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The US Is Putting More White People In Prison, And Meth Could Be To Blame
TBI ^ | 2-28-2013 | Erin Fuchs

Posted on 02/28/2013 7:43:39 AM PST by blam

The US Is Putting More White People In Prison, And Meth Could Be To Blame

Erin Fuchs
February 28, 2013

There's been a huge shift in the racial makeup of U.S. prisons in the past decade, The New York Times reports.

The Sentencing Project analyzed prison populations from 2000 to 2009, finding the rates of incarceration for blacks dropped sharply during that period: 30.7 percent for black women and 9.8 percent for men.

The report also found a major spike in incarceration rates for white men and women during the same period, according to The Times. The rate for white women increased 47.1 percent for white women and 8.5 percent for white men.

Rates of incarceration dropped slightly for Hispanic men but jumped 23.3 percent for Hispanic women.

A dramatic shift in a prison population is highly unusual, the Sentencing Project's director Marc Mauer told The Times. From the Times:

"But the trend is clear, Mr. Mauer said, adding that no single factor could explain the shifting figures but that changes in drug laws and sentencing for drug offenses probably played a large role. Other possible contributors included decreasing arrest rates for blacks, the rising number of whites and Hispanics serving mandatory sentences for methamphetamine abuse, and socioeconomic shifts that have disproportionately affected white women."

(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: addiction; drugs; meth; prison; warondrugs; whites; wod; wodlist; wosd
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

If drugs are legalized, it’s critical they not be taxed at all. If you want them taxed, you are foolish or evil. You want the government to be a drug dealer? Once that happens, it will be a nightmare. They will make the Zetas look like a joke.


51 posted on 02/28/2013 9:29:06 AM PST by nickcarraway
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Except that criminals will no longer reap hyperinflated profits but will be competed out of that market.

Apparently it is true that a libertarian is nothing more than a conservative without common sense. Meth is highly addictive to the point that after one use you are hooked. And a meth head will do anything for his next fix. I guess you have no problem with zombie-like meth heads ravaging our cities and murdering innocent people. Beam me up Scotty.

52 posted on 02/28/2013 9:31:38 AM PST by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: nickcarraway
make all drugs legal, tax them nonexcessively, let government regulate them, and criminals will no longer reap hyperinflated profits but will be competed out of that market.

If drugs are legalized, it’s critical they not be taxed at all. If you want them taxed, you are foolish or evil. You want the government to be a drug dealer?

The drugs alcohol and tobacco are taxed - does that make government a dealer in those drugs? (For the record, I don't think any drugs should be taxed differently than any other consumer item.)

53 posted on 02/28/2013 9:38:09 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: blam
Meth is some nasty stuff!


54 posted on 02/28/2013 9:42:15 AM PST by Drew68
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To: JustSayNoToNannies; dfwgator
And their source is hard numbers from Swiss bank UBS.

"Hard numbers"? Not quite. And I had forgotten how conservative European bankers are.

the ordinary Malaysian citizen has about the same domestic purchasing power as the Singaporean.

And what is this "domestic purchasing power"? Apparently it is the amount of money the average Singaporean has left after paying for non-negotiables like housing.

The average home in Singapore is a modern 3-bedroom high-rise apartment. 87% of Singaporeans own their homes.

Most urban Malaysians live in project housing subsidized by the government.

So the average Singaporean has enough money to make mortgage payments on a nice apartment with all modern amenities plus has a good amount of disposable income.

The average urban Malaysian can never afford to pay a mortgage on a nice apartment, but instead lives in rundown government housing with shared toilet facilities.

I find it interesting that one of the indices in the article of how economically disadvantaged Singaporeans are is that they have to work almost 75% as hard as a Russian has to in order to buy an iPod nano.

Sure sounds like increadible, grinding poverty to me.

55 posted on 02/28/2013 9:45:51 AM PST by wideawake
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To: SVTCobra03
Meth is highly addictive

True.

to the point that after one use you are hooked.

Sounds like urban legend to me. Have any evidence?

56 posted on 02/28/2013 9:47:34 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: JimSEA
.....the true target of the green movement is industry and not species protection.

Always was....always will be.

57 posted on 02/28/2013 9:47:49 AM PST by Roccus
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To: Drew68

LOL!


58 posted on 02/28/2013 9:49:47 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: Drew68

Hah!

