Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Searching for what's still made in the USA
CNN ^

Posted on 07/17/2013 9:53:21 AM PDT by ToxicMich

Josh Miller never gave much thought to where his car, bed or toothpaste came from until an aluminum plant in his hometown of Ravenswood, West Virginia, shut down about four years ago.

The closure left 650 people without a job, including Miller's father-in-law, in a town of roughly 3,800, triggering a familiar pattern. The unemployment rate in Jackson County more than doubled, businesses shuttered and Ravenswood's quaint downtown became a ghost town.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS:
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-99 next last
Link to the movie trailer : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX8db-wnir4
1 posted on 07/17/2013 9:53:21 AM PDT by ToxicMich
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

Didnt you get the message, free trade is good for the economy.


2 posted on 07/17/2013 9:55:24 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

Not all Americans are made in America any more.


3 posted on 07/17/2013 9:55:39 AM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

Welfare and gubmint employee leeches. We seem to have the biggest share of the world market on that one.


4 posted on 07/17/2013 9:56:28 AM PDT by Catmom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver

Yeah, everybody else all over the world is gonna buy our stuff! Too bad we don’t make stuff anymore.


5 posted on 07/17/2013 9:58:03 AM PDT by informavoracious (We're being "punished" with Stanley Ann's baby. Obamacare: shovel-ready healthcare.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

If I had the money I would start a chain of stores called “Made in the USA” and it would sell only items made here. Of course it is difficult to do since so many sub assemblies are made elsewhere so you woul dhave to define what is made in the USA and what is not by the percentage of parts and labor in the item. Would people be willing to pay the higher prices?


6 posted on 07/17/2013 9:58:05 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

Simply put, through the unintended consequences of most Government policies, we encourage businesses to produce off-shore.


7 posted on 07/17/2013 10:00:26 AM PDT by PGR88
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

ifyou carried high quality, essential items, maybe. if they were throwaway things and such, maybe ot.


8 posted on 07/17/2013 10:00:32 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

All of my favorite firearms are still made in America.


9 posted on 07/17/2013 10:01:46 AM PDT by SENTINEL (Kneel down to God. Stand up to tyrants. STICK TO YOUR GUNS !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich
Searching for what's still made in the USA

Marxist entitlement.

10 posted on 07/17/2013 10:01:47 AM PDT by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

Nice idea, but where would you source your stock from? All I can find that is made in USA are plastics, simple metal castings and disposable items. In short, the kind of stuff that was made in Japan sixty years ago after the war. The stuff your grandfather called “junk”.


11 posted on 07/17/2013 10:04:48 AM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Catmom
"Welfare and gubmint employee leeches. We seem to have the biggest share of the world market on that one."

We're working hard on turning us all into welfare leeches. We lowered our tariffs on imported goods and put our own people out of work. And neither political party has a clue how to fix it.

12 posted on 07/17/2013 10:06:02 AM PDT by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

One hundret pre-cent American made by the liberal enslavement cabal of government, schools, media and entertainment.

13 posted on 07/17/2013 10:09:08 AM PDT by N. Theknow (Kennedys=Can't drive, can't ski, can't fly, can't skipper a boat, but they know what's best for you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DannyTN
Best product made in the USA:

14 posted on 07/17/2013 10:09:24 AM PDT by Phillyred
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: PGR88
Let's face it. The problem is also the fact that people want to buy more and more crap. It doesn't matter if it's crap or if it's not needed, people buy it because it's there.

Since our personal financial resource are not limitless, outsourcing has become the best way to produce more crap for the same price.

Stupid en sensless consumerism lead to this. There is no pride anymore in a well thought and well made product. More is better now. Bring back pride and you will bring back the economy...

15 posted on 07/17/2013 10:10:15 AM PDT by ToxicMich ((If you are reading this, you are wasting your time. There is nothing here...))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

Handguns, rifles, and ammo.


16 posted on 07/17/2013 10:11:31 AM PDT by RoosterRedux (You can't eat Sharia)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mountainlion

including our commander and chief.


