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To: apochromat
How can one be sure he's found the faintest dwarf?

Ahhh, excellent question!

In the press conference Wednesday, they described their methodology as using exposures of such long duration that had their been fainter dwarfs, they would have been detected. In other words, the minimum detectable magnitude was below that of the faintest dwarf they saw, sufficiently lower such that they feel confident that they would have seen them if there were fainter ones.

The new Hubble camera is MUCH more sensitive, and they plan to use it to look for much fainter dwarfs (to verify that what they found WAS the faintest (and thus oldest), and to look at dwarfs in a completely differnt type of cluster, and in cluster much more distant.

117 posted on 04/24/2002 9:48:13 PM PDT by longshadow
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To: longshadow
I guess they are relying on image processing algorithms. If the light from the bright dwarves is subtracted from the light of the faint dwarves, large areas of image (larger than the bright dwarves alone) would become unusable. I think it wouldn't necessarily work too well if the faintest dwarves are in the center of the cluster, and it would be less effective for a larger cluster, otherwise the larger cluster could give better results.
127 posted on 04/24/2002 10:07:52 PM PDT by apochromat
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