This might be because when gov. wants to blame yt they count all non blacks i.e all Central and South American’s as European white. This trick is standard operating procedure in all facets of US society so as to infer whites are more inclined to criminal behavior and thus culpable for all of societies wrongs.


59 posted on 02/28/2013 9:49:56 AM PST by Sheapdog (Chew the meat, spit out the bones)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

Yes but a Meth manufacturer would be a startup and wouldn’t have the capital of RJR and Lorillard.


60 posted on 02/28/2013 9:55:56 AM PST by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: AppyPappy
Yes but a Meth manufacturer would be a startup and wouldn’t have the capital of RJR and Lorillard.

Who says an existing company wouldn't get into the market?

61 posted on 02/28/2013 10:03:48 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: Buckeye McFrog; dfwgator; wideawake
Third highest per-capita income in the world, with a government that’s like Michael Bloomberg on steroids.

"What do you call a country that takes 35% of salaries to finance a state investment fund run by the prime minister's wife? Where the government controls companies responsible for 60% of gross domestic product and 85% of its citizens live in public housing? And a country with stringent restrictions on the media and public information, limits on freedom of expression and assembly, and courts that help perpetuate the domination of the only ruling party the country has ever known?

"The country described above is Singapore"

- Asia Times, Jan 20, 2011

62 posted on 02/28/2013 10:12:18 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: wideawake

Singapore is clean and people live well enough but there is absolutely no heart and soul to that place. It’s a concrete and glass wasteland with no character. I don’t want to live in a place like that.


63 posted on 02/28/2013 10:16:18 AM PST by rudabaga
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To: blam

Depending on how big they are -— Meth dealers should be hanged or shot (their choice)
Lesser dealers exiled after being indelibly branded


64 posted on 02/28/2013 10:26:04 AM PST by dennisw (too much of a good thing is a bad thing --- Joe Pine)
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To: dennisw
Dealers already face a real threat of death from competitors and twitchy customers, but they continue to deal and if killed are quickly replaced.
65 posted on 02/28/2013 10:35:37 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies; Buckeye McFrog; dfwgator
Ah, the objective perspective of Muhammad Cohen.

What do you call a country that takes 35% of salaries to finance a state investment fund run by the prime minister's wife?

Unlike in America, where Social Security is a Ponzi scheme, in Singapore retirement funds deducted from paychecks are invested in a state-administered fund called Temasek Holdings, whose financial records are publicly available.

The CEO of Temasek is Ho Ching.

Ho Ching became CEO of Temasek in 2002, two years before her husband was elected Prime Minister of Singapore.

She has a degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University, was a defense engineer for more than a decade, then went to the private sector and worked her way up to CEO of a technology company.

She is a self-made woman who was not appointed to her job by her husband.

Where the government controls companies responsible for 60% of gross domestic product

The Singaporean government, instead of giving welfare handouts like a Third World country would do, uses tax money to seed investments in companies that gainfully employ Singaporeans and which plow their profits back into the local economy.

and 85% of its citizens live in public housing?

This is simply false. While the real estate companies that finance Singaporean housing have the Singaporean government among their investors, this is not subsidized housing provided by the government. It is housing paid for by its residents.

And a country with stringent restrictions on the media and public information

Its restrictions are common to other British Commonwealth countries, like - famously - Canada and the UK with their "superinjunctions" on "sensitive information."

limits on freedom of expression and assembly

Singapore censors pornography (like America in the 1950s) and it also requires police permits for public demonstrations (like pretty much every city in America). It also enforces criminal libel more strictly than we do in America.

and courts that help perpetuate the domination of the only ruling party the country has ever known?

The PAP has held a majority in the Singapore Parliament for 53 years. The Democrats held a majority of the US Congress for 40 years. The PAP lost 6% of its vote in the past election and Singapore's left-wing minority now holds a 40% position in the Parliament.

Muhammad Cohen (formerly Eliot Cohen) is a long time critic of Singapore, which he sees as anti-Muslim and anti-Indonesian.

He's not a reliable source of unbiased information.

66 posted on 02/28/2013 10:38:45 AM PST by wideawake
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To: rudabaga
Singapore is clean and people live well enough but there is absolutely no heart and soul to that place.

Maybe so, but I don't think it has anything to do with their policies towards drug dealers.

67 posted on 02/28/2013 10:43:43 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: wideawake

Good response on the Singapore government. I can’t help but to prefer the “wild East” of living in Thailand as we did. I don’t, however deny its problems.


