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Happy Reformation Day
Esler.org ^ | October 31, 2012 | Ted

Posted on 10/31/2012 2:40:55 PM PDT by Alex Murphy

1522 copy of the 95 Theses

The 95 Theses

On this day in 1517 a relatively unknown German monk pounded a proclamation of sorts onto a church door in Wittenburg, Germany. In the empty spiritual bucket created by a corrupt Catholic Church hierarchy and alongside a godless Renaissance, Luther’s 95 Theses represented renewal. They were a call back to personal and corporate holiness that resounded well past the door frames of the church.

There are six attributes common to all movements and we can easily see them in Luther’s Reformation. For those of us bent on seeing movements of transformation the lessons are worth reviewing.

Affinity group recruitment: Luther’s translation of the Bible into the vernacular language of the common man made it possible for the message to be passed from person to person. The printing press fueled the writings of Luther and the message quickly spread from town to village to city. Originally, Luther has posted his 95 Theses in Latin. Others translated and printed them into pamphlets and they were passed hand to hand across the European continent.

Common acts of commitment: The Catholic Church, in the early 1550s, demanded not only spiritual obedience but was a mark of citizenship. The act of separating oneself from the Church was an act of disloyalty to the European order. It was a radical act but one that cemented the newly forming “Protesting Church” into what sociologist call a “densely packed social network.” Benjamin Franklin captured what these types of “no return” acts do for a movement at the signing of the American Declaration of Independence: “We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.”

Opposition (real or perceived): Luther did not intend to abolish the Catholic Church but to reform it. his wine, however, was too new for the old wineskins and the Church turned on its monk, seeking to imprison him and stop his criticisms. This gave way to the sort of persecution that feeds the flames of rapidly growing movements.

Retro-revolutionary ideology: Luther’s message was a reformer’s message. Rarely do movements take hold and flourish when their ideology completely replaces a group’s foundational understandings. Jesus was thoroughly Jewish (retro) yet his message demolished the status quo (revolutionary). Luther similarly embraced the truths of the Bible while challenging the Church’s grip on power.

Network structures: The Reformation would eventually coalesce into a number of strategic and important “centers” of activity. Calvin’s Zurich is perhaps the most important one. However, the message of opposition to the centralized Catholic Church produced a host of leaders who each battled for their perspective of the church. This inevitably gave way to a healthy fragmentation and the sharing of leadership among a wide array of movement leaders.

Set of favorable circumstances: There are few eras that have been as ripe for change as the 1500s. Luther walked into a century that would give us Da Vinci, Galileo, the first globe, incredible intercontinental adventures, flush toilets, and bottled beer. The list goes on and on! The religious culture of Western Europe had become a fusion of folk mysticism blended with Catholicism. People were searching for more substantial answers to the problems of life and Luther’s Bible translation was ready to fill that void.

One could argue that the Reformation has affected global Christianity more than any other historical event since the New Testament era. I find it telling that today we celebrate Halloween, a part of that mystical folk religion of Europe, on this day rather than Luther’s unknowing act of bravery. Instead of teaching our children to say “trick or treat” perhaps they should learn to say, “Happy Reformation Day.”

Perhaps the time is ripe for a new movement.


TOPICS: Catholic; History; Mainline Protestant
KEYWORDS: reformationday
The Catholic Church, in the early 1550s, demanded not only spiritual obedience but was a mark of citizenship. The act of separating oneself from the Church was an act of disloyalty to the European order. It was a radical act but one that cemented the newly forming “Protesting Church” into what sociologist call a “densely packed social network.” Benjamin Franklin captured what these types of “no return” acts do for a movement at the signing of the American Declaration of Independence: “We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately”....

....There are few eras that have been as ripe for change as the 1500s. Luther walked into a century that would give us Da Vinci, Galileo, the first globe, incredible intercontinental adventures, flush toilets, and bottled beer. The list goes on and on! The religious culture of Western Europe had become a fusion of folk mysticism blended with Catholicism. People were searching for more substantial answers to the problems of life and Luther’s Bible translation was ready to fill that void.

One could argue that the Reformation has affected global Christianity more than any other historical event since the New Testament era. I find it telling that today we celebrate Halloween, a part of that mystical folk religion of Europe, on this day rather than Luther’s unknowing act of bravery. Instead of teaching our children to say “trick or treat” perhaps they should learn to say, “Happy Reformation Day.”

1 posted on 10/31/2012 2:40:55 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy

“Reformation Day” is not in my Bible.


2 posted on 10/31/2012 2:53:05 PM PDT by Campion ("Social justice" begins in the womb)
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To: Alex Murphy
It occured to me that what Islam is missing is a “Martin Luther”. The Reformation Movement brought much needed change to a monolithic religion and opened discussion about the role of the church.
3 posted on 10/31/2012 3:09:26 PM PDT by Makana
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To: Alex Murphy

“...a relatively unknown German monk pounded a proclamation of sorts onto a church door in Wittenburg, Germany.”

I never heard of Reformation Day before you started posting, but now that you remind me, you Lutherans owe us Catholics for a new church door.


4 posted on 10/31/2012 3:30:57 PM PDT by Owl558 ("Those who remember George Satayana are doomed to repeat him")
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To: Campion

Neither is “Christmas” or “Easter.”


5 posted on 10/31/2012 3:32:50 PM PDT by liege (I'll pay more for tomatoes...or lettuce.)
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To: Makana
It occured to me that what Islam is missing is a “Martin Luther”. The Reformation Movement brought much needed change to a monolithic religion and opened discussion about the role of the church.

There have been many Islamic Martin Luthers


6 posted on 10/31/2012 3:33:59 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: Owl558
I never heard of Reformation Day before you started posting, but now that you remind me, you Lutherans owe us Catholics for a new church door.


7 posted on 10/31/2012 3:45:52 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy

Too bad he didn’t look to the East. Many of his complaints would have been answered by Orthodoxy. However, transubstantiation would have been one sticky wicket.


8 posted on 10/31/2012 3:53:58 PM PDT by firebasecody (Orthodoxy, proclaiming the Truth since AD 33)
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To: liege; Campion

Nor is pope. The word reverend is mentioned once but only in reference to God.


9 posted on 10/31/2012 3:55:02 PM PDT by BipolarBob (Willie Stark for president.)
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To: Alex Murphy

Eventually, he would come to fame as part of a Paul McCartney song (along with Bill and Dawn/Don).


10 posted on 10/31/2012 3:56:03 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (We can’t just leave it (food choice) up to the parents. -- moochele obozo 2/12/2012 (cnsnews))
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To: GraceG

Luther, at least to my knowledge, never killed anybody.


11 posted on 10/31/2012 4:07:17 PM PDT by Jacob Kell
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To: Jacob Kell

Did he at least sell indulgences to finance his ministry?


12 posted on 10/31/2012 4:39:12 PM PDT by BipolarBob (Willie Stark for president.)
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To: Owl558

***you Lutherans owe us Catholics for a new church door.***

And you will have it for sale on E-Bay before the new door has it’s hinge pins driven in! ;-D


13 posted on 10/31/2012 5:27:40 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
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To: firebasecody

***Too bad he didn’t look to the East. Many of his complaints would have been answered by Orthodoxy.***

I remember reading here on FR many years ago that Luther DID try to contact the Patriarch of Constantinople several times.

As for transubstantiation, I believe Lutherans do believe in it.


14 posted on 10/31/2012 5:29:30 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar
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To: Jacob Kell

Luther, at least to my knowledge, never killed anybody.

I was referring tot he poor guy who was missing his body...

Lot of Islamic Luthers have been missing wither their heads or their bodies....


15 posted on 10/31/2012 5:39:46 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

The Lutheran view of communion is consubstantiation.

http://www.gotquestions.org/consubstantiation.html


16 posted on 10/31/2012 6:01:12 PM PDT by ReformationFan
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To: ReformationFan; Ruy Dias de Bivar; firebasecody
Not quite right, we call it the Doctrine of the Real Presence:
"Luther's position (particularly as developed by subsequent Lutheranism) is referred to as a "real physical presence" of Christ in the elements. The bread is still bread, but it is also truly the body of Christ. And while the wine does not lose its "wine-ness", it is very much the actual blood of Christ. Luther found Jesus' words "This is my body" (Hoc est corpus meum) as a mandate for such an understanding. This view is often conflated with consubstantiation, which is a philosophical rather than a theological view."
17 posted on 10/31/2012 6:50:43 PM PDT by stayathomemom (Beware of kittens modifying your posts.)
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To: GraceG

I don’t understand the significance of the artwork - sword slicing off head.


18 posted on 10/31/2012 7:18:32 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: GraceG

I don’t understand the significance of the artwork - sword slicing off head.