17 posted on 07/17/2013 10:20:15 AM PDT by cableguymn (The founding fathers would be shooting by now..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

I buy lots of stuff made in the USA.

‘Course, I buy most of my stuff at antique auctions.


18 posted on 07/17/2013 10:23:21 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver
free trade is good for the economy.

Yes it is. Unless you're a doomer.

Total manufacturing output in this country has more than doubled since 1975, but manufacturing employment has declined by more than 30%. Maybe the doomers should learn about productivity, and how increased productivity is the reason wages can increase faster than the rate of inflation.

Of course, it's a lot easier to be a doomer than it is to do some research.

19 posted on 07/17/2013 10:33:25 AM PDT by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

APPLE PIE!


20 posted on 07/17/2013 10:53:13 AM PDT by ncfool (Obama's aMeriKa 2012 The land of entitlement for the 51% crowd.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jboot

There used to be a garment factory or shoe factory in many small towns across the US. That would be a start.


21 posted on 07/17/2013 11:01:32 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

Walmart’s founder (Sam Walton) served in the Berlin airlift. He learned inventory control and product logistics there, and used these things when he opened his retail stores.
He was quite patriotic and tried to sell all “Made in America” merchandise for awhile. But, he had to quit. The shelves were getting emptier and emptier as more and more USA factories closed down.

Alas.


22 posted on 07/17/2013 11:03:31 AM PDT by faithhopecharity ((S)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Phillyred

Here in Pittsburgh, a local sports-talk host, in the dog days of July when the Pirates had fallen far out of contention but Steelers training camp had not yet begun...spent his entire 3 hour show interviewing the son of the man who invented the Wiffle Ball.

Was actually quite a fascinating conversation.


23 posted on 07/17/2013 11:09:50 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: faithhopecharity

Part of the problem is that Sam tied to force US companies to compete with foreign countries at foreign county prices. Instead of explaining that the extra dollar you pay for that shirt is going to go to a US worker, he wanted the US company to sell at below profit.


24 posted on 07/17/2013 11:12:28 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
You mean Sam wanted to save his customers money so they could clothe and feed their families for less, thereby having more money leftover to use for other needs like saving for retirement, paying medical bills, funding college for their children and so on?

The horror!!

25 posted on 07/17/2013 11:33:44 AM PDT by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich
I don't know if Frisbees and Hula-hoops are still made in the U.S., but I believe I owe a much-belated message of gratitude to the Wham-O Toy Company. God bless 'em. ;-)
26 posted on 07/17/2013 11:39:39 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mase

What good do low prices do you if you have no job. Like I said, he could have explained that his prices were higher because it was being used to keep Americans working.


27 posted on 07/17/2013 11:42:06 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Catmom

“Welfare and gubmint employee leeches. We seem to have the biggest share of the world market on that one.”

May I suggest lawyers, lawsuits, and prisons - America is in a league of its own.


28 posted on 07/17/2013 11:49:39 AM PDT by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
So, you like higher prices rather than lower prices? Most Americans disagree with you, and the fact that more than 140 million Americans shop at Wal-Mart every week supports that opinion.

Low prices are probably most important to people who are trying to live on savings or unemployment benefits while they find work. Even so, most Americans have jobs and they like Wal-Mart because shopping there saves them money, so they can get more bang for their buck. I don't know why some people have a problem with that. I suspect Sam would never have been caught telling his customers they had to pay higher prices to support some union or a company that couldn't compete.

Maybe you could ask big government to force all Americans to pay higher prices for all goods, not just those found at Wal-Mart, so that there would be more jobs. It's our collective duty, after all.

29 posted on 07/17/2013 12:09:15 PM PDT by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Mase

Are you just dense? Yes, I would pay higher prices to keep Americans working rather than some Chinese in a foreign sweatshop.


30 posted on 07/17/2013 12:14:32 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

The customers patronize Walmart mostly because it offers low prices. Whenever Walmart has tried moving to higher price points the customers start shopping elsewhere.