68 posted on 02/28/2013 10:45:35 AM PST by JimSEA ( “what difference does it make?”)
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To: rudabaga
Singapore is clean and people live well enough but there is absolutely no heart and soul to that place. It’s a concrete and glass wasteland with no character.

No character?

Few cities outside of New York and London have such varied and high-quality dining options as Singapore.

Because it is a port city that has basically been built from the ground up starting in the 1960s it does not have quaint old buildings, or picturesque temples, or stunning natural vistas, etc.

All its architecture is modern as a result, so it certainly doesn't have the appeal of Bali or old Hong Kong.

But it has its other charms - mostly food and musical performances.

69 posted on 02/28/2013 10:47:44 AM PST by wideawake
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To: blam

surprised no one has commented on “The Sentencing Project analyzed prison populations from 2000 to 2009, finding the rates of incarceration for blacks dropped sharply during that period: 30.7 percent for black women and 9.8 percent for men.”


70 posted on 02/28/2013 10:48:09 AM PST by huldah1776
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To: wideawake; Buckeye McFrog; dfwgator
She is a self-made woman who was not appointed to her job by her husband.

Because the only way for him to get her that job was by direct appointment - indirect influence and favor-currying are nonexistent in Singapore's government.

Look, "Third World sh!thole" was an overstatement - but it's clear to me that Singapore, whatever its positive aspects, is not a place that our Land of the Free should emulate.

71 posted on 02/28/2013 10:48:12 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: wideawake; dfwgator

Thanks, folks, for your accurate rejoinders to “JustSayNoToNannies”.

Singapore works! Wonderful place.


72 posted on 02/28/2013 10:57:32 AM PST by BwanaNdege ("To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize"- Voltaire)
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To: AppyPappy

There is, I repeat NO, comparison to be made between tobacco and meth.


73 posted on 02/28/2013 11:03:46 AM PST by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Because the only way for him to get her that job was by direct appointment - indirect influence and favor-currying are nonexistent in Singapore's government.

She got the job before he was ever elected Prime Minister.

Temasek is a $90B investment fund.

It is considered the most transparent sovereign wealth fund in the world.

Because of this transparency, she makes considerably less money than she would in other roles that are under less public scrutiny.

If this were about nepotism, her husband could set her up much more profitably if she and he were both corrupt.

She is very smart, and she is very good at what she does.

Insinuating - with zero evidence - that she got her job underhandedly is pretty low.

Look, "Third World sh!thole" was an overstatement - but it's clear to me that Singapore, whatever its positive aspects, is not a place that our Land of the Free should emulate.

We don't need to emulate anyone. We have the world's best Constitution.

74 posted on 02/28/2013 11:06:02 AM PST by wideawake
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To: wideawake; dfwgator

“We don’t need to emulate anyone.”

I’m glad we agree - dfwgator seemed to think otherwise (”do it like Singapore”).

More on Singapore:

“The visit of a government minister to the area last year provoked a cheeky protest, with cartoon cut-outs of a white elephant posted around the closed [light-rail commuter] station greeting his arrival.

“Singapore’s no-nonsense government took the matter seriously. The police launched an investigation to try to identify the culprits and issued a warning to local grassroots leaders.

“The police still had their eye on the troublesome area even after the government decided to open the station. A plan by a group of female high-school students to help raise money for charity by selling white elephant T-shirts at the station’s inauguration ceremony was seen as a potentially subversive act.”

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d7d6f9c2-87b8-11da-8762-0000779e2340.html#ixzz2MDqcfCso


75 posted on 02/28/2013 11:11:44 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: BwanaNdege

ping to previous post


76 posted on 02/28/2013 11:12:56 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: Gabz

Except that lawyers see $$$$ with both of them.


77 posted on 02/28/2013 11:15:30 AM PST by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: wideawake
We don't need to emulate anyone. We have the world's best Constitution.

All I said was that if the US was really serious in the Drug War, and trying to stop it, that's what they'd do.....What they do now is ineffective and only serves to enrich the coffers of government without doing anything to solve the problem.

78 posted on 02/28/2013 11:19:34 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: wideawake; JustSayNoToNannies

Sorry, that post was meant for JustSayNo...


79 posted on 02/28/2013 11:20:55 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator; wideawake
We don't need to emulate anyone. We have the world's best Constitution.