19 posted on 10/31/2012 7:19:07 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: Alex Murphy
Perhaps the time is ripe for a new movement.

Yup -- the problem is the motto "semper reformanda" -- always reforming. There are new directions being found, new interpretations everyday.

Each new bunch of Reformatters reformats the old.

  1. You have the first generation namely Lutheran sticking close to orthodoxy with the Lutherans holding to the True Presence in the Eucharist, to Baptismal regeneration etc.
  2. Generation 2: Then you have the Calvin-Zwingli crowd rejecting these two as well as other aspects of orthodoxy
  3. Generation 3: Knox and the Anglican compromise
  4. Generation 4: The Unitarians like Michael Servetus who went from being Catholic to Lutheran to Reformed to denying the Trinity.
  5. Generation 5: the Baptists who now rejected infant baptism (quite unlike their namesakes the Anabaptists (now called Mennonites)) and said that there was a great Apostasy in the first centuries of Christendom (Gen 1-3 took later centuries as the dates of their "Great Apostasy")
  6. Generation 6: the Restorationists at the Great Awakening, like
    • The Millerites, to become the Seventh DayAdventists -- with Ellen G White saying that Jesus was the same as the Archangel Michael and that Satan woudl take the sins of the world at the end of time and other beauties. They came up with their own version of the Bible
    • The Unitarians and Universalists -- reborn and reinvigorated by this reformatting, they tossed out the Trinity and eventually they end up as they are today where they believe in nothing
    • Jehovah's Witnesses: they tossed out the Trinity too and came up with their own version of the Bible
    • The Mormons: they took the Trinity and made it three gods. They too came up with their own version of the Bible
  7. Generation 7: the Orthodo Presbyterian C, the FourSquare Ahoy! Pentecostalists, the Raelians, the Branch Davidians, the Creflo-Dollar crowd, the Jesse Dupantis (I went to visit Jesus in heaven and comforted Him) etc -- one step further beyond generation 6
  8. Generation 8: ... any one of the new sects formed since 1990

20 posted on 11/01/2012 12:21:59 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Alex Murphy

Of course, there’s a lot of change happening. Next week the North-Western Evangelical Bible-Reformed branch of PresbyMennonCongregationalutherAdventipentecostathism is due to split into the Central-North-Western Evangelical Bible-Reformed branch of PresbyMennonCongregationalutherAdventipentecostathism and the Central-Southern-North-Western Evangelical Bible-Reformed branch of PresbyMennonCongregationalutherAdventipentecostathism, but this is good driven as there as a dispute in the Congregation on matters of doctrine, Bobama thought that he should be Preach-pasto-Prophet Elder on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and alternate Sundays while Michelle thought that she should be that — as she had yoga-pilates-kickboxing class on Thursdays.


21 posted on 11/01/2012 12:22:21 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Makana; Campion; Owl558; GraceG; Jacob Kell
Actually, Islam has had its reformer - "Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab", who in 1740 reformed Islam, attacking what he believed were movement away from the "original principles". So Wahhabism condemned priests, scholarship and said that Moslems should return to the islamic beliefs that:
  1. Human beings have no free will
  2. Allah controls everything and those who are not part of the "elect" are foreordained to damnation
  3. That salvation to the levels of heaven are limited to those predestined to salvation by being part of the elect, the "ummah"
  4. That Allah's will is irresistible
  5. that those chosen will stay true to the faith -- otherwise they die

Wahab went against the 1000 year agreed interpretation of the Koran, stating that folks should be "sola scriptura" -- in the Islamic sense, only the Koran, ignoring the centuries of beliefs and consensus of centuries

This reforming movement by the Wahabbis is spreading thanks to the "Wahabbi work ethic or rather Saudi money ethic" through the Taliban, Pakistan, etc.

The aim, as you see among the Taliban etc. is to return to the "Early Moslems" -- of course Luther, coming from orthodoxy was no where in personality comparable to Wahabb, but note -- your question was about refroming in Islam and that's already happenned.

22 posted on 11/01/2012 12:45:25 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Ciexyz

Not sure, but it’s a Caravaggio. Caravaggio is incredibly fantastic


23 posted on 11/01/2012 12:49:29 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Ciexyz
Not sure, but it's a Caravaggio. Caravaggio is incredibly fantastic

Exquisite.

