Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Judge Not: An Ignorant Analysis Of The Lynne Stewart Case.
NRO ^ | 02-23-05 | Andrew McCarthy

Posted on 02/23/2005 7:31:28 AM PST by MamaLucci

The New York Times last week offered a specious attack on Lynne Stewart's conviction in an embarrassingly ill-informed op-ed by Andrew Napolitano, Fox News's "Senior Judicial Analyst."

A little background before we examine this commentator's latest wade out of his depth. Napolitano was once a midlevel state-court judge in New Jersey. Assuming for argument's sake that this experience is a sure sign of actual legal expertise, it would be an exceedingly narrow one: to wit, he might be thought an authority on the constitution and laws of the Garden State. Fox, however, has opportunistically chosen to ignore the "New Jersey" modifier in his former title and focus myopically on the "Judge" part. The network has adopted a convention whereby all Fox News correspondents refer to Napolitano on the air not by name but as "Judge." He then proceeds to expound with glib certainty on all manner of legal issues, including matters of federal law, for which he appears to have little familiarity.

That the "Judge" is out of his league in these areas is often painfully obvious (see, e.g., Ramesh Ponnuru's dissection of Napolitano's shoddy op-ed on the Patriot Act last March). Fox's viewers, nonetheless, are led to believe they are recipients of pearls of wisdom from a jurisprudential giant. It's a good racket and has recently landed the "Judge" on the bestseller list with a tome, tirelessly hyped by Fox, that is presumptuously entitled Constitutional Chaos: What Happens When the Government Breaks Its Own Laws. (Hint: He's not talking about the government that sits in Trenton.)

Napolitano's latest op-ed should be called something similar. Maybe: "Chaos: What Happens When a Poseur Analyzes a Federal Prosecution." This is a truly excruciating read. There are, no doubt, any number of highly qualified academics and defense lawyers who are sympathetic to the cause of Lynne Stewart — a defense lawyer convicted for actions arising out of purportedly providing legal services to a client — and who would have given their right arms in exchange for space in the New York Times's vaunted opinion page. The Gray Lady, instead, managed to find someone nearly incapable of getting a single fact right, much less of explaining the relevant principles.

Clearly, Napolitano was bent on attacking the prosecution (a "perverse victory in the Justice Department's assault on the Constitution") as a travesty that (surprise!) just happens to be the very kind of "chaos" you can read about if you fork up the 20 bucks for his book. That being the case, he might have done what all actual federal judges, all competent practitioners, and even most law students would have thought to do: He might have read the indictment.

But that, of course, might have placed the facts in the way of the bombast. Not wishing to be so encumbered, the "Judge" maintains that Stewart was convicted of supporting terrorism and making false statements because of conversations with her client, the convicted terrorist Omar Abdel Rahman (a.k.a., "the Blind Sheik"), on which the government was able to eavesdrop because the notorious John Ashcroft unconstitutionally changed the law. As Napolitano puts it:

Just after 9/11, Attorney General John Ashcroft gave himself the power to bypass the lawyer-client privilege, which every court in the United States has upheld, and eavesdrop on conversations between prisoners and their lawyers if he had reason to believe they were being used to "further facilitate acts of violence or terrorism." The regulation became effective immediately.

Of course, had Napolitano taken the few minutes necessary to read the indictment (which is freely available online), he might have learned that all of the conversations and actions that resulted in Stewart's conviction took place about two years or more before the post-9/11 regulation (which the, er, Judge, in any event, mischaracterizes). That is: before George W. Bush was president, before John Ashcroft was attorney general, and before 9/11 ever happened. This investigation was very ably conducted by, and took place under the auspices of incontestably proper regulations imposed by, the Clinton Justice Department.

As the indictment explains, and as those of us who actually followed the trial well know, Attorney General Janet Reno began curtailing the Blind Sheik's prison privileges in April 1997 — i.e., a year-and-a-half after his conviction. She did this by placing what were known as "special administrative measures" (SAMs) on his confinement. The SAMs sharply limited Abdel Rahman's ability to communicate with the outside world, which in his case was crucial to national security because of his unique ability to command the commission of terrorist attacks.

At the end of 1997, however, the Sheik's Egyptian terror organization brutally murdered 58 tourists in Luxor as part of a campaign to compel his release by extortion. Subsequently, the Reno Justice Department — again, entirely consistent with federal law — beefed up the SAMs, now prescribing that the Sheik would "not be permitted to talk with, meet with, correspond with, or otherwise communicate with any member, or representative, of the news media, in person, by telephone, by furnishing a recorded message, through the mails, through his attorney(s), or otherwise."

In addition, Abdel Rahman's attorneys, including Stewart, were required in 1999 to sign an affirmation that they would abide by the SAMs. There was nothing novel about this given that, in May 1998, Attorney General Reno had required these lawyers to agree not to "use [their] meetings, correspondence, or phone calls with Abdel Rahman to pass messages between third parties (including, but not limited to, the media) and Abdel Rahman." There was also nothing controversial about it because Abdel Rahman's case had long been over — he was no longer presumed innocent or meeting with lawyers to prepare his defense.

In May 2000, moreover, Stewart willingly signed an affirmation for the Reno Justice Department in which she agreed "to abide by [the] terms" of the SAMs then in effect on Abdel Rahman. As the indictment spells out, "In particular, STEWART agreed that she would 'only be accompanied by translators for the purpose of communicating with inmate Abdel Rahman concerning legal matters' and that she would not 'use [her] meetings, correspondence, or phone calls with Abdel Rahman to pass messages between third parties (including, but not limited to, the media) and Abdel Rahman.'"

Meanwhile, the meetings between Stewart and Abdel Rahman that became damning evidence in Stewart's trial all took place in 1999 and 2000 — while John Ashcroft was still a senator in Missouri. Leaving aside his cluelessness about when the meetings happened, Napolitano inanely labels Stewart's participation in them as "gibberish." Actually, they were discussions with a master terrorist who had had a hand in murdering the last Egyptian president, and who had been convicted at trial of conspiring to murder the current Egyptian president, about the need to overthrow the current Egyptian regime. Specifically, they included consideration of whether the Sheik should call for the end of a tenuous ceasefire agreement — i.e., whether he should give the green light, as he uniquely could do, to a new round of terror attacks.

Not exactly a "legal matter" — even if it's the sort of thing that somehow strikes Napolitano as mere gibberish. It was only a month after signing the agreement not to pass messages from Abdel Rahman to the media when Stewart issued a press release announcing that the Sheik was "withdrawing his support for the cease-fire that currently exists."

If anything, Napolitano's treatment of the relevant federal law is even more risible than his hopelessly inaccurate rendering of the facts. The post-9/11 Ashcroft regulation had utterly nothing to do with the Stewart case, but even had it been applicable, it is not, as Napolitano blathers, an instance of the Attorney General rather than Congress "writ[ing] federal criminal laws...with criminal penalties."

To begin with, neither the SAMs imposed by Attorney General Reno nor the post-9/11 Ashcroft regulation are "criminal laws," and neither impose "criminal penalties." I am not competent to explain to Napolitano how state government is organized in New Jersey, but in the federal system we have government that is tripartite. The branches interact ("checks-and-balances"), but each has its own sphere of responsibilities ("separation of powers"). When a branch is acting within its own sphere, as the Justice Department is with respect to the custody of convicted federal prisoners, it is permitted to make its own regulations subject to the restrictions of the Constitution (e.g., the Eighth Amendment, barring cruel and unusual punishments) and any proper legislation. This is why, notwithstanding the good Judge's foot-stamping, Stewart and her very able lawyers were unable to get evidence of conversations with her client thrown out. There was nothing remotely unconstitutional about the Justice Department constricting the liberties of a convicted felon in the custody of its bureau of prisons.

None of these regulations, furthermore, has anything to do with "criminal penalties." Criminal penalties are Congress's prerogative to define. Stewart was not convicted of violating a Reno or Ashcroft regulation. She was convicted of violating statutory offenses prescribed by Congress: the federal false statements law, and a federal law that forbids providing material support to terrorists. The penalties imposed at sentence will flow from those statutes, not from any Justice Department rules.

But wait a minute, Napolitano insists. "[T]he Sixth Amendment...grants all persons the right to consult with a lawyer in confidence." Well, maybe someplace, but here in America the Sixth Amendment applies only to "criminal prosecutions," and guarantees the assistance of counsel to an "accused." Abdel Rahman's criminal prosecution ended with his conviction in 1995. It's been nearly a decade since he's been an "accused" (the judgment of conviction was entered when he was sentenced in January 1996, and his appeals were rejected in 1999). He did not have a right to counsel under the Sixth Amendment at all when he was conspiring — not consulting — with Stewart in 1999 and 2000. It is probable that, consistent with the Constitution, he could have been entirely barred from meeting with attorneys. As it is, however, the Justice Department determined to allow him that privilege and was well within its authority to impose reasonable restrictions on it.

Moreover, even when the Sixth Amendment does actually apply and where the attorney-client privilege is at issue, the attorney must be acting as an attorney to enjoy the benefits of confidentiality. Federal law, like the law of most states, has long recognized what is known as the "crime/fraud" exception to the privilege. Attorney-client communications lose their protection if they are in furtherance of an ongoing crime, as Stewart's clearly were.

Not so fast, splutters His Honor. What about the First Amendment? Napolitano inveighs that the prison regulations:

also violate the First Amendment's right to free speech. Especially in a controversial case, a defense lawyer is right to advocate for her client in the press, just as the government uses the press to put forward its case. Unless there is a court order that bars both sides from speaking to reporters, it should be up to the lawyer to decide whether to help her client through the news media.

Ms. Stewart's constitutional right to speak to the news media about a matter of public interest is absolute and should prevent the government from prosecuting her....

It's hard to figure where to begin... First, yes, Judge, the Sheik, and Ms. Stewart were once in a controversial case together. But it ended ten years ago — perhaps you read about it. Second, lawyers involved in a federal case do not, under the First Amendment, have an unqualified right, let alone an "absolute" right, to advocate for the client in the media or to opine generally about "a matter of public interest." Even when a criminal prosecution is ongoing, the U.S. Supreme Court has, for many, many years, held that participants in the litigation may be tightly regulated in what they may disclose. Thus, most courts, including the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, where Abdel Rahman was tried, have widely known local rules which restrict what counsel may say publicly. Lawyers may not be admitted to the bar of those courts without representing that they are familiar with and understand such rules.

Further, no one, including lawyers, has an absolute right to communicate freely with the press. A lawyer, for example, who learns of classified information in a litigation and reveals it to the press commits a serious felony. Similarly, a lawyer who disseminates information covered by a gag order may be jailed for contempt of court. And, most pertinently, an individual who happens to hold a law license but who is in fact functioning as a contributing member of an ongoing criminal conspiracy may be prosecuted — including for acts that further the conspiracy, such as communicating messages from a terror kingpin to his murderous underlings.

That leads us directly to the most breathtakingly moronic assertion in Napolitano's litany: "[S]ince when does announcing someone else's opinion about a cease-fire — as Ms. Stewart did, saying the sheik no longer supported one that had been observed in Egypt — amount to advocating an act of terrorism?" Well, ever since, Judge, there has been a "someone else" who runs a criminal enterprise and whose "opinions" are known to be the triggers of barbarous actions — in this instance, indiscriminate mass homicides.

Maybe Napolitano hasn't noticed lo these last, oh, 25 years or so, but when Abdel Rahman's opinions get announced, people somehow always manage to end up dead. Indeed, after the 9/11 attacks, Osama bin Laden told the press that the actions of Mohammed Atta and company were justified by a fatwa issued by the self-same Sheik from jail. Maybe we should let bin Laden alone, too. I mean, sure, 3,000 people were slaughtered, but, after all, he was just announcing someone else's opinion.

The Times ought to be embarrassed. Fox News ought to be more embarrassed.