31 posted on 07/17/2013 12:21:02 PM PDT by faithhopecharity ((S)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
There were three shoe factories and four garment factories in my small hometown. All the shoe factories are long gone (the names I recall are Kessler and Mother Goose...can't think of the third one). Three of the four garment makers are still there, but only one actually makes anything (boutique high dollar suits and shirtings). The other two are now merely distributers of "quality" Chinese clothing.

I've talked to several well-connected folks at the remaining clothing factories to see what stands between them and reverting to US production. They all say the same thing: at the current price point and volume of mass-market clothing they could not afford to pay a US workforce, even with extensive automation. Moreover, the work force a the boutique plant is all Latino (read illegal), so they are really not on the same playing field. It is really frustrating. Unless you sell a product that you can make quickly in high volume with a small work force and can sell for many times what it costs to make it, you can't make it in the USA.

32 posted on 07/17/2013 12:25:37 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: jboot

I talked to a guy years ago who was a buyer of men’s clothing for Sears. He said that Sears bought a dress shirt for $2 and sold them for $30. I have no idea what the overhead was for the store at the mall. A lot, I’ll bet.


33 posted on 07/17/2013 12:29:05 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
You can pay higher prices then, and you’ll be very lonely. As I said, more than 140 million Americans shop at Wal-Mart every week. It appears that enthusiasm for your solution doesn’t exist. But you keep paying more anyway. The rest of us will continue to save our money so that we can buy more and save more.
34 posted on 07/17/2013 12:35:33 PM PDT by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

Made in USA and Fair Trade Certified might be the best one could do to start such a store! Perhaps a co-op with a group of small investors could be started to get such a store off the ground...a single store front with an internet mail order business to start off with.


35 posted on 07/17/2013 12:42:10 PM PDT by mdmathis6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: jboot

Really? That’s the stuff I find that’s made in China. The American made stuff I own is on the high end. I think this is one of those cognitive bias things, you find what you look for in the world. I buy quality regardless of country of origin, and find quite a bit of it is made here. If you think only crap is made here guess what kind of stuff you find made here. It’s all about what you’re looking for.


36 posted on 07/17/2013 12:43:22 PM PDT by discostu (Go do the voodoo that you do so well.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
Frankly, some of the price points are so low as to be absurd. I bought my first suit in 1984. It was a Jos. A, Banks suit, locally made. It cost me $100, which made my wallet cry "Uncle" at the time. But in 1984 it was an inexpensive suit. Better-quality suits went for twice as much, even then.

The same Jos. A. Banks now routinely advertises "any two suits in our store for $179!" So without adjusting for the considerable inflation in the interim, the Jos. A. Banks price point of 2013 is as much as 10% BELOW the price point of 1984. This isn't market forces at work. It is the result of the market being bypassed by companies employing slave labor.

37 posted on 07/17/2013 12:50:13 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: jboot

Exactly. JAB is probably making more while selling for less than they were 30 years ago. All because they shamelessly exploit slave labor in some 3rd world country.


38 posted on 07/17/2013 12:53:50 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: discostu

There are still many boutique industries in the USA manufacturing small amounts of upmarket products like firearms, timepieces and furniture. But I was referring to mass-market consumer goods that you would find in a typical store. You can find some US-made plastics like storage containers, hoses and sheet plastic products. There are still US-made metal castings to be found in the sporting goods, automotive and housewares section. But I challenge you to find ANY US-made clothing, shoes, small appliances, branded toys or electronics. You probably can’t. Those are the items that make up the bulk of sales in any store. Not many stores have a business model that rides on sheet plastics and seasonal lawn care products.


39 posted on 07/17/2013 1:00:55 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants
They employ 1/4 or less of the workforce that they did thirty years ago, too.

Those workers didn't go into the back office or the board room when they left JAB. They went into dead-end service jobs or the unemployment line.

40 posted on 07/17/2013 1:06:21 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: jboot

I found a nice set of pans at Tuesday Mornings last week. It takes me so long to enjoy that store because I check the “Made In” of everything. I, then, talk about it—LOUDLY and A L O T.