I remember seeing this at the Uffizi or in the Churches in Rome. Exquisite

24 posted on 11/01/2012 12:53:38 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: BipolarBob
There is an excellent post by HapaxLegamenon


To: Alex Murphy
To my Protestant brothers: Do you agree with the following theses that Luther nailed to the Church door:

The pope has neither the will nor the power to remit any penalties beyond those imposed either at his own discretion or by canon law.

The pope himself cannot remit guilt, but only declare and confirm that it has been remitted by God; or, at most, he can remit it in cases reserved to his discretion. Except for these cases, the guilt remains untouched.

God never remits guilt to anyone without, at the same time, making him humbly submissive to the priest, His representative.

Accordingly, the Holy Spirit, acting in the person of the pope, manifests grace to us, by the fact that the papal regulations always cease to apply at death, or in any hard case. It is a wrongful act, due to ignorance, when priests retain the canonical penalties on the dead in purgatory.

Defective piety or love in a dying person is necessarily accompanied by great fear, which is greatest where the piety or love is least. This fear or horror is sufficient in itself, whatever else might be said, to constitute the pain of purgatory, since it approaches very closely to the horror of despair. There seems to be the same difference between hell, purgatory, and heaven as between despair, uncertainty, and assurance.

Of a truth, the pains of souls in purgatory ought to be abated, and charity ought to be proportionately increased.

The same power as the pope exercises in general over purgatory is exercised in particular by every single bishop in his bishopric and priest in his parish.

The pope does excellently when he grants remission to the souls in purgatory on account of intercessions made on their behalf.

Yet the pope's remission and dispensation are in no way to be despised, for, as already said, they proclaim the divine remission.

Papal indulgences should only be preached with caution.

Christians should be taught that they purchase indulgences voluntarily, and are not under obligation to do so.

Christians should be taught that the pope's indulgences are useful only if one does not rely on them, but most harmful if one loses the fear of God through them.

The treasures of the church, out of which the pope dispenses indulgences, are not sufficiently spoken of or known among the people of Christ.

That these treasures are not temporal are clear from the fact that many of the merchants do not grant them freely, but only collect them.

Nor are they the merits of Christ and the saints, because, even apart from the pope, these merits are always working grace in the inner man, and working the cross, death, and hell in the outer man.

On the other hand, the treasure of indulgences is most acceptable, for it makes the last to be the first.

Bishops and curates, in duty bound, must receive the commissaries of the papal indulgences with all reverence. But they are under a much greater obligation to watch closely and attend carefully lest these men preach their own fancies instead of what the pope commissioned.

Let him be anathema and accursed who denies the apostolic character of the indulgences.

If therefore, indulgences were preached in accordance with the spirit and mind of the pope, all these difficulties would be easily overcome, and indeed, cease to exist.

Christians should be exhorted to be zealous to follow Christ, their Head, through penalties, deaths, and hells. And let them thus be more confident of entering heaven through many tribulations rather than through a false assurance of peace

These are just some of the 95 theses. All of the above is Catholic Doctrine. Do Protestants celebrating this day agree with them???

6 posted on 10/31/2012 7:32:54 PM PDT by HapaxLegamenon

25 posted on 11/01/2012 1:02:10 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: stayathomemom

Please, do expand the bolded part. I am interested.


26 posted on 11/01/2012 6:26:08 AM PDT by firebasecody (Orthodoxy, proclaiming the Truth since AD 33)
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To: firebasecody
I had never heard the term 'consubstantiation' before. I checked the definition which stated that it was the belief that the bread and wine were there physically and the body and blood were there spiritually. The Lutheran belief is that the bread and wine are there physically as well as the body and blood. Although we can only see the bread and wine, we believe that it is the body and blood because Christ said, "This is my body, this is my blood."
If you read the short wikipoedia articles on Consubstantiation, Sacrimental Union, and Real Presence, it may clarify this.
27 posted on 11/01/2012 9:13:25 AM PDT by stayathomemom (Beware of kittens modifying your posts.)
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To: stayathomemom

Well, the more I read, the more confused. Clearly Christ said the words.I like to leave it as one of the mysteries of the Church. I get less head spin that way.


28 posted on 11/01/2012 3:00:58 PM PDT by firebasecody (Orthodoxy, proclaiming the Truth since AD 33)
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To: firebasecody

I guess there are some things that we humans cannot wrap our heads around. One of those being how something that is obviously bread and wine can also be the body and blood of Christ in more than just a spiritual way, or because we believe it is or don’t believe it is.


29 posted on 11/01/2012 3:41:30 PM PDT by stayathomemom (Beware of kittens modifying your posts.)
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