— Andrew C. McCarthy, who led the 1995 terrorism prosecution against Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman and eleven others, is a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: lynnestewert; napolitano; poseur; stooge; terrorist
FINALLY, someone is challenging "Judge" Napolitano on some of the BS he shovels on Fox News........a long time coming, IMHO.
1 posted on 02/23/2005 7:31:39 AM PST by MamaLucci
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Napolitano seems like a nice-enough guy, but I've always been put off by the pretentiousness involved in him always being addressed as 'Judge.' As the column demonstrates, he is nothing more than a former, relatively minor, state judge, and is anything but a legal scholar. This column is absolutely devastating to Napolitano's reputation. Fox can and should do better.


2 posted on 02/23/2005 7:40:56 AM PST by governsleastgovernsbest (Watching the Today Show since 2002 so you don't have to.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Sometimes I agree with Napolitano. Other times I do not.

In any event, everytime he-or anyone else at FOX-refers to him as "Judge" I cringe.

If he's off the bench he should stop using the honorific when referring to himself. If he was still on the bench he shouldn't be shilling on TV.


3 posted on 02/23/2005 7:41:26 AM PST by Behind Liberal Lines (Ann Coulter for Cornell Trustee:http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1344035/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Nice to get the full story instead of the talking head versions that opine about their "feelings". Thanks for sharing. Waiting on the retraction/correction....
Pigs on the wing.


4 posted on 02/23/2005 7:42:36 AM PST by kc2theline (Support our troops and the CIC that sends them to defend us.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Challenging? More than that! I'd say game, set, and match! Thanks for posting the article, MamaLucci.
5 posted on 02/23/2005 7:43:16 AM PST by NonValueAdded ("We're going to take things away from you on behalf of the common good" HRC 6/28/2004)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Napolitano is the Wolf-Man. He has to shave his face prior to his (too) many appearances on Fox TV.


6 posted on 02/23/2005 7:44:03 AM PST by pissant
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Of course, had Napolitano taken the few minutes necessary to read the indictment (which is freely available online), he might have learned that all of the conversations and actions that resulted in Stewart's conviction took place about two years or more before the post-9/11 regulation (which the, er, Judge, in any event, mischaracterizes). That is: before George W. Bush was president, before John Ashcroft was attorney general, and before 9/11 ever happened. This investigation was very ably conducted by, and took place under the auspices of incontestably proper regulations imposed by, the Clinton Justice Department.

Napolitano shuld be immediately fired by the FoxNews Channel for this fraudulent opinion piece.

7 posted on 02/23/2005 7:46:12 AM PST by montag813
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Of course, had Napolitano taken the few minutes necessary to read the indictment (which is freely available online), he might have learned that all of the conversations and actions that resulted in Stewart's conviction took place about two years or more before the post-9/11 regulation (which the, er, Judge, in any event, mischaracterizes). That is: before George W. Bush was president, before John Ashcroft was attorney general, and before 9/11 ever happened.

I've not been impressed with Judge Andrew Napolitano...finally, hopefully, someone with some power at Fox News will let his contract run out and get someone else to be the pundit for legal issues. Mark Levin, for instance?

8 posted on 02/23/2005 7:47:13 AM PST by SoFloFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: governsleastgovernsbest
This column is absolutely devastating to Napolitano's reputation.....

Agree totally. A complete and utter smackdown. I also agree that Napolitano seems like a nice enough guy, but he takes himself (and his legal opinions) waaaaay too seriously.

9 posted on 02/23/2005 7:48:55 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: governsleastgovernsbest

All agreed, although I will inform you that while the NJ judges are pathetically liberal, NJ has one of the finest judicial systems in the World. Eisenhower offered the U.S. Supreme Court to the judge who stayed in NJ instead to set up the system. It's modeled after the federal system so you have appointment instead of election. Pennsylvania by contrast is a corrupt zoo. Sadly, the courts are still asses because so liberal. But there is a tradition that half the judges are dems and half repubs, with the 1 seat majority going to whichever side is in power. But, alas, they are all liberal in any event.


10 posted on 02/23/2005 7:49:23 AM PST by Williams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: NonValueAdded
Your welcome..........was surprised it wasn't already posted.
As you say, game, set, match. :)
11 posted on 02/23/2005 7:50:01 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: SoFloFreeper

Napolitano made my head explode when he praised Michael Newdow for the public servive he is doing by challenging the Pledge.


12 posted on 02/23/2005 7:50:42 AM PST by massgopguy (massgopguy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Completely OT but Napolitano has the strangest hair line. Comes down within an inch of his eyebrows.


13 posted on 02/23/2005 7:51:02 AM PST by DManA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

It may not be apparent from the coverage, even in the ultra-left wing, old-timey rags, but the old school New York commies, socialists and anti-Americans are going bananas over Lynn Stewart's conviction. She is one of the ultra-left wing icons, almost of the stature that Joe Stalin used to seek her guidance, and the commies are outraged that she finally got caught. If we can put her away for 25 years, the country will be a better place.


14 posted on 02/23/2005 7:52:18 AM PST by Tacis ("John ("What SF-180?") Kerry - Still Shilling For Those Who Would Harm America!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
I agree. Napolitano, while an entertaining and amiable presence on Fox, is someone I used to look forward to listening to - That is until he started to spout some of the gibberish the article refers to.

His unstinting defense of the chaos unleashed by the misapplication and misuse of the rights conferred under the First Amendment and his railings against the imposition of reasonable (And, IMO, very necessary) restrictions on the ability dangerous convicted Felons to communicate with the outside world are, at the least, irresponsible.

15 posted on 02/23/2005 7:52:52 AM PST by drt1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kc2theline
Nice to get the full story instead of the talking head versions that opine about their "feelings".

Good point.........McCarthy so obviously knows of what he speaks, that the reader feels unusually informed upon reading his thoughts. Sad, isn't it?

16 posted on 02/23/2005 7:53:42 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

An attorney is not required to carry messages for their client. When an attorney becomes a participant in a criminal enterprise, they should be prosecuted.


17 posted on 02/23/2005 7:55:01 AM PST by popdonnelly
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

I kind of like the 'judge'. In this case, however, he's out of his realm of 'education, knowledge, and experience', i.e., he's practicing outside of his field, stretching his credentials. If I did that as an engineer, offered public opinions on engineering issues outside my area of expertise, I would be subject to censure and fine.


18 posted on 02/23/2005 7:55:59 AM PST by Real Cynic No More (Al-Jazeera is to the Iraqi War as CBS was to the Vietnam War.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: montag813

It will be interesting to see how/if Fox News reacts to this devastating piece by NRO.


19 posted on 02/23/2005 7:56:47 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Let's be brutally honest about Fox News here. They have a reputation for covering stories and hosting guests that the left-wing media shy away from, but the quality of their work is often shoddy at best -- and they are often prone to the kind of half-@ssed sensationalist "journalism" described in this article.

Heck, I'd love to say that I even care about it -- but I have steadfastly refused to watch Fox since the day they hired Geraldo Rivera Jerry Rivers.

20 posted on 02/23/2005 7:58:02 AM PST by Alberta's Child (I'm not expecting to grow flowers in the desert.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SoFloFreeper

That paragraph you highlighted is particularly shameful.........will Napolitano issue a correction of the record?


21 posted on 02/23/2005 7:59:01 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Williams

Thanks for the interesting insight on the NJ judicial system.

My highly negative impression of the NJ system was formed by its blatant flouting of the law in permitting Lautenberg to take the place on the ballot of the disgraced Robert Torricelli.


22 posted on 02/23/2005 8:00:10 AM PST by governsleastgovernsbest (Watching the Today Show since 2002 so you don't have to.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Alberta's Child
I would agree that Fox News is merely the "least of all evils", but until something
better comes along (and it WILL), I watch Fox News.
23 posted on 02/23/2005 8:04:44 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci; LibertyThug

I read that this morning, what a smackdown.

