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Keyword: classics

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  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics? Reason 9: THE HUMAN CONDITION

    05/20/2020 2:45:45 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 5 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2014 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #9: HUMAN CONDITION When it comes to the human condition, we may think that Scripture is all we need. After all, Scripture does show us our true human condition in a way that the Greeks did not and could not: our relationship to God, that we are sinners, that we are a fallen race in need of redemption, that sin separates us from God, that God loves us and offers us grace and salvation. This is the good news that has been revealed by God in Scripture and in the person of Jesus Christ and nowhere else. Indeed, the...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics Reason 7: RELIGION

    05/15/2020 3:08:48 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 3 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Dec 2013 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #7: RELIGION Saint Augustine in his Confessions tells us that after many years of wandering in the desert of indecision, it was Cicero who led him to Christ. Cicero’s Hortensius set him on the path to Christian conversion by implanting in him a longing for the immortality of wisdom. The text of Hortensius did not make it to the modern world and thus is probably the most famous lost treatise in world literature. Wouldn’t we all love to read this work that St. Augustine praises so highly? Well, I have read a lot of Cicero and, like most writers,...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics Reason 6: GOVERNMENT

    05/14/2020 2:06:08 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 3 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Aug 2013 | Cheryl Lowe
    American government and political science will come alive when you read the Greeks and Romans, the same way that words come alive when you study Latin and Greek. There were many influences on the Founding Fathers, and certainly the modern philosophers—Locke and Hume—were important along with the tradition of English liberty. But separation of powers, mixed government, and checks and balances are the principles that first come to my mind when I think of the genius of the American political system; and where did these concepts come from? Plato in the Republic describes five types of government and says they...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics - Reason 5: NATURAL LAW

    05/13/2020 2:31:18 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 6 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #5: NATURAL LAW What did the first Continental Congress mean when it appealed to “the immutable laws of nature,” or Thomas Jefferson when he referred to the “Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God and the unalienable rights of man”? Natural law. The principle of natural law is embedded in Western civilization, the Declaration of Independence, and our whole history as a nation. The concept of natural law was first articulated by Aristotle in Rhetoric, where Aristotle notes that, aside from the “particular” laws that each people has set up for itself, there is a “common” law that is...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics? – Reason 4: EDUCATION

    05/11/2020 2:04:05 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 7 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON 4: EDUCATION A classical education focuses on the study of the classical languages, Latin and Greek, and on the study of the classical civilization of Greece and Rome. But why is the word classical reserved only for the languages of the Greeks and Romans and only for their civilization? What really is so special about the Greeks and Romans and why should Christians study them? After all they were not Christians, they were pagans. Some have objected to the word pagan and misunderstood its meaning. Pagan is a word Christians coined in the later Roman Empire to refer to...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics Reason #3: Science

    05/08/2020 2:21:35 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 15 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #3: SCIENCE Because we live in the aftermath of what has been called the “scientific revolution,” we modern people consider ourselves quite superior to the ancients in regard to the study of the natural world. We are polished practitioners of what C.S. Lewis called “chronological snobbery.” We think ancient people were ignorant of the natural world and that we, with all our advanced scientitic knowledge, have little to learn from them. But one of the problems with having your nose so high in the air is that you can miss the thing right in front of you. Science, as...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics Reason #2: Virtue

    05/07/2020 1:49:56 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 33 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #2: VIRTUE In the last article, we learned that the Greeks established the first principles of architecture by studying nature. The proportions that are most pleasing to the human eye are those of nature’s greatest work of art—the human body. We learned that God gave man reason and the desire to know, but he did not leave us without guides. He gave us the Greeks, the world’s first systematic, abstract thinkers. And so we study and honor the Greeks because they teach us how to use reason to explore and understand our world, a world that is material and...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics Reason #1: Architecture

    05/06/2020 2:53:05 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 13 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #1: ARCHITECTURE Of all of the points that I will make, this is the easiest to understand because it is so visible: we see its evidence every day. The power and beauty of classical architecture is everywhere, from grand buildings like our Supreme Court to our humble everyday homes. The Greeks discovered the proportions that are most pleasing to the human eye which, they tell us, are based on nature’s greatest work of art: the human body. Scale, mass, proportion, and symmetry—the principles of classical architecture—were worked out by the Greeks in great detail and built upon in succeeding...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics: Introduction

    05/05/2020 1:27:02 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 31 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | June 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    The power of the word classic cannot be underestimated, communicating as it does the idea of excellence, truth, order, discipline, and beauty. The word “classic” brings to mind something that has withstood the test of time, and by virtue of this fact, participates in some way in the timeless and the eternal. And what is the only thing we know of with these attributes but God and His Eternal Word? When looked at this way, every Christian should want a classical education for their children: It has everything we instinctively want. But when we examine this word “classic,” we find...
  • 1996 Flashback: Comeback Is Complete: Yanks Win the Series

    04/17/2020 9:09:26 PM PDT · by GuavaCheesePuff · 6 replies
    The New York Times ^ | October 27, 1996 | N. R. Kleinfield
    Ending years of futility and self-doubt, the Yankees defeated the Atlanta Braves 3-2 in a taut thriller last night to win their first World Series title in 18 years. Crowning a magical season of many small miracles, the Yankees dropped the first two games at home and then stormed back to snatch four straight from the defending champions and claim a destiny that once seemed their very birthright. The spellbinding six-game triumph over the Braves bestowed on the Yankees their 23d world championship, by far the most of any team, and perhaps their sweetest. Never since the Yankees began winning...
  • Great Literature

    02/17/2020 7:52:44 PM PST · by Fester Chugabrew · 53 replies
    FaceBook ^ | February 16, 2020 | Tony Esolen
    Not that anybody is wondering, but if you asked me what books have been of the greatest influence on how and what I think, aside from the BIBLE, and the plays of Shakespeare, I'd answer: Homer, Odyssey Plato, Phaedrus Plato, Symposium Virgil, Aeneid Augustine, Confessions Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy Anonymous, The Quest of the Holy Grail Dante, The Divine Comedy Spenser, The Faerie Queene Herbert, The Temple Pascal, Pensees Milton, Paradise Lost Fielding, Tom Jones Boswell, Life of Johnson Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France Manzoni, The Betrothed Dickens, Bleak House Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov Marcel, Man Against...
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Greek Classics

    11/27/2019 5:15:47 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 4 replies
    The National Herald ^ | Jan 25, 2008 | Alex Mallias
    This year will mark the 40th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. His death on April 4, 1968, found my country in the midst of one of its darkest hours, as the one year anniversary of an oppressive military dictatorship neared. With my fellow citizens living under military rule and deprived of the very basic freedoms, I was inspired by the people of Birmingham, Ala., of Memphis and Atlanta, who, in a most dignified way, poured into the streets, standing up for what was rightly theirs. Across the Atlantic, the civil-rights movement reached us in the clarion...
  • Classics for the people

    11/16/2019 11:10:59 AM PST · by thecodont · 16 replies
    Aeon.co ^ | 13 November, 2019 | Edith Hall
    The hero of Thomas Hardy’s tragic novel Jude the Obscure (1895) is a poor stonemason living in a Victorian village who is desperate to study Latin and Greek at university. He gazes, from the top of a ladder leaning against a rural barn, on the spires of the University of Christminster (a fictional substitute for Oxford). The spires, vanes and domes ‘like the topaz gleamed’ in the distance. The lustrous topaz shares its golden colour with the stone used to build Oxbridge colleges, but it is also one of the hardest minerals in nature. Jude’s fragile psyche and health inevitably...
  • Christianity and the 19th Century Russian Novel

    03/26/2019 6:08:06 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 8 replies
    Thinking Faith ^ | 19th Nov 2010 | Dairmid Gunn
    The 1840s saw the beginning of a rift between two general movements in educated society – the Westerners and the Slavophiles. The former imbibed the philosophy of Hegel and Marx and saw in this a blueprint for the creation of a perfect state or Utopia. For them The Emancipation of the serfs in 1861 was not enough to satisfy their craving for secular reform. The group in society who agitated for change were called the intelligentsia and among its members were people of modest rank recruited for government service during the reign of Nicholas I. The Slavophiles clung to traditional...
  • How I was Kicked Out of the Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting

    03/02/2019 6:44:17 AM PST · by Ge0ffrey · 79 replies
    Quillette ^ | February 26, 2019 | Mary Frances Williams
    I only wanted to make four very brief points, but I felt compelled to state at the beginning that we could not abandon the ancient languages because then we would have nothing left of our field—of all the egregiously shocking things I had just heard, that seemed to be the one that most cried out to be challenged. I then attempted to say the following: 1) It is important to stand up for Classics as a discipline, and promote it as the political, literary, historical, philosophical, rhetorical, and artistic foundation of Western Civilization, and the basis of European history, tradition,...
  • The Most Contrarian College in America

    09/11/2018 7:24:31 PM PDT · by proxy_user · 40 replies
    The New York Times ^ | Sept 11, 2018 | Frank Bruni
    SANTA FE, N.M. — Have I got a college for you. For your first two years, your regimen includes ancient Greek. And I do mean Greek, the language, not Greece, the civilization, though you’ll also hang with Aristotle, Aeschylus, Thucydides and the rest of the gang. There’s no choice in the matter. There’s little choice, period. Let your collegiate peers elsewhere design their own majors and frolic with Kerouac. For you it’s Kant. You have no major, only “the program,” an exploration of the Western canon that was implemented in 1937 and has barely changed. It’s intense. Learning astronomy and...
  • 'Homer can help you': War veterans use ancient epics to cope

    03/14/2018 7:26:17 AM PDT · by thecodont · 13 replies
    Associated Press via Stars and Stripes ^ | Published: March 14, 2018 | By WILSON RING
    BURLINGTON, Vt. — The trials of Odysseus are really not that different from the struggles of those learning to readjust after wars of today, modern veterans are finding. A small group of military veterans has been meeting weekly in a classroom at the University of Vermont to discuss "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" for college credit — and to give meaning to their own experiences, equating the close-order discipline of men who fought with spears, swords and shields to that of men and women who do battle these days with laser-guided munitions. Homer isn't just for student veterans. Discussion groups...
  • School removes ‘Huckleberry Finn,' ‘To Kill a Mockingbird' from curriculum

    02/09/2018 6:48:24 AM PST · by rightwingintelligentsia · 58 replies
    Cox Media via WPXI ^ | February 9, 2018 | Bob D'Angelo
    DULUTH, Minn. - Students taking English classes in a Minnesota city will no longer have to read two American classics or write reports about them, the Duluth News Tribune reported. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and “To Kill a Mockingbird,” which contain racial slurs, will no longer be required reading for students in the Duluth Public School district’s English classes next fall. However, the books are not banned: They will be available in the school as optional reading for students, the News Tribune reported. The decision comes two months after a Virginia school temporarily banned the two novels after a...
  • Public Domain Classic TV

    09/13/2017 1:39:02 PM PDT · by V K Lee · 32 replies
    View full episodes online – all FREE Many classic shows have passed into the public domain and may be freely distributed. Users at Internet Archive upload videos which they attest are in the public domain. These videos, categorized here by RerunCentury, are available for instant streaming. Watch Historic Shows
  • How to Be a Good Classicist Under a Bad Emperor [Alt-Right racists into classics]

    12/17/2016 5:30:16 PM PST · by AC Beach Patrol · 28 replies
    Eidolon ^ | 11/21/2016 | Dr. Donna Zuckerberg (Fakebook founder's sister)
    A specter is haunting the Internet-- the specter of the “alt-right.” The forces of white supremacy and toxic masculinity, fueled by a sense of entitlement dwarfed only by their inflated estimation of their own intelligence, have entered into an unholy alliance to remove feminism, political correctness, and multiculturalism from America. And on November 8th, 2016, after enduring years of mockery, months of being told that the arc of the moral universe would never let it win, the Alt-Right scored its first significant political victory: the election of Donald Trump to the highest office of the most powerful country in the...