41 posted on 07/17/2013 1:10:26 PM PDT by bannie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: jboot

You have to define what “your typical store” is. The big box retailers push low cost goods, the American labor force is not conducive to low cost goods unless they require almost no man hours to make (very mass produced, highly automated). So if that’s your typical store then yes you don’t find quality American made goods there, you also don’t find quality Japanese, Chinese or German made good there either. That’s just not what they sell, they are low cost retailers, and low cost comes at a sacrifice of quality.

Now if you’re not shopping in those places, but going to just SLIGHTLY more upscale places (like even Dillards) where cost stops being a primary driver and now you’re getting higher quality goods, and you’ll find your percentage of goods made in America goes up, because now the companies have a better margin to afford higher priced American workers.

So again it’s all about what you’re looking for, and where you’re looking.


42 posted on 07/17/2013 1:12:39 PM PDT by discostu (Go do the voodoo that you do so well.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: ToxicMich

I can’t understand why anyone would buy “Made in China” (or many other countries) items which come in contact with food. I figure that Germany, Great Britain, and the USA are the best at following safety standards.


43 posted on 07/17/2013 1:13:27 PM PDT by bannie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: cuban leaf

Good point. I inherited much, and I’m hanging onto it. ;)


44 posted on 07/17/2013 1:14:26 PM PDT by bannie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: bannie
US-made pans are still around, thank God. I have a great set of Lodgeware, all made in the USA. Good stuff!

It tells you how inexpensive it is to make metal castings and extrusions, though. ;-)

45 posted on 07/17/2013 1:15:41 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants; Mase
What good are higher prices if you don't have a job?

OK, sure it sounds like a dumbass stupid thing to ask but the point is that we start with the reality that lower costs are good and higher costs are bad.  My bet is that you got no argument there, and what you're really pushing is you want the rest of us to pay higher import taxes and you're disappointed that we don't want to.

fwiw, the problem is that you've been doing a poor job of convincing us while the rest of us have seen how tax cut's help America and tax'n'spending hurts America. 

46 posted on 07/17/2013 1:20:33 PM PDT by expat_panama
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Mase
Right now, every company in the U.S. (that can see the writing on the wall) is trying to reduce its number of employees to fewer than 50, and/or cut their hours below 30 per week.

We need a new tax, that's the ticket. /s

47 posted on 07/17/2013 1:22:03 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: discostu
I'm sure that you are right. Unfortunately I don't have any upmarket retailers nearby. I generally note that the downmarket stores (Wal-Mart, Sears, etc.) sell the same imported products with different brand names. But the midmarket stores (Macy's, Crate and Barrel, etc.) ALSO sell the same imported products with different brand names. The only difference is the midmarket stores sell higher grade imports. I do not see appreciably more US products (or Japanese or Euro imports) in the midmarket stores.

So I do a lot of buying on the internet.

48 posted on 07/17/2013 1:24:52 PM PDT by jboot (It can happen here because it IS happening here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Blood of Tyrants

“If I had the money I would start a chain of stores called “Made in the USA” and it would sell only items made here”...

Brick and mortar store in here in Western NY:
http://www.madeinamericastore.com/
I’ll still pay more for USA made...I wish a national chain store would stock a good selection of USA made clothing. Online seems like it.


49 posted on 07/17/2013 1:30:02 PM PDT by Bonneville (Truth...the new hate speech)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: informavoracious
we don’t make stuff anymore.

Not sure who this 'we' is you're talking about but America's been picking up speed:

US industrial output picks up in June

Wednesday, July 17, 2013 » 05:02am

US industrial production picked up in June after flat-lining in May.US industrial production picked up in June after flat-lining in May.  It's been helped by improved manufacturing output and a jump in mining.  The Federal Reserve says production of manufacturers, mines and utilities rose 0.3 per cent in June.

That's in line with analyst expectations.

Manufacturing output rose 0.3 per cent, following a 0.2 per cent increase in May.  The factory gains are due to a 0.5 per cent rise in the production of durable goods. 

The quarterly data highlights the sector's struggles in a lacklustre economy.


50 posted on 07/17/2013 1:36:01 PM PDT by expat_panama
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-99 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson