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Film showing tonight: Rebel Without a Cause
Libya Herald ^ | May 9, 2013 | Staff

Posted on 05/09/2013 9:13:07 PM PDT by Brad from Tennessee

The 1955 American classic about teenage alienation and rebellion, Rebel Without a Cause, will be shown at Tripoli’s Art House tonight.

Starring James Dean, who died before the film was released, and directed by Nicholas Wood, the film explores teenage feelings of alienation and disillusionment with society.

Tonight’s film-screening is organised by the Arete Cinema Club. Cinemas and theatres in Libya were closed for decades and the cinema club aims to reintroduce films to the community.

Rebel Without a Cause is in English with Arabic subtitles. The screening starts at 6 pm on Thursday 9 May, with refreshments are available beforehand. The Art House is on Al-Sekka Road in Tripoli.


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To: miss marmelstein

Incidentally, the script of RWAC was written by Stewart Stern who is still alive at 91.


51 posted on 05/10/2013 8:12:01 AM PDT by Borges
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To: firebrand

It was risque in its final form as well.


52 posted on 05/10/2013 8:12:45 AM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

Not like the original uncut version. I’ll freepmail you if you like with the details. Won’t post them on a family forum.


53 posted on 05/10/2013 8:14:06 AM PDT by firebrand
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To: firebrand

How risque could it have been in the late 1940s?


54 posted on 05/10/2013 8:14:42 AM PDT by Borges
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To: firebrand

Didn’t know that. All I can think about is that red jacket!


55 posted on 05/10/2013 8:19:07 AM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: Borges

See your freepmail.


56 posted on 05/10/2013 8:20:15 AM PDT by firebrand
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To: Borges

Hollywood is not a place where excellence and quality dominates or is even the goal, I trust my judgement over theirs in judging their goods.


57 posted on 05/10/2013 8:25:21 AM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: Sivad

A more desolate place you won’t find.

Oh yes you will. Just cruise on over to Lost hills.


58 posted on 05/10/2013 8:30:48 AM PDT by csmusaret (America is more divided today , not because of the problems we face but because of Obama's solutions)
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To: ansel12

It’s generally not Hollywood figures who are the cinephiles it’s fans and film scholars.


59 posted on 05/10/2013 9:39:20 AM PDT by Borges
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To: Brad from Tennessee

Speaking for myself, I never claimed Dean was gay. RWAC is admittedly a solid, well-made film. It’s just that as the culture has become more and more self-absorbed, feminized, and even celebratory over this fact, issues like “teen angst” have worn really, really thin with me. Not saying the message of RWAC is endorsing this, but that it’s the topic that has become a visceral turn-off.


60 posted on 05/10/2013 10:40:31 AM PDT by greene66
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To: F15Eagle; Revolting cat!

Wait’ll they learn that Sal Mineo was gay and that James Dean dated Vampira.


61 posted on 05/10/2013 11:03:28 AM PDT by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: miss marmelstein; boop
I note your remarks on the film. I saw it the year it was released and I was born the same year as Dean (1931). I cannot seem to remember what the average Joe thought of it then, but I realise it may be as to who one was at the time.

Toronto, Canada was then hard scrabble for new immigrants as myself. Hardly anyone seemed to own a car, but all talked about getting one. A Hungarian refugee had remarked to me, after discussing Canada and the weather this:

California! That is our dream.

There was this youth with a huge boat of an automobile (his Dads). He had doting parents. In the wonderful climate of California he basked. He had a smashing girl friend to boot (portrayed by Natalie Wood). I could not figure it out. Only in later years did I realise that the harder things are to get, plus the struggles some have to make to get them, seem to make many people value just what they have.

Thus the film did indicate to some extent about "rebellion;" maybe human beings are not geared to be absolutely satisfied. A bit of a ramble here, but I must mention I had read Steinbeck's East of Eden and then re read it. Dean's portrayal was genius. The novel had more authenticity to it than "Rebel Without a Cause". I will always remember the portrayal of the sweet girl next door. It was Abra, acted by Julie Harris, who is still with us, though sadly not so well, I believe. She was born in 1924.

62 posted on 05/10/2013 11:03:43 AM PDT by Peter Libra
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To: miss marmelstein; Revolting cat!

James Dean and Marilyn Monroe are “icons” because they never age. They died young and left behind a strong body of work.

Hitchcock kept making movies past his prime and had a lengthy career before he truly got up to speed.

They were also “icon”ed with t-shirts and pop art paintings to truly become “iconic”.

Che is an icon and most of the public doesn’t know crap about him. Icon != worth or valued just as chart success != quality or “best of the era”. iconic


63 posted on 05/10/2013 11:07:55 AM PDT by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: Brad from Tennessee
Starring James Dean, who died before the film was released ...

Giant was released after his death ... not Rebel Without A Cause. I'm old enough to remember the movie not long after it was released. My recollection is that I saw the movie before he was killed in a automobile accident.

64 posted on 05/10/2013 11:21:11 AM PDT by BluH2o
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To: miss marmelstein

I didn’t think Dean was a bad actor, just that the “tearing me apart” scene looks overacted (sorry). I DID enjoy him in the rest of the film though. He was very cool.


65 posted on 05/10/2013 1:01:49 PM PDT by boop ("You don't look so bad, here's another")
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To: Peter Libra

Yes, Julie Harris was a genius of an actress. Great movie. I can understand an immigrant wanting California! It was the golden land after the war!


66 posted on 05/10/2013 1:07:27 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: a fool in paradise

Sal Mineo was indeed gay and working on a gay play when he was brutally murdered in his drive way in L.A. I believe they never found the killer. Vampira, at least, was a woman.


67 posted on 05/10/2013 1:12:05 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: miss marmelstein

Too many of the young actors in Rebel met untimely ends. Nick Adams is another one.


68 posted on 05/10/2013 1:16:32 PM PDT by Borges
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To: firebrand
[Libyans would surely riot.]

I wonder what their reaction would be to seeing Elvis and Mary Ann Mobley in “Harem Scarem.”

69 posted on 05/10/2013 3:29:46 PM PDT by Brad from Tennessee (A politician can't give you anything he hasn't first stolen from you.)
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To: Borges

Two longtime favorites of mine are in the cast of RWAC... Rochelle Hudson and Ann Doran.


70 posted on 05/10/2013 4:49:09 PM PDT by greene66
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To: miss marmelstein

What do you think of country music? Is it a complete travesty to ya? (duck’n & runn’n)


71 posted on 05/10/2013 4:54:01 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: Brad from Tennessee
Ah.. "Rebel without a Clue (or Brain)".
72 posted on 05/10/2013 5:05:05 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Join AAAA : Americans Against Acronym Abuse)
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To: csmusaret

You actually draw a distinction between Lost Hills and Cholame
in a world this large? Hmmm. If you find there is that much
of a geographic difference then for the sake of accuracy I will
revise my statement to reflect that the intersection of CA 41
and CA 46 near Cholame is among the most desolate areas
you can find anywhere in the Lower 48....... Fixed?


73 posted on 05/10/2013 6:59:22 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Now, why would you run away? I happen to very much like country music - but only the old stuff. Any kind of cross-over music drives me wild. When my husband and I drove across N.C. and Tennessee a few years ago, we could not find a station that played authentic country music or bluegrass. When I directed a lovely play that takes place in the South, I used country music between scenes.


74 posted on 05/11/2013 4:56:36 AM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: miss marmelstein
Well, it has coarsened over the years along with the coarsening of morals. Today you're likely to hear about the pleasures of some questionable tryst if you tune in to the country hits of Nashville (which I live next door to, by the way, now). There are some exceptions; there are still paeans to patriotism and family and hard work and nature's wholesome pleasures and God. I have begun to delve into that genre. It's probably a bit low brow for you, but you might find this interesting: Rednecks Built America
75 posted on 05/11/2013 10:22:03 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: miss marmelstein

PS this was a collaboration between me and Ronnie Houser. I wrote the words, and Ronnie Houser wrote the music and created and produced the performance. The truck picture on the You Tube, I created from a licensed image, split it in two, and used it as the cover art for a privately released album of the same name as the song.


76 posted on 05/11/2013 10:29:23 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: Borges

I am a fan, and my judgement is better than the leftists that populate the Hollywood world and it’s world of critics and scholars, and professors.

If you want to worship at the altar of the short lived actor and a kind of weird movie, feel free, but I consider the film one for beer and laughs.


77 posted on 05/11/2013 12:16:40 PM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Well, it has coarsened over the years along with the coarsening of morals.

Country used to be very rough and earthy. as did the people listening to it before the 1970s and pot reached the country world. "Knoxville Girl" is kind of a shocker, it was a hit from a very popular duet, the Louvin Brothers.

Here is the song that reached number 19 on the Billboard Country Singles chart in 1959, "Knoxville Girl"

""It’s perhaps their most powerful rendering of traditional folk music’s bleak vision of a dark and forlorn land, where love is absent and death is the only certainty. It’s the centerpiece of what is arguably the Louvins' finest album."The album is also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die."

There are some more examples here. Violence is a part of our folk music history

78 posted on 05/11/2013 12:39:40 PM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Thanks for the link. I will listen. I love low brow as much as the middle and high end. As long as it’s good.


79 posted on 05/11/2013 12:46:44 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Hey, I liked it! Patriotic country music is always good. You’re a song writer - that’s great.

My big concern about country music is that it has gotten very homogenous, if that’s the right word. Bland might be a better word. The kind of bumper music Sean Hannity plays. I always listened to Johnny Cash, Tammy Wynette, early Dolly Parton as a kid and young woman. Then I moved further back in time and became interested in bluegrass.


80 posted on 05/11/2013 12:52:46 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: ansel12

With all due respect this is part of a genre sometimes known as “Hicksploitation.”

To me it’s like comparing Stephen King to Mark Twain.


81 posted on 05/11/2013 2:36:02 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: miss marmelstein

Thank you for the compliment, knowing what a highbrow it comes from... :-)


82 posted on 05/11/2013 2:37:33 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

I’ve never heard country called that, when did you discover country, were they singing about cocaine and killing, and destroying property and cutting guys and cheating then?

Are you old enough to remember how violent and brutal the country world of bars and partying and life was before the 1970s?


83 posted on 05/11/2013 2:41:06 PM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: ansel12

Well I had an album of that stuff... it was marked hixploitation. Ranged from a song from the viewpoint of a gal who was going to commit suicide by letting a train run over her, to a hideously overdone (to the point of farce) version of Amazing Grace. Great if demons are what you’re into.


84 posted on 05/11/2013 2:54:00 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (How long before all this "fairness" kills everybody, even the poor it was supposed to help???)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Oh, stop it! Actually, I very much enjoyed it. I love patriotic country songs - even the new ones. I just remembered that several years ago, I directed a play and the music I used was “Take This Job and Shove It.” The play was about two guys on the assembly line.


85 posted on 05/11/2013 3:14:24 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

I think you are misguided if you think that country hits of the 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s and 1970s were because the
American people listening to country were of the demonic worshiping segment of the population.

Knoxville Girl for instance is centuries old, when you listen to old country hits, you don’t hear the sordid sex and cheating and cheap wives leaving husbands, the Honky Tonk violence and the casual taking of life, fighting and killing over cheap women and wives and husbands and easy sex? You don’t hear much sordid stuff in the Hank Williams songs, from Johnny Cash? Prison and killing men just to watch them die and cheap sex was a part of country music because people lived it and identified with it.

You said “” Today you’re likely to hear about the pleasures of some questionable tryst if you tune in to the country hits of Nashville (which I live next door to, by the way, now).””, listen to old country, pre-1970s it is a staple of country music and always has been.


86 posted on 05/11/2013 3:32:34 PM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: Peter Libra
I was enough struck by the style of your #62 to click thru to your profile, and subsequently am compelled to note what a treat I found it.

Seriously, your cadence and construction are almost lyrical in a way that reminded me of how we were taught, long ago in the midwest, to (hopefully) think and (surely) pattern any writing we may attempt.

Anyway, thank you   :^)

87 posted on 05/11/2013 3:39:17 PM PDT by tomkat
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To: tomkat
I hope you do not mind private mail. Well! praise indeed. I do own that I am my own most severe critic and it was said many moons ago "awkward sentence structure". This about what I had written at that time. I concede this is sometimes the case.

Anyway, not to ramble on too much, but today up in Great Lakes Country at the Canadian American border of Sault Ste Marie, it snowed. Lots of wet heavy snow. About 35 deg tonight as well. I have a modest rye whiskey in hand and will enjoy it, as I enjoyed your post. Cordially. PL.

88 posted on 05/11/2013 6:04:00 PM PDT by Peter Libra
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To: tomkat

Whoops!
Hit the wrong button and you have my mail for all to peruse. (chuckle).


89 posted on 05/11/2013 6:05:32 PM PDT by Peter Libra
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To: Peter Libra
If that's the most embarrassing thing that ever happens to ya in here, you're doin' great !   LOL

Cheers, and enjoy the quiet of the snow

90 posted on 05/11/2013 6:21:46 PM PDT by tomkat
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To: ansel12

It’s a masterpiece which is taught as one of the prime examples of cinematic expressionism. The director studied with Frank Lloyd Wright And it shows.


91 posted on 05/11/2013 7:13:03 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

The good news for you is that it is on DVD, so you can enjoy it as much as you like, it sucks, but as long as the usual crowd likes it, then great.


92 posted on 05/11/2013 7:20:35 PM PDT by ansel12 (Sodom and Gomorrah, flush with libertarians and liberals, short on social conservatives.)
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To: ansel12

The crowd knowledgable about cinema yes.


93 posted on 05/12/2013 5:43:52 AM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

That is your liberal arrogance and tribalism speaking, not all of us knowledgeable about cinema agree with your views.

You do tend to circle the liberal wagons though when other people have opinions that differ with the left side of the Hollywood world.


94 posted on 05/17/2013 9:17:54 PM PDT by ansel12
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To: ansel12

LOL What does liberal have to do with this? They aren’t just my views. It’s a classic that’s taught in film schools. Period. What you personally think of it is irrelevant. I know people who don’t like Citizen Kane and 2001. They are still great films.


95 posted on 05/18/2013 2:47:39 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

Actually my personal opinion is incredibly important, regardless of what you people teach to each other and repeat back and forth among you, but then I am the guy (and other observers like me) who you couldn’t believe was insightful enough to know about Ebert being liberal when you didn’t know and couldn’t see it with your own eyes.


96 posted on 05/21/2013 3:11:08 PM PDT by ansel12
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To: ansel12

Ebert’s politics are irrelevant to him being a great critic in his prime. What’s ‘you people’. Lol.


97 posted on 05/21/2013 7:24:34 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

Your inability to break from your crowd, and your lack of discernment was revealed in your inability to be aware of the bias that he brought to his personal opinions on films and Hollywood, you came late to that realization if you ever did realize it, and you still don’t seem to care much for people knowing it, like James Dean, Ebert seems like some sort of God to you.

Your incredible ego doesn’t make you anything more than just another movie fan with opinions, and not very original ones.


98 posted on 05/21/2013 8:38:28 PM PDT by ansel12
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To: ansel12

Ebert was a childhood inspiration. He contributed mightily to American culture by teaching people about cinema. All critics have some sort of bias. Telling someone to keep their opinions out of their criticism is like telling someone to keep their opinions out of their posts on FR.


99 posted on 05/22/2013 8:51:02 AM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges
Ebert was a childhood inspiration.

I obviously believe you.

100 posted on 05/22/2013 9:07:27 AM PDT by ansel12
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