All I said was that if the US was really serious in the Drug War, and trying to stop it, that's what they'd do

Do you advocate that the US do what Singapore does - yes or no?

80 posted on 02/28/2013 11:21:54 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: dfwgator
All I said was that if the US was really serious in the Drug War, and trying to stop it, that's what they'd do

There's nothing unconstitutional about imposing the death penalty on felons.

In what most US conservatives would consider a golden age, we used to hang people for stealing livestock.

81 posted on 02/28/2013 11:22:59 AM PST by wideawake
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Seems like press handwringing to me.

If a US cabinet secretary was supposed to be visiting a secure location and that location had actually been broken into and festooned with decorations, there would definitely be an investigation here as well.

And the police were apparently telling the students that if they marched or demonstrated in matching t-shirts it would be considered a protest without a permit.

That definitely sounds overly strict, but it also is a lie by the students that it was not a political protest - since the white elephant symbol is a well-known political protest symbol in Singapore and has been worn and used in plenty of permitted protest marches and demonstrations.

82 posted on 02/28/2013 11:31:41 AM PST by wideawake
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

I don’t know. Certainly in the case of harder drugs I would certainly consider it. I don’t even care about pot, they can legalize that for all I care. But drugs like Meth or heroin should be dealt with in the most harsh manner. But if you truly want to win the “War on Drugs” that indeed is what it would take to do it, otherwise it’s a complete waste of time and money.


83 posted on 02/28/2013 11:33:03 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: wideawake
and that location had actually been broken into

"posted around the closed station" - where's the break-in?

"The government [of Singapore] has broad powers to limit citizens' rights and to handicap political opposition, which it used. Caning is an allowable punishment for numerous offenses. The following human rights problems were reported: preventive detention, executive influence over the judiciary, infringement of citizens' privacy rights, restriction of speech and press freedom and the practice of self-censorship by journalists, restriction of freedom of assembly and freedom of association, some restriction of freedom of religion, and some trafficking in persons." - State Department, March 6, 2007 (http://www.state.gov/j/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78790.htm)

84 posted on 02/28/2013 11:41:13 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: dfwgator
I don’t even care about pot, they can legalize that for all I care.

Agreed.

But drugs like Meth or heroin should be dealt with in the most harsh manner.

Drug policy doesn't operate in a vacuum; what works in a tightly-controlled regime like Singapore (see post #84) is by no means guaranteed to work in our Land of the Free.

85 posted on 02/28/2013 11:45:50 AM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: AppyPappy

That wasn’t the comparison you were making that I was talking about.


86 posted on 02/28/2013 12:03:02 PM PST by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

I am pro-choice when it comes to meth dealers and other drug dealers. They should be given a choice of hanging or firing squad. Guillotine if they really want it and their doctor OKs it


87 posted on 02/28/2013 12:03:39 PM PST by dennisw (too much of a good thing is a bad thing --- Joe Pine)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies; dfwgator
where's the break-in?

The station was closed.

Caning is an allowable punishment for numerous offenses.

Good.

preventive detention

In the US this is known as "civil commitment."

executive influence over the judiciary

In the US, the executive not only influences the federal judiciary, it directly appoints friends of the administration to the federal judiciary. Though I'm sure Sonia Sotomayor would never let her adoring love of President Obama influence her rulings.

infringement of citizens' privacy rights

In the US, we call them "warrantless wiretaps."

restriction of speech

In the US we call these "gag orders."

and press freedom

Too vague a claim to be meaningful. Preventing photography of returning war dead from Iraq was considered an infringement on "press freedom" here, for example.

the practice of self-censorship by journalists

Is that when the US press decides to report only good things about President Obama and only bad things about President Bush? Is that what is meant by "self-censorship"?

Should there be a law against not saying things you would like to say? How would it be enforced?

restriction of freedom of assembly and freedom of association

In the US these are called "free speech zones" and "parade permits."

some restriction of freedom of religion

That's incredibly vague, but it probably refers to the Singaporean government's refusal to allow mosques to use ear-splitting amplification for their calls to prayer and its forbidding of Muslims (and others, but only Muslims did this) to let their congregations spill out into the streets during worship.

and some trafficking in persons

Well, we know that no sex trafficking ever occurs in the United States at all, ever, because it's illegal here. It's also illegal in Singapore, but sometimes Singaporeans break this law, even though no American ever has.

88 posted on 02/28/2013 12:05:42 PM PST by wideawake
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Do you advocate that the US do what Singapore does - yes or no?

Yes! Execute the drug dealer after a fair trial. Marijuana dealers you exile for 10 years...now that might cut off your supply so I get the anxiety. When does your medical marijuana card expire?

89 posted on 02/28/2013 12:06:59 PM PST by dennisw (too much of a good thing is a bad thing --- Joe Pine)
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To: wideawake
Too vague a claim to be meaningful.

Then read the report, to which I linked, for details. Or just keep shaking the pompoms for Singapore.

90 posted on 02/28/2013 12:10:18 PM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
Then read the report, to which I linked, for details.

The report is equally vague - while it concedes that Singapore does not actually engage in press censorship, it opines that Singapore's laws contain provisions that could lead to press censorship.

So do our laws, and the laws of pretty much any nation.

No concrete examples are given.

Or just keep shaking the pompoms for Singapore.

You are desperately googling around trying to find anything that looks like supporting evidence for your thesis that Singapore is a bad place.

It seems like you are shaking the pompoms for Singapore's Workers' Party.

Face it: Singapore is a modern, wealthy country with first class amenities and facilities and a flexible and forward-looking economy.

Its culture may be too staid and foreign for your tastes, but your urge to paint it as either a totalitarian dictatorship or a "Third World ****hole" are doomed to fail, because both of those things are unfair allegations.

91 posted on 02/28/2013 12:31:46 PM PST by wideawake
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To: wideawake

From the report:

Government leaders historically have used court proceedings, in particular defamation suits, against political opponents and critics

Law enforcement agencies, including the Internal Security Department and the Corrupt Practices Investigation Board, have extensive networks for gathering information and conducting surveillance and highly sophisticated capabilities to monitor telephone and other private conversations. No court warrants are required for such operations. The law permits government monitoring of Internet use.

While the ISA has not been invoked in recent years against political opponents of the government, political opposition and criticism remained restricted by the government’s authority to define these powers broadly.

Two companies, Singapore Press Holdings Limited (SPH) and MediaCorp, own all general circulation newspapers in the four official languages—English, Chinese, Malay, and Tamil. MediaCorp is wholly owned by the government investment company.

Government-linked companies and organizations operated all domestic broadcast television channels and almost all radio stations.

Banned publications consisted primarily of sexually oriented materials but also included some religious and political publications.

The law permits government monitoring of Internet use, and the government closely monitored Internet activities such as blogs and podcasts as sources of political dissent, including before the May election. On April 3, MICA prohibited the use of podcasts and videocasts as campaign tools during the election period.

Most associations, societies, clubs, religious groups, and other organizations with more than 10 members are required to register with the government under the Societies Act. [...] The government has absolute discretion in applying criteria to register or dissolve societies.

The Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act (MRHA) gives the government the power to restrain leaders and members of religious groups and institutions from carrying out political activities, “exciting disaffection against” the government

Under the Societies Act, the government deregistered and banned meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses in 1972 and in 1982 dissolved the Unification Church. While the government did not outlaw the profession or propagation of the beliefs of Jehovah’s Witnesses and does not arrest members merely for being believers, the result of deregistration was to make meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses illegal. The community numbered approximately 2,000 in the country, and members of Jehovah’s Witnesses continued to refuse to perform national military service. The government also banned all written materials published by the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ publishing affiliates, the International Bible Students Association and the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society. A person in possession of banned literature can be fined up to $1,140 (S$2,000), and for holding a meeting, the fine can be as high as $2,280 (S$4,000). In August one member of Jehovah’s Witnesses was charged with three counts of importation of banned literature. He was convicted on two counts and fined $3,420 (S$6,000).

The Films Act bans political films and recorded televised programs


92 posted on 02/28/2013 12:50:11 PM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
No court warrants are required for such operations. The law permits government monitoring of Internet use.

Remind you of any other countries you know?

While the ISA has not been invoked in recent years against political opponents of the government

That's interesting.

Two companies, Singapore Press Holdings Limited (SPH) and MediaCorp, own all general circulation newspapers

So two companies own the print media for a market of 5 million. In the US, it's more like four for 300 million people.

Government-linked companies and organizations operated all domestic broadcast television channels and almost all radio stations.

So, basically just like the UK.

Banned publications consisted primarily of sexually oriented materials but also included some religious and political publications.

Kind of the way Germany bans racialist publications or Scientologist publications?

On April 3, MICA prohibited the use of podcasts and videocasts as campaign tools during the election period.

Campaign laws limiting free speech? Good thing we don't have those, right Senator McCain?

Most associations, societies, clubs, religious groups, and other organizations with more than 10 members are required to register with the government under the Societies Act. [...] The government has absolute discretion in applying criteria to register or dissolve societies.

A law that is never enforced.

While the government did not outlaw the profession or propagation of the beliefs of Jehovah’s Witnesses and does not arrest members merely for being believers, the result of deregistration was to make meetings of Jehovah’s Witnesses illegal.

And yet the JWs exist and meet and grow in number in Singapore.

While no one can conscionably agree with this policy, this is a typical story for the JWs and is a repeat of their experiences in WWII and Korea in the United States. Singapore has required military service (like the US' peacetime draft in the 1950s), and JWs refuse - of course - to either do military service or alternative service in lieu of combat service.

So, basically, Singapore is guilty of all the things that the US government is currently guilty of - or of things that the US government was guilty of before the 1960s.

93 posted on 02/28/2013 1:21:31 PM PST by wideawake
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To: wideawake
Two companies, Singapore Press Holdings Limited (SPH) and MediaCorp, own all general circulation newspapers [TEXT OMITTED BY WIDEAWAKE:] MediaCorp is wholly owned by the government investment company.

So two companies own the print media for a market of 5 million. In the US, it's more like four for 300 million people.

What a dishonest omission. For shame. Since you're willing to lie by omission to defend Singapore, I'm done here.

94 posted on 02/28/2013 1:25:45 PM PST by JustSayNoToNannies ("The Lord has removed His judgments against you" - Zep. 3:15)
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To: blam
Statement: "The US Is Putting More White People In Prison, And Meth Could Be To Blame"

Response: If meth is the cause than I advocate harder penalties such as whipping as whites no better.

Comment: On the other hand I suspect there is a little selection of whites to "balance the scales."

95 posted on 02/28/2013 1:53:13 PM PST by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: rudabaga
Singapore is clean and people live well enough but there is absolutely no heart and soul to that place. It’s a concrete and glass wasteland with no character. I don’t want to live in a place like that.

Agreed. The only interesting part of town is Newton's Circus or a few yards along Boat Quay Rd between S Bridge Rd and the Esplanade. The rest is sterile & boring. Aside from the crime there is little difference in housing between Singapore and any public housing development in Brooklyn. And forget about owning a car.

96 posted on 02/28/2013 6:35:59 PM PST by skeeter
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To: JustSayNoToNannies

Wideawake is probably either the ambassador from Singapore or is located there and has his postings scanned by the government of Singapore. I suspect that it is frowned upon to criticize the government of Singapore, if not illegal, so don’t worry about his cheerleading, it may be just for the censors reading his posts.


97 posted on 02/28/2013 7:03:37 PM PST by freeandfreezing
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To: blam

Why the interest in the skin color of criminals. I always approve of putting criminals who pose a danger to others in prison for a LONG time. I have never heard of a death penalty that I didn’t find 100% appropriate without any reference to skin color. Hillary put it best: “What difference does it make?”


98 posted on 02/28/2013 7:29:26 PM PST by Pollster1
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To: JustSayNoToNannies
"Lie by omission"? Please. Quite a bit of handwringing here.

I don't see any meaningful difference between a Singaporean newspaper being officially owned by the Republic of Singapore and the New York Times being unofficially owned by the Democratic Party.

Very few people agonize over the UK government owning the BBC.

Should the government own the media? Of course not.

Do they own the media in the UK and Singapore? In large part, yes.

Do they own the media, in large part, in the US? They sure do, whenever a Democrat is in office.

99 posted on 03/01/2013 5:56:06 AM PST by wideawake
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To: freeandfreezing
Wideawake is probably either the ambassador from Singapore or is located there and has his postings scanned by the government of Singapore. I suspect that it is frowned upon to criticize the government of Singapore, if not illegal, so don’t worry about his cheerleading, it may be just for the censors reading his posts.

Putting aside the fact that it is extremely rude not to ping someone when you are discussing them, what is your logic here?

That I joined FR 14 years ago as an agent of the government of Singapore and quietly bided my time and waited to comment on Singapore until now?

While I completely understand that you do not have the candlepower to actually address my posts rationally, your comment is not any the less pathetic for that.

100 posted on 03/01/2013 6:02:47 AM PST by wideawake
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