Napolitano has a book to sell, so he's very quick to judge anything and everything as an assault on the Constitution. I keep waiting for him to declare E.D. Hill's hair unconstitutional. Heck, I might even support that one...


24 posted on 02/23/2005 8:08:00 AM PST by Akira (Experience is a hard teacher, but fools will have no other.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tacis
If we can put her away for 25 years, the country will be a better place.

Yes, and that is precisely why the commies are squealing so loudly..............
they don't WANT the country to be a better place.
I didn't see it, but heard that Stewert cried like a baby after being convicted.
It made me think that there were many reasons that the left not only
wanted Gore to win in 2000,.............they NEEDED him to win.
Thank GOD for big favors.

25 posted on 02/23/2005 8:12:57 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Akira
Napolitano has a book to sell, so he's very quick to judge anything and everything as an assault on the Constitution. I keep waiting for him to declare E.D. Hill's hair unconstitutional. Heck, I might even support that one...

ROFL!! It's true.....and McCarthy nailed him brilliantly for it.
By (erroniously) using the Stewert conviction to prop up the premise of his book,
the good "Judge" made an ass of himself.

26 posted on 02/23/2005 8:17:11 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Alberta's Child
"But I have steadfastly refused to watch Fox since the day they hired Geraldo Rivera Jerry Rivers.

He IS a charlatan 'journalist' isn't he. I had decided to give him the benefit of the doubt and had endured his over-hyped irrelevancies until the other day.

On that day he finally pulled the Kimono wide open and had Amarosa (The incompetent, devious, Race baiting failure who appeared on the equally inane 'Apprentice' Reality Show) as his 'Expert' commentator on - Racism and Micheal Jackson's trial - A double dose of ignorance and depravity. That was it for me. I keep the clicker handy just in case they sneak him in at some unexpected point.

27 posted on 02/23/2005 8:17:11 AM PST by drt1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

I said 2 weeks ago he really showed himself to be an a-s
with that article.
Traffic court judge maybe


28 posted on 02/23/2005 8:19:39 AM PST by italianquaker (CATHOLIC AND I VOTE BUSH=MANDATE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

Anything I need to know, I learn on FreeRepublic.


29 posted on 02/23/2005 8:21:34 AM PST by Alberta's Child (I'm not expecting to grow flowers in the desert.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: italianquaker
Traffic court judge maybe....

Ouch!

30 posted on 02/23/2005 8:22:15 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Thanks for this post! I read Napalitano's Lynne Stewart "oped" last week and even my slow brain was wondering how John Ashcroft could have violated so many rights when the blind shiek's trial was over years before Ashcroft was AG.

I know nothing about legal issues but everytime I hear Napolitano I get the feeling he's an ignorant windbag.It's so great to have my gut feeling confirmed by genuine smart guy Andrew McCArthy!

31 posted on 02/23/2005 9:23:20 AM PST by Blumtoon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blumtoon

My pleasure. ;)


32 posted on 02/23/2005 10:22:27 AM PST by MamaLucci (Libs, want answers on 911? Ask Clinton why he met with Monica more than with his CIA director.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Any bests as to how long it tkes for Bill O'MeMeMe! to find a reason to make some snarky comments about McCarthy? O'BuyMyStuff and Napolitano are buds, and Mr. "Who's Looking To Get Money From You" will jump to defend Napolitano if it means he'll need to find another guest host for his radio program.
33 posted on 02/23/2005 10:25:32 AM PST by Jokelahoma (Animal testing is a bad idea. They get all nervous and give wrong answers.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jokelahoma
"bests" should read "bets", of course. I hate laptop keyboards.
34 posted on 02/23/2005 10:26:19 AM PST by Jokelahoma (Animal testing is a bad idea. They get all nervous and give wrong answers.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci
Of course, had Napolitano taken the few minutes necessary to read the indictment (which is freely available online), he might have learned that all of the conversations and actions that resulted in Stewart's conviction took place about two years or more before the post-9/11 regulation (which the, er, Judge, in any event, mischaracterizes). That is: before George W. Bush was president, before John Ashcroft was attorney general, and before 9/11 ever happened. This investigation was very ably conducted by, and took place under the auspices of incontestably proper regulations imposed by, the Clinton Justice Department.

