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Revised SAT Won’t Include Obscure Vocabulary Words
New York Times ^ | April 16, 2014 | TAMAR LEWIN

Posted on 04/16/2014 5:18:01 AM PDT by reaganaut1

The College Board on Wednesday will release many details of its revised SAT, including sample questions and explanations of the research, goals and specifications behind them.

“We are committed to a clear and open SAT, and today is the first step in that commitment,” said Cyndie Schmeiser, the College Board’s chief of assessment, in a conference call on Monday, previewing the changes to be introduced in the spring of 2016.

She said the 211-page test specifications and supporting materials being shared publicly include “everything a student needs to know to walk into that test and not be surprised.”

The overall scoring will return to the old 1600 scales, based on a top score of 800 in reading and math.A New SAT Aims to Realign With SchoolworkMARCH 5, 2014 David Coleman is focusing on ways to encourage low-income students to go to select colleges.The Story Behind the SAT OverhaulMARCH 6, 2014 One big change is in the vocabulary questions, which will no longer include obscure words. Instead, the focus will be on what the College Board calls “high utility” words that appear in many contexts, in many disciplines — often with shifting meanings — and they will be tested in context. For example, a question based on a passage about an artist who “vacated” from a tradition of landscape painting, asks whether it would be better to substitute the word “evacuated,” “departed” or “retired,” or to leave the sentence unchanged. (The right answer is “departed.”)

The test will last three hours, with another 50 minutes for an optional essay in which students will be asked to analyze a text and how the author builds an argument.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News
KEYWORDS: college; education; sat; words
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To: Always A Marine
I always thought the use of big words was to look and act superior to other people, not for the actual purpose of being smarter. Intelligence is and always be more about creativity than memorization.

Did it really matter if Einstein learned a ton of big words in school? Of course not, Einstein was himself because he invented things, not because he run circles around someone with words they couldn't understand.

51 posted on 04/16/2014 8:46:54 AM PDT by Almondjoy
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To: reaganaut1
Too late for a-chill-us.


52 posted on 04/16/2014 9:43:37 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: reaganaut1
Re: “Revised SAT Won’t Include Obscure Vocabulary Words”

Borborygmus!

(Audible sounds coming from your abdomen - they often begin the same moment you begin to take vocabulary tests)

53 posted on 04/16/2014 12:36:13 PM PDT by zeestephen
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