumes in old age This would be the equivalent to preserving one or two years of brain health. Eating more fish could give you a bigger brain - and greater protection against diseases such as Alzheimer’s, claim researchers. They found people with higher levels of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may also have larger brain volumes in old age. This would be the equivalent to preserving one to two years of brain health, says a new study...
  • Raw Milk Could Be Legal in Maryland… Again

    01/22/2014 5:04:36 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 61 replies
    Freedom Outpost ^ | January 22, 2014 | Joshua Cook
    A proposed Maryland bill would restore the right of the states’ citizens to participate in cow shares, or cow boarding, to obtain raw milk. Maryland citizens lost the right to raw milk via cow shares in 2006, when the appointed director of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene redefined the word “sale” to include agistments. A hearing on the bill is scheduled for January 28 at 1:00pm at the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis. Cow shares or cow boarding refers to a practice in which people buy shares in individual animals for a portion of the milk...
  • California teen recovers devastating coma thanks fish oil

    01/19/2014 2:56:27 PM PST · by Kid Shelleen · 29 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 01/15/2014 | JOEL LANDAU
    With their teenage son in a coma, a California family was willing to try anything to bring him back. And with a new type of treatment, their son has made a miraculous recovery — thanks to fish oil. Grant Virgin, now 17, of Palm Desert, Calif., was involved in a near-tragic car accident last September when an unidentified woman crashed into him and drove off — even after stopping to survey the damage, the Desert Sun reported. Virgin was in a coma and was in really bad shape.
  • Should the Age to Buy Cigarettes Be 21?

    01/19/2014 8:20:38 AM PST · by rktman · 31 replies
    PJMedia ^ | 1/14/2014 | Theodore Dalrymple
    Just as a more permissive attitude to cannabis gains momentum in the United States, so does a more restrictive attitude to tobacco. It is as if there were a law of the conservation of prohibition: if one substance is permitted after having been prohibited, another will be prohibited after having been permitted. While Colorado permits the use of marijuana by those over 21 for any purpose, New York City prepares to prevent sales of tobacco to anyone under the age of 21. An article in a recent edition of the New England Journal of Medicine comes out strongly in favor...
  • 'Bio-Bot’ That Swims Like Sperm Is An 'Exciting Advance’ In Self-Propelled Biological Robots

    01/18/2014 1:16:21 PM PST · by Anton.Rutter · 7 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Jan 18, 2014 | Philip Ross
    Engineers are pioneering a new way to explore the viscous fluids of biological environments, like the inside of the human body, where microscopes are difficult to place. Called a “bio-bot,” the microscopic biological machine swims like a sperm, is powered by heart cells, propelled by a tail and can navigate the aquatic world of micro-organisms on its own.
  • Chinese Herbal Medicines Help Control Diabetes, Study

    01/18/2014 11:00:11 AM PST · by Innovative · 16 replies
    University Herald ^ | jan 18, 2014 | Stephen Adkins,
    Traditional Chinese herbal medicines have been found to effectively slow the progression from prediabetes to diabetes diagnosis in a clinical trial. Yuan said that traditional Chinese herbs can be used to control blood sugar levels, either by consuming alone or in combination with other treatments. The study will be published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM).
  • First North American death from bird flu (Canada)

    01/09/2014 8:45:46 AM PST · by Sir Napsalot · 44 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 1-9-2014 | (Unclear)
    The first fatal case of bird flu in North America has been reported in Canada. Officials in Canada said the victim, who was from Alberta, had just returned from Beijing. The unnamed victim, who was not identified, died on January 3, having been admitted to hospital on Jan 1. Four days earlier the victim, whose sex was not disclosed, had complained of a headache and fever. Rona Ambrose, the Canadian health minister, insisted this was an isolated case, although officials are trying to contact others on the flight.
  • FDA: Acetaminophen doses over 325 mg might lead to liver damage

    01/17/2014 6:10:07 AM PST · by Innovative · 27 replies
    CNN ^ | Jan 16, 2014 | Holly Yan
    Acetaminophen is often used in pain medications with opioids such as oxycodone (Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin) and codeine (Tylenol with Codeine). These are called combination drugs, and the Food and Drug Administration is asking doctors to stop prescribing those that have more than 325 mg of acetaminophen per dose. Acetaminophen overdose is one of the most common poisonings worldwide," according to the National Institutes of Health. Taking too much of this pain reliever can lead to liver failure or death. n 2011, the FDA asked manufacturers to limit the amount of acetaminophen in prescription combination drugs to 325 mg per capsule...
  • GROUNDED aka EARTHING for health (Alaska) Movie

    01/16/2014 9:37:08 PM PST · by restornu · 16 replies
    KOSCHEL ^ | Published on Oct 30, 2013 | Steve Koschel
    GROUNDED "It was good for the skin to touch the bare Earth, and the old people liked to remove their moccasins and walk with their bare feet on the sacred Earth. The soil was soothing, strengthening, cleansing and healing" ~Luther Standing Bear~ Sioux Tribal Leader 1868-1939 From a world older and more complete, a nomadic arctic animal, the wolverine, and all such creatures, help a man on a lifelong quest in a journey to explore life's profound mysteries. From ancient times, nature revealed an interconnected life force to humans, in the form of rhythms and patterns. This is a...
  • Michelle Obama on her 50th birthday: My message to women is be healthy

    01/15/2014 10:25:10 AM PST · by Zakeet · 46 replies
    McClatchy ^ | January 15, 2014 | Lesley Clark
    <p>First Lady Michelle Obama said she's yet to peak -- even as she celebrates her 50th birthday at the White House this week.</p> <p>"I'm first lady of the United States of America -- that's pretty high up," Obama said in a birthday-themed interview with People magazine. "But I've always felt like my life is ever-evolving."</p>
  • Feds: State health exchange enrollment nearly 500k (California)

    01/14/2014 12:35:03 PM PST · by Nachum · 5 replies
    uts san diego ^ | 1/14/14 | Paul Sisson
    Nearly a half million Californians enrolled in Obamacare health plans through the end of December, according to data released Monday. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said 498,794 Californians picked health exchange plans, which gives the state 23 percent of the nearly 2.1 million enrollments nationwide. Considering the state has about 12 percent of the nation’s population, California has been more effective than other states in enrolling residents. The state has nearly met the lower threshold of predictions that call for 500,000 to 700,000 Californians to buy policies by March 31. “There is a feeling of optimism here...
  • Single-Payer Is Not Dead

    01/14/2014 10:11:01 AM PST · by SoFloFreeper · 16 replies
    Rasmussen ^ | 1/14/14 | Froma Harrop
    The prospects for single-payer health care -- adored by many liberals, despised by private health insurers and looking better all the time to others -- did not die in the Affordable Care Act. It was thrown a lifeline through a little-known provision tucked in the famously long legislation. Single-payer groups in several states are now lining up to make use of Section 1332. Vermont is way ahead of the pack, but Hawaii, Oregon, New York, Washington, California, Colorado and Maryland have strong single-payer movements. First, some definitions. Single-payer is a system where the government pays all medical bills. Canada has...
  • Drinking Alcohol Doesn't Actually Kill Brain Cells

    01/11/2014 8:10:32 AM PST · by Innovative · 17 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | Jan 10, 2014 | Daven Hiskey
    This was proven by a study by Grethe Jensen and co. (1993), who meticulously counted neurons in matched samples of non-alcoholics and alcoholics. What they found was that there was no real difference in the density or overall number of neurons between the two groups. In every group, those who drank moderately on a regular basis throughout their lives always had a diminished chance of becoming mentally impaired in their old age compared to those who didn't drink at all or almost never drank. Now for the negative (there's a lot when it comes to intemperate alcohol consumption, so I'll...
  • 13,000 OBAMACARE APPLICANTS HAVE NO RECORDS WITH HEALTH INSURERS

    01/10/2014 12:21:53 PM PST · by Jim Robinson · 12 replies
    Breitbart ^ | January 10, 2014 | By TOM MURPHY and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
    Record-keeping snags could complicate the start of insurance coverage this month as people begin using policies they purchased under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. Insurance companies are still trying to sort out cases of so-called health insurance orphans, customers for whom the government has a record that they enrolled, but the insurer does not. Government officials say the problem is real but under control, with orphan records being among the roughly 13,000 problem cases they are trying to resolve with insurers. But insurance companies are worried the process will grow more cumbersome as they deal with the flood of...
  • Hard Times and Headaches

    01/09/2014 6:35:55 AM PST · by Biggirl · 6 replies
    The New York Times ^ | January 8, 2014 | Nicholas Bakalar
    Did the recent recession make people feel physically ill? A study of Google queries suggests it did. Researchers counted queries for health terms — abdominal pain, headaches, shoulder pain, migraine and hundreds of others. Then they tracked how the numbers of searches for those terms changed during the recession — December 2008 through December 2011 — from levels before the recession began. The study was published in the February issue of The American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
  • Medicine Jim, but not as we know it: Star Trek-style tricorder that scans for signs of disease

    01/09/2014 2:26:57 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | January 8, 2014 | Victoria Woollaston
    Imagine a world where a handheld gadget scans your body and diagnoses illnesses in seconds - reducing hospital visits and potentially saving your life. It may sound like the work of science fiction but engineers in California have taken their lead from the Star Trek franchise and developed a real-life version of the show’s medical tricorder. The Scanadu Scout can read a person’s temperature, heart rate, blood oxygen levels, and more, simply being held against their forehead. It was developed by Scanadu’s CEO Walter De Brouwer, 56, at Nasa’s Ames Research Centre in California. A prototype of the Scout was...
  • USDA: On second thought, some of those school-lunch restrictions weren’t such a good idea

    01/06/2014 9:05:23 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 42 replies
    Hot Air ^ | January 4, 2014 | Erika Johnsen
    After the federal government’s school-lunch standards were overhauled in 2012 in what I’m sure was a very well-intentioned effort to institute healthier habits in America’s children and help stave off of the country’s growing childhood obesity problem, it didn’t take long for the calorie-intake and portion restrictions in the new code to crash and burn spectacularly. Healthy eating habits being the highly individualized needs and preferences that they are, kids and parents quickly began complaining that students were not able to get enough to eat at lunchtime, and in some districts, school-lunch participation began to drop as more and more...
  • Portion control -- how the government plans to dictate what's on your dinner table in 2014

    01/04/2014 7:49:28 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 36 replies
    FOX News ^ | January 3, 2014 | Baylen Linnekin
    Would you rather sip on unpasteurized milk or a cold glass of soda? Do you prefer Saturday lunch at a fast food joint or a farmers market? Regardless of your choices, your food freedom -- your right to grow, raise, produce, buy, sell, share, cook, eat, and drink the foods you want -- is under attack. Here are ten food freedom issues to keep an eye on in 2014. 1: FDA May Ban or Restrict a Growing Number of Food Ingredients. The FDA has proposed banning oils containing trans fats, an ingredient found in foods like coffee creamers and muffins....
  • Study in India: oral contraceptives dramatically increase risk of breast cancer (by 950%)

    01/03/2014 3:57:17 AM PST · by NYer · 15 replies
    The Deacon's Bench ^ | January 2, 2014 | Deacon Greg Kandra
    From The Times of India: Women who take oral contraceptives regularly are at a higher risk of developing breast cancer compared to others, shows a study by AIIMS doctors. Breast cancer risk was found to be 9.5 times more in women with a history of consuming such pills. Early menstruation cycle, late marriage and lower duration of breastfeeding were the other major factors responsible for the disease amongIndians, according to the study published in the latest issue of the Indian Journal of Cancer.The study was conducted on 640 women, of which 320 were breast cancer patients.“We found long-term use of...
  • Hospital won't aid transfer of girl on ventilator

    01/02/2014 1:08:18 PM PST · by Anton.Rutter · 226 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | Dec. 31, 2013 | Lisa Leff & Terry Collins (AP)
    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A California hospital is unwilling to allow an outside doctor to fit a 13-year-old declared brain dead after tonsil surgery with the breathing and feeding tubes that would allow her to be safely transferred to another facility, its lawyer said Tuesday. Children's Hospital Oakland will not permit the procedures to be performed on its premises because Jahi McMath is legally dead in the view of doctors who have examined her, lawyer Douglas Straus wrote in a letter to the girl's family. "Performing medical procedures on the body of a deceased human being is simply not something...
  • Social workers take children from families who overfeed them

    01/02/2014 9:36:07 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 14 replies
    The Express ^ | December 29, 2013 | Matthew Davis
    One child had a BMI measurement of 35, which for a six-foot man would mean weighing 19st. Britain's obesity epidemic, which sees NHS hospitals dealing with 1,000 cases every day, is a reversal of the traditional problem when children were undernourished. Increasingly social workers find youngsters being fed a high-fat, sugary diet, which can be just as bad for their health. The phenomenon is known as "killing with kindness" because the child craves the unhealthy food and a loving parent feels unable to say no. Professionals say they have to make complex decisions in care proceedings and a family's gross...
  • Alzheimer's study: Vitamin E may slow decline in mild, moderate dementia

    12/31/2013 8:36:51 PM PST · by Innovative · 9 replies
    CTV News/AP ^ | Dec 31, 2013 | Marilynn Marchione
    Researchers say vitamin E might slow the progression of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease -- the first time any treatment has been shown to alter the course of dementia at that stage. In a study of more than 600 older veterans, high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living skills, such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation, by about six months over a two-year period. Vitamin E did not preserve thinking abilities, though, and it did no good for patients who took it with another Alzheimer's medication. But those taking vitamin E alone required less help...
  • Bones repaired with stroke of a pen

    12/27/2013 5:17:05 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The Australian ^ | December 28, 2013 | Murad Ahmed
    SURGEONS may soon be able to "draw" new bone, skin and muscle on to patients after scientists created a pen-like device that can apply human cells directly to car-crash victims and others with serious injuries. Australian scientists have made a "BioPen", which allows doctors to apply stem cells and growth factors on to damaged and diseased bones. The machine works in a similar way to a 3D printer, building up the materials required to heal a bone. Experts have said it could improve bone reconstruction surgery. The device was created at the University of Wollongong and St Vincent's Hospital in...
  • The Art of the Escape

    12/26/2013 10:07:34 PM PST · by QT3.14 · 1 replies
    NRO ^ | December 26, 2013 | Rich Lowry
    - Obama keeps fleeing the consequences of his own signature legislation - In the great tradition of American civil disobedience, President Barack Obama is defying a law. It’s just one that he himself lobbied for, signed, and lost a house of Congress over. Even Henry David Thoreau would be hard-pressed to understand this one. The famous dissenter refused to pay a tax because of his opposition to the Mexican-American War and slavery; presumably, though, he would have been willing to comply with the provisions of something called ThoreauCare.
  • The Negative Health Effects of Homosexuality (Classic for Your Files)

    12/26/2013 5:28:16 AM PST · by xzins · 72 replies
    Family Research Council ^ | Timothy J. Dailey, Ph. D.
    The Negative Health Effects of Homosexuality By Timothy J. Dailey, Ph. D. Senior Fellow, Center for Marriage and Family Studies Homosexual activists attempt to portray their lifestyle as normal and healthy, and insist that homosexual relationships are the equivalent in every way to their heterosexual counterparts. Hollywood and the media relentlessly propagate the image of the fit, healthy, and well-adjusted homosexual. The reality is quite opposite to this caricature which was recently conceded by the homosexual newspaper New York Blade News: Reports at a national conference about sexually transmitted diseases indicate that gay men are in the highest risk group...
  • How Tony Gonzalez Inadvertently Saved A Photographer's Life By Crashing Into Him

    12/22/2013 4:47:24 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 26 replies
    ThePostGame ^ | Thursday, December 19, 2013
    Monday night will be an emotional one for the San Francisco 49ers and their fans, as the team's matchup with the Atlanta Falcons will be the last regular-season game at Candlestick Park. For Tony Gonzalez, who will be on hand with the visiting Atlanta Falcons, it will also mark his final visit to the site where he experienced what he calls the "strangest thing that ever happened to him." On a conference call with Bay Area reporters, Gonzalez recalled how during a game between his then-team, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 49ers at Candlestick Park he was pushed out...
  • Reid hospitalized as 'precaution' after feeling ill Friday

    12/20/2013 6:26:37 AM PST · by Zakeet · 98 replies
    NBC News ^ | December 20, 2013 | Carrie Dann
    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was hospitalized early Friday morning as a “precaution” after feeling ill, a spokesman said, adding that doctors concluded "everything is normal" after testing. “Early this morning, Senator Reid was not feeling well and as a precaution decided to go to the hospital. Tests have been conducted and everything is normal. He is alert, resting and feeling better,” spokesman Adam Jentleson said in a statement. "Doctors have asked that he remain in the hospital for observation so he will not be working today."
  • Most chicken sold in stores is contaminated, Consumer Reports says

    12/19/2013 12:04:43 PM PST · by chessplayer · 151 replies
    A report released Thursday indicates that just about all chicken sold in U.S. stores contains harmful bacteria, and nearly half are tainted with a so-called superbug that's resistant to antibiotics. The Consumer Reports study, its most comprehensive to date on poultry, tested raw chicken breasts purchased at retail outlets nationwide for six bacteria, then checked for antibiotic resistance. The results showed nearly half of the samples were contaminated with at least one bacterium resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics, what's known as a superbug. Slightly more than 10 percent were tainted with two superbugs. That finding is cause...
  • Mystery illness claims 4 lives in Montgomery County (Texas)

    12/18/2013 6:45:25 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 117 replies
    KHOU 11 News Houston ^ | December 17, 2013 at 11:09 AM | DREW KAREDES
    According to the health department, all of the patients have had flu-like and/or pneumonia like symptoms. However, all of them have tested negative for the flu. There have been eight confirmed patients ranging in age from 41 to 68. Four of those patients have died.
  • Doctors Save Severed Hand By Sewing to Man's Ankle

    12/16/2013 10:14:42 AM PST · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    http://www.breitbart.com ^ | 16 Dec 2013, 7:17 AM PDT | by Jon David Kahn
    After a man lost his right hand in a work place accident in November, doctors in Changsha, Hunan province successfully reattached the limb by grafting it to his ankle for a month. The man, Xiao Wei, said that at the time of the accident he "was just shocked and frozen to the spot, until colleagues unplugged the machine and retrieved my hand and took me to the hospital. I am still young, and I couldn't imagine life without a right hand." Doctors, opted to graft the hand to Wei's ankle to prevent it from dying while they worked on his...
  • Protest Planned Against Last-Minute Bloomberg Push for Mandatory Flu Vaccines

    12/10/2013 12:05:48 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 29 replies
    Politicker.com ^ | December 9, 2013 | Colin Campbell and Jill Colvin
    Autism advocates are set to protest tomorrow against a quiet effort by Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration to require annual flu vaccinations for all New York City schoolchildren.On Wednesday, with just three weeks to go until he leaves office, Mr. Bloomberg’s controversial Board of Health is set to vote on new rules that would force children as young as six months old to be immunized each year before December 31 if they attend licensed day care or pre-school programs.“Young children have a high risk of developing severe complications from influenza. One-third of children under five in New York City do not...
  • Problems continue to plague Mass. health marketplace (Zero sign ups)

    12/08/2013 3:57:18 PM PST · by Libloather · 14 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 12/07/13 | Chelsea Conaboy
    With three weeks left in the year, not one of the thousands of Massachusetts residents who need to enroll in new health insurance plans by Jan. 1 has been able to do so through the state insurance marketplace that was revamped to comply with the national Affordable Care Act. About 126,000 people enrolled in health plans subsidized by the state have until March to choose a new plan and can keep their current coverage until then. But thousands of others are depending on a new plan to start on the first of the year, and some worry that their coverage...
  • 6 Ways a Poor Night's Sleep Messes with You

    12/07/2013 5:42:41 PM PST · by Kenny · 20 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | December 6, 2013 | Ross Pomeroy
    We all know how we feel when sleep-deprived: tired, groggy, and grumpy. But have you ever considered all of the ways just a single poor night of sleep may be messing with you? Science has revealed a great many ramifications that you've probably never thought of. 1. You're more depressed and anxious. In 2008, researchers assessed 226 individuals who had six or more hours of sleep the previous night and 112 individuals who had less. The "poor sleep" group scored significantly higher in levels of stress, depression, and anxiety compared to those that slept longer.2. You pee more the next...
  • The Power of a Daily Bout of Exercise

    12/06/2013 12:17:51 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 18 replies
    New York Times ^ | NOVEMBER 27, 2013 | GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
    This week marks the start of the annual eat-too-much and move-too-little holiday season, with its attendant declining health and surging regrets. But a well-timed new study suggests that a daily bout of exercise should erase or lessen many of the injurious effects, even if you otherwise lounge all day on the couch and load up on pie. To undertake this valuable experiment, which was published online in The Journal of Physiology, scientists at the University of Bath in England rounded up a group of 26 healthy young men. All exercised regularly. None were obese. Baseline health assessments, including biopsies of...
  • Why a Brisk Walk Is Better

    12/06/2013 12:12:09 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    New York Times ^ | GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
    Walking, fast or slow, is wonderful exercise. But now a first-of-its-kind study shows that to get the most health benefits from walking, many of us need to pick up the pace. The findings stem from a new analysis of the National Walkers’ Health Study, a large database of information maintained at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory about thousands of middle-age men and women who walk regularly for exercise. Recruited beginning in 1998 at walking events and from lists of subscribers to walking-related publications, these volunteers filled out a lengthy survey about their typical walking distance and pace, as well as...
  • Neuroscience may offer hope to millions robbed of silence by tinnitus

    12/05/2013 9:06:59 AM PST · by Red Badger · 97 replies
    PBS ^ | Updated: Nov. 6, 2013, 11:28 a.m. ET | BY JENNY MARDER
    Chronic tinnitus affects millions of Americans, and is the most widely reported disability among veterans. New research reveals the roots of the disease lie deep within the brain, and experimental therapies are providing hope for a cure. n Easter Sunday in 2008, the phantom noises in Robert De Mong’s head dropped in volume -- for about 15 minutes. For the first time in months, he experienced relief, enough at least to remember what silence was like. And then they returned, fierce as ever. It was six months earlier that the 66-year-old electrical engineer first awoke to a dissonant clamor in...
  • Man removed from flight in Phoenix over infectious disease alert

    12/02/2013 4:10:59 PM PST · by bgill · 45 replies
    Reuters/Yahoo ^ | Dec. 2, 2013 | Reuters
    Officials removed a man with an unspecified infectious disease - possibly tuberculosis - from a US Airways Express flight with 70 passengers on board shortly after it landed in Phoenix over the weekend, authorities said on Monday. The unidentified man was removed from Flight 2846 from Austin, Texas, when it landed on Saturday after the airline received an alert from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding a passenger known to have an infectious disease, a spokesman for the airline said.
  • City Council seeks ban on e-cigarettes in public places as high-tech successor to smoking ban

    11/30/2013 8:33:59 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 40 replies
    The New York Daily News ^ | November 27, 2013 | Annie Karni
    First the city banned smoking in most public places. Now it’s moving to snuff out the use of smokeless electronic cigarettes as well. The City Council announced Wednesday that it will hold a hearing Wednesday on a bill prohibiting the use of the battery-operated, tobacco-free vaporizers in restaurants, offices, parks, beaches and other places where smoking regular cigarettes is not allowed.
  • LSUHSC research finds combo of plant nutrients kills breast cancer cells

    11/30/2013 2:55:57 PM PST · by xzins · 56 replies
    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center ^ | 22-Nov-2013 | Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
    Contact: Leslie Capo lcapo@lsuhsc.edu 504-568-4806 Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center LSUHSC research finds combo of plant nutrients kills breast cancer cells New Orleans, LA – A study led by Madhwa Raj, PhD, Research Professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and its Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has found that a super cocktail of six natural compounds in vegetables, fruits, spices and plant roots killed 100% of sample breast cancer cells without toxic side effects on normal cells. The results, which also revealed potential treatment target genes, are published in the November 2013 issue...
  • President Obama has NINE different types of pie for White House Thanksgiving dinner-

    11/28/2013 3:35:26 PM PST · by Nachum · 93 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11/28/13 | Staff
    His wife may be behind the nation´s biggest healthy-eating campaign, but even the president is allowed one day off a year. President Barack Obama is celebrating Thanksgiving with a quiet family dinner at the White House - where he will be feasting on a choice of nine pies. The first family will have a choice of huckleberry pie, pecan pie, chocolate cream pie, sweet potato pie, peach pie, apple pie, pumpkin pie, banana cream pie or coconut cream pie, The Hill reported. The selection offers three more pies than last year. Savory dishes on the menu include turkey, honey-baked ham,...
  • 10 Reasons Green Tea Is The Healthiest Drink In The World

    11/28/2013 11:57:10 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/28/2013 | KRIS GUNNARS, AUTHORITY NUTRITION
    Green tea is the healthiest beverage on the planet. It is loaded with antioxidants and nutrients that have powerful effects on the body. This includes improved brain function, fat loss, a lower risk of cancer and many other incredible benefits. Here are 10 health benefits of green tea that have been confirmed in human research studies. 1. Green Tea Contains Various Bioactive Compounds That Can Improve Health Green tea is more than just green liquid. Many of the bioactive compounds in the tea leaves do make it into the final drink, which contains large amounts of important nutrients. It is...
  • The Obamacare success stories you haven't been hearing about [partial vanity]

    11/26/2013 5:44:22 PM PST · by upchuck · 19 replies
    LAT ^ | Nov 25, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
    This article was published in the LA Times. It details the stories of folks receiving nobamacare benefits. Short segments from the stories are excerpted below: Two-thirds of the 30 million Americans who will be eligible for individual coverage next year are uninsured today, whether because they can't afford it now or because they're barred by pre-existing condition limitations, which will no longer be legal. And more than three-quarters will be eligible for subsidies that will cut their premium costs and even co-pays and deductibles substantially.... Next year they'll pay $650 a month, after the government subsidy, for a plan through...
  • Michelle Obama in 2008: Barack Will Make Us 'Sacrifice' for Health Care

    11/26/2013 11:58:08 AM PST · by Nachum · 32 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 11/26/13 | Joel B. Pollak
    A video has surfaced from the presidential campaign trail in May 2008 that shows Michelle Obama talking about the sacrifices that Americans would have to make in order to achieve her husband's health care goals. The future First Lady was speaking at a meeting of military families to highlight the cost of war for those back at home. Her remarks have been referred to in several Internet postings but no video has surfaced until now. Mrs. Obama says: It's going to cost us something as a society to say, 'We can't tolerate millions of people uninsured. We can't tolerate it.'...
  • Half Of New Greek HIV Cases Are Self-Inflicted To Receive €700 Per Month Benefits, Study Finds

    11/25/2013 12:18:15 PM PST · by markomalley · 20 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 11/25/2013 | Tyler Durden
    When one reads the following stunning, and tragic, excerpt from the World Health Organization's recent report "Review of social determinants and the health divide in the WHO European Region: final report" what can one say but... Grecovery.From the WHO: Case study: countries’ experiences of financial crisis - Greece Suicides rose by 17% between 2007 and 2009 and to 25% in 2010, according to unofficial 2010 data (398). The Minister of Health reported a further 40% rise in the first half of 2011 compared with the same period in 2010. Suicide attempts have also increased, particularly among people reporting economic distress (610)....
  • Scientists find brain region that helps you make up your mind

    11/25/2013 7:56:15 AM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    http://medicalxpress.com ^ | 11-24-2013 | Provided by University of British Columbia
    One of the smallest parts of the brain is getting a second look after new research suggests it plays a crucial role in decision making. A University of British Columbia study published today in Nature Neuroscience says the lateral habenula, a region of the brain linked to depression and avoidance behaviors, has been largely misunderstood and may be integral in cost-benefit decisions. "These findings clarify the brain processes involved in the important decisions that we make on a daily basis, from choosing between job offers to deciding which house or car to buy," says Prof. Stan Floresco of UBC's Dept....
  • Steroid injections for premature babies linked to mental health risk

    11/24/2013 9:26:06 AM PST · by James C. Bennett
    Imperial College, London ^ | Imperial College
    Steroid injections given to pregnant women before premature birth may increase the child's risk of later behavioural difficulties, a study has found. Mothers who are expected to give birth prematurely are often given an infusion of glucocorticoids, which mimic the natural hormone cortisol. This treatment is vital for helping the baby’s lungs mature, but the new research suggests it may also increase the risk of mental health problems including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is the most common behavioural disorder in young people in the UK. The study, by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oulu, Finland, is...
  • Need Freeper Analysis of Longevity Rates in Developed Nations

    11/24/2013 7:05:36 AM PST · by LS · 28 replies
    self | 11/24/2013 | LS
    Yesterday I heard a quack health foods doc on the radio repeat something we hear a great deal, only he claimed to have a source for it, namely that the U.S. is down the list in life expectancy among developed nations. Supposedly this was a study from the Journal of the American Medical Association. I have some ideas as to why this may be (if indeed true) but I'd like some Freepers involved in medicine/insurance or other health-related fields to weigh in. What would account for the US having shorter life spans than, say, places such as Denmark or France?
  • Oregon Farmers May Go to Prison for Raw Milk Ads

    11/22/2013 9:11:54 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 16 replies
    Freedom Outpost ^ | November 22, 2013 | Joshua Cook
    There is no free speech when it comes to advertising raw milk products in Oregon. In fact, those who violate this law may face possible jail time. Most states in the country have significant restrictions on the sale of raw milk, and at first glance, Oregon's seem like some of the less extreme ones.  Sales are outright illegal in 20 states, and though Oregon does not allow the retail sale of raw milk, it does allow small organic dairies – with three cows or fewer, only two of which can be lactating at any given time – to sell their product...