SMACK! I've found myself wanting to throw a sock at the TV many times when "Judge" Napolitano was bloviating about some constitutional issue. Good to see Mr. McCarthy take him to the woodshed.

35 posted on 02/23/2005 10:47:36 AM PST by PogySailor
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: governsleastgovernsbest

As I said, they are still liberal and that is the problem. There is also corruption and incompetence, but NJ has a pretty strong system in place and judges do get reprimanded or removed for misconduct. It'sa good system similar to the federal judiciary, and obviously there are problems at the federal level at well. But there is a lot to be said for a professional judiciary as opposed to the zoo atmosphere existing in many state courts.


36 posted on 02/23/2005 10:54:14 AM PST by Williams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: governsleastgovernsbest

Well .. actually, he is entitled to be called judge, just as former presidents are entitled to be called Mr. President, or as former Ambassadors are allowed to be called Mr. Ambassador.

I don't object to that part. I've just noticed a distinct dislike for Ashcroft and the Patriot Act.

I remember a private investigator (Mark Furman) who said of the Patriot Act that all it did was allow police units to do what private investigators had been able to do for years. While I'm not a big fan of Furman's, he went on to explain some of the things which police could now do which Mark said he has always been allowed to do - so Mark didn't think the Patriot Act was such a big deal.

It's like anything else which is put in front of you - it's up to YOU to choose if you will accept it or not. I rarely agree with the "Judge" - but that doesn't mean everything he says is an incorrect interrpretation of the law.

But .. FOX also employs Bob Beckel who hired a whore and brought her into his own home (while his wife was away). FOX also employs Robert Frost, a Texas representative who is hell bent on destroying Tom DeLay - and Frost's own aide was seen on video going into DeLay's office and STEALING a copy of DeLay's redistricting plan. I've been yelling at FOX over these 2 for months.


37 posted on 02/23/2005 11:05:50 AM PST by CyberAnt (Pres. Bush: "Self-government relies, in the end, on the governing of the self.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci

I am just tired of "Judge" Napolitano bashing John Ashcroft. Every chance he gets.


38 posted on 02/23/2005 11:23:14 AM PST by PatriotGirl827 (Member of the Vast Right Wing Pajama Party)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MamaLucci; nothingnew; Ghost of Philip Marlowe; jan in Colorado
"The Times ought to be embarrassed. Fox News ought to be more embarrassed."

Good for Andrew McCarthy. It's about time that a seasoned journalist took "the Judge-at-Fox" to task. I've consistently disagreed with this judge's interpretations on legal matters. In my opinion, he really isn't all that bright, and as this article says, he is an embarrassment to Fox News. "Senior Judicial Analyst," - my eye. He should be let go. He is actually so off the mark, that he's somewhat comical. I feel like muttering, "Here come da judge" every time he appears on any of the many shows at Fox where they showcase this inferior legal mind.

As some of you have pointed out, he is affable enough, but he's a cocky little fellow who thinks he's "somethin' else" in the lofty pantheon of legal minds! He exudes an aura of oddly amiable, avuncular omniscience with respect to the law, when his views are based upon insufficient familiarity with their complexities, or even their basic foundation. Some retooling is needed over at Fox.

I say: "Let's draft Mark Levin!" I'm all for that!

Char :)

39 posted on 02/23/2005 11:56:16 AM PST by CHARLITE (glad to see lib Dem rats on sinking ship, unable to disembark)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Victoria Delsoul

Interesting legal analysis ping.


40 posted on 02/23/2005 5:15:32 PM PST by Alberta's Child (I'm not expecting to grow flowers in the desert.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pissant
Napolitano is the Wolf-Man. He has to shave his face prior to his (too) many appearances on Fox TV.

He reminds me of Eddy Munster.

41 posted on 02/25/2005 11:57:33 AM PST by sydbas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

Comment #42 Removed by Moderator

Comment #43 Removed by Moderator

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson