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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 09-16-12, Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 09-16-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 09/15/2012 9:16:06 PM PDT by Salvation

September 16, 2012

Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Is 50:5-9a

The Lord GOD opens my ear that I may hear;
and I have not rebelled,
have not turned back.
I gave my back to those who beat me,
my cheeks to those who plucked my beard;
my face I did not shield
from buffets and spitting.

The Lord GOD is my help,
therefore I am not disgraced;
I have set my face like flint,
knowing that I shall not be put to shame.
He is near who upholds my right;
if anyone wishes to oppose me,
let us appear together.
Who disputes my right?
Let that man confront me.
See, the Lord GOD is my help;
who will prove me wrong?

Responsorial Psalm Ps 114:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9

R. (9) I will walk before the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.
I love the LORD because he has heard
my voice in supplication,
Because he has inclined his ear to me
the day I called.
R. I will walk before the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.
The cords of death encompassed me;
the snares of the netherworld seized upon me;
I fell into distress and sorrow,
And I called upon the name of the LORD,
"O LORD, save my life!"
R. I will walk before the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Gracious is the LORD and just;
yes, our God is merciful.
The LORD keeps the little ones;
I was brought low, and he saved me.
R. I will walk before the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.
For he has freed my soul from death,
my eyes from tears, my feet from stumbling.
I shall walk before the Lord
in the land of the living.
R. I will walk before the Lord, in the land of the living.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 2 Jas 2:14-18

What good is it, my brothers and sisters,
if someone says he has faith but does not have works?
Can that faith save him?
If a brother or sister has nothing to wear
and has no food for the day,
and one of you says to them,
"Go in peace, keep warm, and eat well, "
but you do not give them the necessities of the body,
what good is it?
So also faith of itself,
if it does not have works, is dead.

Indeed someone might say,
"You have faith and I have works."
Demonstrate your faith to me without works,
and I will demonstrate my faith to you from my works.

Gospel Mk 8:27-35

Jesus and his disciples set out
for the villages of Caesarea Philippi.
Along the way he asked his disciples,
"Who do people say that I am?"
They said in reply,
"John the Baptist, others Elijah,
still others one of the prophets."
And he asked them,
"But who do you say that I am?"
Peter said to him in reply,
"You are the Christ."
Then he warned them not to tell anyone about him.

He began to teach them
that the Son of Man must suffer greatly
and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes,
and be killed, and rise after three days.
He spoke this openly.
Then Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.
At this he turned around and, looking at his disciples,
rebuked Peter and said, "Get behind me, Satan.
You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do."

He summoned the crowd with his disciples and said to them,
"Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself,
take up his cross, and follow me.
For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it,
but whoever loses his life for my sake
and that of the gospel will save it."


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 09/15/2012 9:16:21 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 09/15/2012 9:18:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Isaiah 50:4-9a

Third Song of the Servant of the Lord


[4] The Lord God has given me
the tongue of those who are taught;
that I may know how to sustain with a word
him that is weary.
Morning by morning he wakens,
he wakens my ear to hear as those who are taught.
[5] The Lord God has opened my ear,
and I was not rebellious,
I turned not backward.
[6] I gave my back to the smiters,
and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard;
I hid not my face from shame and spitting.

[7] For the Lord God helps me;
therefore I have not been confounded;
therefore I have set my face like a flint,
and I know that I shall not be put to shame;
[8] he who vindicates me is near.
Who will contend with me?
Let us stand up together.
Who is my adversary?
Let him come near me.
[9] Behold, the Lord God helps me;
who will declare me guilty?

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

50:4-9. The second song dealt with the servant’s mission (cf. 49:6); the third song
focuses on the servant himself. The term “servant” as such does not appear here,
and therefore some commentators read the passage as being a description of a
prophet and not part of the songs. Still, the context (cf. 50:10) does suggest that
the protagonist is the servant. The poem is neatly constructed in three stanzas,
each beginning with the words, “The Lord God” (vv. 4, 5, 7), and it has a conclu-
sion containing that same wording (v. 9). The first stanza emphasizes the ser-
vant’s docility to the word of God; that is, he is not depicted as a self-taught tea-
cher with original ideas, but as an obedient disciple. The second (vv. 5-6) speaks
of the suffering that that docility has brought him, without his uttering a word of
complaint. The third (vv. 7-8) shows how determined the servant is: if he suffers
in silence, it is not out of cowardice but because God helps him and makes him
stronger than his persecutors. The conclusion (v. 9) is like the verdict of a trial:
when all is said and done, the servant will stand tall, and all his ene- mies will be
struck down.

The evangelists saw the words of this song as finding fulfillment in Jesus — es-
pecially what the song has to say about the suffering and silent fortitude of the
servant. The Gospel of John, for example, quotes Nicodemus’ acknowledgment
of Christ’s wisdom: “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God; for
no one can do these signs that you do, unless God is with him” (Jn 3:21). But
the description of the servant’s sufferings was the part that most impressed the
early Christians; that part of the song was recalled when they meditated on the
passion of Jesus and how “they spat in his face; and struck him; and some
slapped him” (Mt 26:67) and later how the Roman soldiers “spat upon him, and
took the reed and struck him on the head” (Mt 27:30; cf. also Mk 15:19; Jn 19:3).
St Paul refers to v. 9 when applying to Christ Jesus the role of intercessor on be-
half of the elect in the suit pressed constantly against them by the enemies of
the soul: “Who shall bring any charge against God’s elect?” (Rom 8:33).

St Jerome sees the servant’s docility as a reference to Christ: “His self-discipline
and wisdom enabled him to communicate to us the knowledge of the Father. And
he was obedient onto death, death on the cross; he offered his body to the blows
they struck, his shoulders to the lash; and though he was wounded on the chest
and on his face, he did not try to turn away and escape their violence” (”Commen-
tarii In Isaiam”, 50, 4). This passage is used in the liturgy of Palm Sunday (along
with Psalm 22 and St Paul’s hymn in the Letter to the Philippians 2:6-11), before
the reading of our Lord’s passion.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 09/15/2012 9:20:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: James 2:14-18

Faith Without Good Works Is Dead


[14] What does it profit, my brethren, if a man says he has faith but has not
works? Can this faith save him? [15] If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack
of daily food, [16] and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and
filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit?
[17] So faith, by itself, if it has no works, is dead.

[18] But some one will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your
faith apart from your works, and I by my works will show you my faith. [19] You
believe that God is one; you do well. Even the demons believe—and shudder.

********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

14-26. This passage forms the core of the letter. The sapiential method (often
used in the Old Testament) and pedagogical style of the passage help to engrave
the message on the readers’ minds: unless faith is accompanied by works, it is
barren, dead. This basic message, with different variances, is stated up to five
times (verses 14, 17, 18, 20, 26), in a cyclical, repetitive way.

The initial rhetorical question (verse 14) and the simple, vivid example of a person
who is content with giving good advice to someone in urgent need of the bare es-
sentials (verses 15-16), catch the disciples’ attention and predispose them to ac-
cept the core message, which is couched in the form of a sapiential maxim
(verse 17).

The narrative retains its conventional tone, with a series of questions; we are
given three examples of faith: firstly (a negative example), the faith of demons,
which is of no avail (verses 18-19); contrasting with this, the faith of Abraham,
the model and father of believers (verses 20-23); and finally, the faith of a sinner
whose actions won her salvation, Rabah, the prostitute (verses 24-25). The last
sentence once again repeats the essential idea: “faith apart from works is dead”
(verse 26).

14. This teaching is perfectly in line with that of the Master: “Not every one who
says to Me, `Lord, Lord’, shall enter the Kingdom of Heaven, but he who does
the will of My Father who is in Heaven” (Matthew 7:21).

A faith without deeds cannot obtain salvation: “Even though incorporated into the
Church, one who does not however persevere in charity is not saved. He remains
indeed in the bosom of the Church, but `in body’ not `in heart’. All children of the
Church should nevertheless remember that their exalted condition results not
from their own merits but from the grace of Christ. If they fail to respond in
thought, word, and deed to that grace, not only shall they not be saved, but they
shall be the more severely judged” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 14).

In the Christian life, therefore, there needs to be complete consistency between
the faith we profess and the deeds we do. “Unity of life”, one of the key features
of the spirituality of Opus Dei, tries to counter the danger of people leading a dou-
ble life, “on the one hand, an inner life, a life related to God; and on the other, as
something separate and distinct, their professional, social and family lives, made
up of small earthly realities [...]. There is only one life, made of flesh and spirit.
And it is that life which has to become, in both body and soul, holy and filled with
God: we discover the invisible God in the most visible and material things” (St. J.
Escriva, “In Love with the Church”, 52).

15-16. This very graphic example is similar to that in the First Letter of St. John:
“If any one has the world’s goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his
heart against him, how does God’s love abide in him?” (1 John 3:17); and the
conclusion is also along the same lines: “Little children, let us not love in word
or speech but in deed and in truth” (1 John 3:18). St. Paul gives the same tea-
ching: “the Kingdom of God does not consist in talk but in power” (1 Corinthians
4:20). Actions, works, measure the genuineness of the Christian life; they show
whether our faith and charity are real.

Almsgiving, for example, so often praised and recommended in Scripture (cf.,
e.g., Deuteronomy 15:11; Tobias 4:7-11; Luke 12:33; Acts 9:36; 2 Corinthians 8:
9), is very often a duty. Christ “will count a kindness done or refused to the poor
as done or refused to Himself [...]. Whoever has received from the divine bounty
a large share of temporal blessings whether they be external or material, or gifts
of the mind, has received them for the purpose of using them for the perfecting
of his own nature, and, at the same time, that he may employ them, as the ste-
ward of God’s providence, for the benefit of others” (Leo XIII, “Rerum Novarum”,
24).

17. As well as involving firm adherence to revealed truth, faith must influence a
Christian’s ordinary life and be a standard against which he measures his con-
duct. When one’s works are not in accordance with one’s beliefs, then one’s
faith is dead.

Christian teaching also describes as “dead faith” the faith of a person in mortal
sin: because he is not in the grace of God he does not have charity, which is as
it were the soul of all the other virtues. “Faith without hope and charity neither
perfectly unites a man with Christ nor makes him a living member of His body.
Therefore it is said most truly that `faith apart from works is dead’ (James 2:17ff)
and useless” (Council of Trent, “De Iustificatione”, 7).

18. The Apostle makes it crystal clear that faith without work makes no sense at
all. “The truth of faith includes not only inner belief, but also outward profession,
which is expressed not only by declaration of one’s belief, but also by the actions
by which a person shows that he has faith” (St. Thomas, “Summa Theologiae”,
II-II, q. 124, a. 5).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 09/15/2012 9:21:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 8:27-35

Peter’s Profession of Faith


[27] And Jesus went on with His disciples, to the villages of Caesarea Philippi;
and on the way He asked His disciples, “Who do men say that I am?” [28] And
they told Him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others one of the
prophets.” [29] And He asked them, “But who do you say I am?” Peter answered
Him, “You are the Christ.” [30] And He charged them to tell no one about Him.

Jesus Foretells His Passion and Resurrection. Christian Renunciation


[31] And He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things,
and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed,
and after three days rise again. [32] And He said this plainly. And Peter took Him,
and began to rebuke Him. [33] But turning and seeing His disciples, He rebuked
Peter, and said, “Get behind Me, Satan! For you are not on the side of God, but
of men.”

[34] And he called to him the multitude with his disciples, and said to them, “If
any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and
follow me. [35] For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses
his life for my sake and the gospel’s will save it.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

29. Peter’s profession of faith is reported here in a shorter form than in Matthew
16:18-19. Peter seems to go no further than say that Jesus is the Christ, the
Messiah. Eusebius of Caesarea, in the fourth century, explains the Evangelist’s
reserve by the fact that he was the interpreter of St. Peter, who omitted from his
preaching anything which might appear to be self-praise. The Holy Spirit, when
inspiring St. Mark, wanted the Gospel to reflect the preaching of the prince of
the Apostles, leaving it to other evangelists to fill out certain important details to
do with the episode of the confession of Peter.

The sketchiness of the narrative still show Peter’s role quite clearly: he is the
first to come forward affirming the messiahship of Jesus. Our Lord’s question,
“But who do you say that I am?”, shows what Jesus is asking the Apostles for
— not an opinion, more or less favorable, but firm faith. It is St. Peter who ex-
presses this faith (cf. note on Matthew 16:13-20).

31-33. This is the first occasion when Jesus tells His disciples about the suffe-
rings and death He must undergo. He does it twice more, later on (cf. Mark 9:31
and 10:32). The Apostles are surprised, because they cannot and do not want
to understand why the Master should have to suffer and die, much less that He
should be so treated “by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes.” But
Peter, with his usual spontaneity, immediately begins to protest. And Jesus re-
plies to him using the same words as He addressed the devil when he tempted
Him (cf. Matthew 4:10); He wants to affirm, once again, that His mission is spi-
ritual, not earthly, and that therefore it cannot be understood by using mere hu-
man criteria: it is governed by God’s designs, which were that Jesus should re-
deem us through His passion and death. So too, for a Christian, suffering, united
with Christ, is also a means of salvation.

34. When Jesus said “If any man would come after me ...”, he was well aware
that in fulfilling his mission he would be brought to death on a cross; this is why
he speaks clearly about his passion (vv:31-32). The Christian life, lived as it
should be lived, with all its demands, is also a cross which one has to carry,
following Christ.

Jesus’ words, which must have seemed extreme to his listeners, indicate the
standard he requires his followers to live up to. He does not ask for short-lived
enthusiasm or occasional dedication; he asks everyone to renounce himself, to
take up his cross and follow him. For the goal he sets men is eternal life. This
whole Gospel passage has to do with man’s eternal destiny. The present life
should be evaluated in the light of this eternal life: life on earth is not definitive,
but transitory and relative; it is a means to be used to achieve definitive life in
heaven: “All that, which worries you for the moment, is of relative importance.
What is of absolute importance is that you be happy, that you be saved” (St.
J. Escriva, The Way, 297).

“There is a kind of fear around, a fear of the Cross, of our Lord’s Cross. What
has happened is that people have begun to regard as crosses all the unpleasant
things that crop up in life, and they do not know how to take them as God’s chil-
dren should, with supernatural outlook. So much so, that they are even removing
the roadside crosses set up by our forefathers. . . ! “In the Passion, the Cross
ceased to be a symbol of punishment and became instead a sign of victory. The
Cross is the emblem of the Redeemer: in quo est salus,vita et resurrectio nostra:
there lies our salvation, our life and our resurrection” (St. J. Escriva, The Way of
the Cross, II, 5).

35. “Life”: in the original text and the New Vulgate the word literally means “soul.”
But here, as in many other cases, “soul” and “life” are equivalent. The word “life”
is used, clearly, in a double sense: earthly life and eternal life, the life of man
here on earth and man’s eternal happiness in heaven. Death can put an end to
earthly life, but it cannot destroy eternal life (cf. Mt 10:28), the life which can
only be given by Him who brings the dead back to life.

Understood in this way, we can grasp the paradoxical meaning of our Lord’s
phrase: whoever wishes to save his (earthly) life will lose his (eternal) life. But
whoever loses his (earthly) life for me and the Gospel, will save his (eternal) life.
What, then, does saving one’s (earthly) life mean? It means living this life as if
here were none other — letting oneself be controlled by the lust of the flesh and
the lust of the eyes and the pride of life (cf. 1 Jn 2: 16). And losing one’s (earthly)
life means mortifying, by continuous ascetical effort, this triple concupiscence —
that is, taking up one’s cross (v. 34} — and consequently seek ing and savouring
the things that are God’s and not the things of the earth (cf. Col 3:1-2).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 09/15/2012 9:22:05 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Isaiah 50:5-9 ©
The Lord has opened my ear.
For my part, I made no resistance,
neither did I turn away.
I offered my back to those who struck me,
my cheeks to those who tore at my beard;
I did not cover my face
against insult and spittle.
The Lord comes to my help,
so that I am untouched by the insults.
So, too, I set my face like flint;
I know I shall not be shamed.
My vindicator is here at hand. Does anyone start proceedings against me?
Then let us go to court together.
Who thinks he has a case against me?
Let him approach me.
The Lord is coming to my help,
who will dare to condemn me?

Psalm Psalm 114:1-6,8-9 ©
I will walk in the presence of the Lord in the land of the living.
I love the Lord for he has heard
  the cry of my appeal;
for he turned his ear to me
  in the day when I called him.
I will walk in the presence of the Lord in the land of the living.
They surrounded me, the snares of death,
  with the anguish of the tomb;
they caught me, sorrow and distress.
  I called on the Lord’s name.
O Lord, my God, deliver me!
I will walk in the presence of the Lord in the land of the living.
How gracious is the Lord, and just;
  our God has compassion.
The Lord protects the simple hearts;
  I was helpless so he saved me.
I will walk in the presence of the Lord in the land of the living.
He has kept my soul from death,
  my eyes from tears
  and my feet from stumbling.
I will walk in the presence of the Lord
  in the land of the living.
I will walk in the presence of the Lord in the land of the living.

Second reading James 2:14-18 ©
Take the case, my brothers, of someone who has never done a single good act but claims that he has faith. Will that faith save him? If one of the brothers or one of the sisters is in need of clothes and has not enough food to live on, and one of you says to them, ‘I wish you well; keep yourself warm and eat plenty’, without giving them these bare necessities of life, then what good is that? Faith is like that: if good works do not go with it, it is quite dead.
  This is the way to talk to people of that kind: ‘You say you have faith and I have good deeds; I will prove to you that I have faith by showing you my good deeds – now you prove to me that you have faith without any good deeds to show.’

Gospel Acclamation Jn14:6
Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, says the Lord;
No one can come to the Father except through me.
Alleluia!
Or Ga6:14
Alleluia, alleluia!
The only thing I can boast about is the cross of our Lord,
through whom the world is crucified to me, and I to the world.
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 8:27-35 ©
Jesus and his disciples left for the villages round Caesarea Philippi. On the way he put this question to his disciples, ‘Who do people say I am?’ And they told him. ‘John the Baptist,’ they said ‘others Elijah; others again, one of the prophets.’ ‘But you,’ he asked ‘who do you say I am?’ Peter spoke up and said to him, ‘You are the Christ.’ And he gave them strict orders not to tell anyone about him.
  And he began to teach them that the Son of Man was destined to suffer grievously, to be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and to be put to death, and after three days to rise again; and he said all this quite openly. Then, taking him aside, Peter started to remonstrate with him. But, turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said to him, ‘Get behind me, Satan! Because the way you think is not God’s way but man’s.’
  He called the people and his disciples to him and said, ‘If anyone wants to be a follower of mine, let him renounce himself and take up his cross and follow me. For anyone who wants to save his life will lose it; but anyone who loses his life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it.’

6 posted on 09/15/2012 9:25:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


 

PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION



Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. These prayers were in effect until after Vatican II. A decade later Paul VI said, "satan has entered the sanctuary." Could the elimination of these powerful prayers with a ten year indulgence have played a huge part in allowing the devil such easy access? The answer is obvious. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. After Vatican II, in legion with the devil Giovanni Montini outlawed this necessary prayer and then one wonders how "the smoke of satan" got into the sanctuary? The conciliarists wanted to make sure the words in bold below would never see the light of day again for in it Leo foretold what would happen: The shepherd would be struck, the sheep scattered. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen.


7 posted on 09/15/2012 9:26:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
8 posted on 09/15/2012 9:36:30 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 09/15/2012 9:38:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
10 posted on 09/15/2012 9:39:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


11 posted on 09/15/2012 9:40:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


12 posted on 09/15/2012 9:41:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

13 posted on 09/15/2012 9:42:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


14 posted on 09/15/2012 9:43:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Our Blessed Lady's Sorrows

Sea of Sorrow

Oh! on what a sea of sorrow
Was the Virgin-Mother cast,
When her eyes with tears o'erflowing
Gazed upon her Son aghast,
From the bloodstained gibbet taken,
Dying in her arms at last.

In her bitter desolation,
His sweet mouth, His bosom too,
Then His riven side beloved,
Then each hand, both wounded through,
Then His feet, with blood encrimsoned,
Her maternal tears bedew.

She, a hundred times and over,
Strains Him closely to her breast
Heart to Heart, arms arms enfolding,
Are His wounds on her impressed:
Thus, in sorrow's very kisses,
Melts her anguished soul to rest.

Oh, dear Mother! we beseech thee,
By the tears thine eyes have shed,
By the cruel death of Jesus
And His wounds' right royal red,
Make our hearts o'erflow with sorrow
From thy heart's deep fountainhead.

To the Father, Son, and Spirit,
Now we bend on equal knee:
Glory, sempiternal glory,
To the Most High Trinity;
Yea! perpetual praise and honor
Now and through all ages be.

Novena Prayer To Our Sorrowful Mother

Most Blessed and afflicted Virgin, Queen of Martyrs, who didst stand generously beneath the cross, beholding the agony of thy dying Son; by the sword of sorrow which then pierced thy soul, by the sufferings of thy sorrowful life, by the unutterable joy which now more than repays thee for them; look down with a mother's pity and tenderness, as I kneel before thee to compassionate thy sorrows, and to lay my petition with childlike confidence in thy wounded heart. I beg of thee, O my Mother, to plead continually for me with thy Son, since He can refuse thee nothing, and through the merits of His most sacred Passion and Death, together with thy own sufferings at the foot of the cross, so to touch His Sacred Heart, that I may obtain my request,
For to whom shall I fly in my wants and miseries, if not to thee, O Mother of mercy, who, having so deeply drunk the chalice of thy Son, canst most pity us poor exiles, still doomed to sigh in this vale of tears? Offer to Jesus but one drop of His Precious Blood, but one pang of His adorable Heart; remind Him that thou art our life, our sweetness, and our hope, and thou wilt obtain what I ask, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Hail Mary
Virgin Most Sorrowful, pray for us
(Seven times each)

Mary, most holy Virgin and Queen of Martyrs, accept the sincere homage of my filial affection. Into thy Heart, pierced by so many swords, do thou welcome my poor soul. Receive it as the companion of thy sorrows at the foot of the Cross, on which Jesus died for the redemption of the world. With thee, O sorrowful Virgin, I will gladly suffer all the trials, contradictions, and infirmities which it shall please Our Lord to send me. I offer them all to thee in memory of thy sorrows, so that: every thought of my mind and every beat of my heart may be an act of compassion and of love for thee. And do thou, sweet Mother, have pity on me, reconcile me to thy Divine Son, Jesus; keep me in His grace and assist me in my last agony, so that I may be able to meet thee in Heaven and sing thy glories.

Most holy Virgin and Mother, whose soul was pierced by a sword of sorrow in the Passion of thy Divine Son, and who in His glorious Resurrection wast filled with never ending joy at His triumph, obtain for us who call upon thee, so to be partakers in the adversities of Holy Church and the Sorrows of the Sovereign Pontiff, as to be found worthy to rejoice with them in the consolations for which we pray, in the charity and peace of the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Litany of the Seven Sorrows

For private use only.

Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.

God the Father of Heaven,
Have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
Have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God,
Have mercy on us.

Holy Mary,
Pray for us.
Holy Mother of God,
Pray for us.
Holy Virgin of virgins, etc.
Mother crucified,
Mother sorrowful,
Mother tearful,
Mother afflicted,
Mother forsaken,
Mother desolate,
Mother bereft of thy Child,
Mother transfixed with the sword,
Mother consumed with grief,
Mother filled with anguish,
Mother crucified in heart,
Mother most sad,
Fountain of tears,
Abyss of suffering,
Mirror of patience,
Rock of constancy,
Anchor of confidence,
Refuge of the forsaken,
Shield of the oppressed,
Subduer of the unbelieving,
Comfort of the afflicted,
Medicine of the sick,
Strength of the weak,
Harbor of the wrecked,
Allayer of tempests,
Resource of mourners,
Terror of the treacherous,
Treasure of the faithful,
Eye of the Prophets,
Staff of the Apostles,
Crown of Martyrs,
Light of confessors,
Pearl of virgins,
Consolation of widows,
Joy of all Saints,

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.

Look down upon us, deliver us, and save us from all trouble,
in the power of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Let Us Pray.
Imprint, O Lady, thy wounds upon my heart, that I may read therein sorrow and love
--- sorrow to endure every sorrow for thee, love to despise every love for thee. Amen.

Conclude with the Apostles Creed, Hail Holy Queen, and three Hail Marys,
in honor of the Most Holy Heart of Mary.

Stabat Mater Dolorosa

Stabat mater dolorosa
iuxta Crucem lacrimosa,
dum pendebat Filius.

Cuius animam gementem,
contristatam et dolentem
pertransivit gladius.

O quam tristis et afflicta
fuit illa benedicta,
mater Unigeniti!

Quae maerebat et dolebat,
pia Mater, dum videbat
nati poenas inclyti.

Quis est homo qui non fleret,
matrem Christi si videret
in tanto supplicio?

Quis non posset contristari
Christi Matrem contemplari
dolentem cum Filio?

Pro peccatis suae gentis
vidit Iesum in tormentis,
et flagellis subditum.

Vidit suum dulcem Natum
moriendo desolatum,
dum emisit spiritum.

Eia, Mater, fons amoris
me sentire vim doloris
fac, ut tecum lugeam.

Fac, ut ardeat cor meum
in amando Christum Deum
ut sibi complaceam.

Sancta Mater, istud agas,
crucifixi fige plagas
cordi meo valide.

Tui Nati vulnerati,
tam dignati pro me pati,
poenas mecum divide.

Fac me tecum pie flere,
crucifixo condolere,
donec ego vixero.

Iuxta Crucem tecum stare,
et me tibi sociare
in planctu desidero.

Virgo virginum praeclara,
mihi iam non sis amara,
fac me tecum plangere.

Fac, ut portem Christi mortem,
passionis fac consortem,
et plagas recolere.

Fac me plagis vulnerari,
fac me Cruce inebriari,
et cruore Filii.

Flammis ne urar succensus,
per te, Virgo, sim defensus
in die iudicii.

Christe, cum sit hinc exire,
da per Matrem me venire
ad palmam victoriae.

Quando corpus morietur,
fac, ut animae donetur
paradisi gloria. Amen.

Prayer To Our Lady of Sorrows, by St. Bridget

O Blessed Virgin Mary, Immaculate Mother of God, who didst endure a martyrdom of love and grief beholding the sufferings and sorrows of Jesus! Thou didst cooperate in the benefit of my redemption by thine innumerable afflictions and by offering to the Eternal Father His only begotten Son as a holocaust and victim of propitiation for my sins. I thank thee for the unspeakable love which led thee to deprive thyself of the Fruit of thy womb, Jesus, true God and true Man, to save me, a sinner. Oh, make use of the unfailing intercession of thy sorrows with the Father and the Son, that I may steadfastly amend my life and never again crucify my loving Redeemer by new sins, and that, persevering till death in His grace. I may obtain eternal life through the merits of His Cross and Passion. Amen.

Mother of love, of sorrow and of mercy, pray for us.

Saint Alphonsus Liguori's Prayer To The Mother Of Sorrows

O, my Blessed Mother, it is not one sword only with which I have pierced thy heart, but I have done so with as many as are the sins which I have committed. O, Lady, it is not to thee, who art innocent, that sufferings are due, but to me, who am guilty of so many crimes. But since thou hast been pleased to suffer so much for me, by thy merits, obtain me great sorrow for my sins, and patience under the trials of this life, which will always be light in comparison with my demerits; for I have often deserved Hell.
Amen.


 

Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: The 7 Sorrows (Dolours) and 7 Joys of Our Lady
The Seven Dolors (Sorrows) of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Devotional]
Apparition in Africa: Our Lady of Sorrows [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Feast of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary [Catholic Caucus Devotional]
Feast of Our Lady/Mother of Sorrows
Homilies on Our Lady of Sorrows
Starkenburg:Pilgrimage to Our Lady of Sorrows Shrine
Our Mother of Sorrows
ST. ALPHONSUS LIGUORI, OF THE DOLOURS OF MARY, The Glories [Sorrows] of Mary
Our Lady of Sorrows - Sep 15



15 posted on 09/15/2012 9:44:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

September 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: That politicians may always act with honesty, integrity, and love for the truth.

Missionary Intention: Help for the Poorest Churches. That Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people, along with concrete resources, to the poorest Churches.


16 posted on 09/15/2012 9:44:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY MK 8:27-35
Ponder the depths of God’s love
Fr. Jack Peterson, YA

As I get older, I appreciate more and more the countless sacrifices my parents made for me and my three sisters. There were monetary sacrifices required to put a roof over our heads and food on the table, send us to Catholic schools and to college, and pay for sports fees and broken windows. There were sacrifices of time spent doing laundry, carting us to sporting events, assisting with school projects and accomplishing home-improvement projects. There were unspoken sacrifices like not graduating from college, not taking up hobbies and putting off travel plans in order to provide for the four of us. I get a little overwhelmed sometimes as I think of all that they lovingly surrendered for the sake of our family. Words can’t properly express how much they loved us and sacrificed for us.

As we journey through life as Christians, a similar sentiment should well up in our hearts of deep gratitude and unworthiness as we ponder the sacrificial love and marvelous deeds of Jesus Christ. Jesus was present to the Father when the world in all its beauty was fashioned from absolutely nothing except His power, wisdom and love. Jesus was at the Father’s side when each of us was formed in His mind and created in His image and likeness in our mother’s womb. Jesus leapt down from heaven to dwell among us because we were lost and had gone astray. Jesus patiently put up with His disciples and Twelve Apostles, even when they remained lost, confused and selfish.

However, the great challenge for each Christian is to find a way to ponder in prayer and appreciate in faith what Christ did for us at the end of His earthly journey. On the one hand, we can’t fully grasp everything that Jesus sacrificed for us because His wisdom and love are infinite. On the other hand, we owe it to Him, as recipients of so much love, to give it the old college try. As human beings we have the capacity to see great goodness, to know gratitude and to express that gratitude in some appropriate fashion to the One who has been immeasurably good to us.

As always, the Scriptures are a great help in this project. So many events in the Old Testament herald and foreshadow what Christ did for us. So many prophets spoke in surprisingly clear terms about the events that would define Jesus’ saving mission.

Today, we have a terrific example of the latter when we hear the prophet Isaiah speak in an eerily direct way about Jesus’ passion: “I gave my back to those who beat me, my cheeks to those who plucked my beard; my face I did not shield from buffets and spitting.” God Himself, in the flesh, in the person of Jesus Christ, was scourged, buffeted, spat upon and mocked for us and for our salvation. Again, words seem inadequate to the task of expressing the depth of love and sacrifice present in those actions.

Peter demonstrates the fact that it is not easy to believe in these saving mysteries. Jesus takes the time to explain to the disciples during His public ministry that He will be handed over, suffer profoundly, be put to death and rise on the third day. Peter can’t see the wisdom of this plan at first and rebukes Jesus for such ideas. Jesus, in turn, uses some harsh language (“Get behind me, Satan”) to chastise Peter for failing to be open to God’s plan, to what must happen for our salvation, to the depths of Jesus’ love. Jesus says to Peter, “You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do.”

I am sure that Peter loves Jesus and does not want to hear that the Lord will have to suffer such an agony. I imagine that Peter also was thinking that if Jesus must undergo such trials, so must His disciples. There were plenty of human reasons at the moment to object to Jesus’ revelation.

In the end, Jesus was abandoned by His disciples, put through a false trial, scourged at the pillar, mocked and spat upon, and nailed to a tree. He also rose from the dead on the third day in fulfillment of the Scriptures. Soon thereafter, He would send the Holy Spirit upon the earth. These acts make up the greatest act of love the world has ever known.

How do we respond? First, with gratitude … profound gratitude. While we have a sense that we can’t possibly thank Him enough for what He has done, we find refuge in knowing that if we truly ponder the meaning of these events and groan inwardly with grateful love, it will be pleasing to Him. Then we strive, with His grace, to live our lives in a similar way to His. This is the great project of being a Christian.

Fr. Peterson is assistant chaplain at Marymount University in Arlington and director of the Youth Apostles Institute in McLean.


17 posted on 09/15/2012 9:56:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Isaiah 50:4-9 II: James 2:14-18
Gospel
Mark 8:27-35

27 And Jesus went on with his disciples, to the villages of Caesare'a Philip'pi; and on the way he asked his disciples, "Who do men say that I am?"
28 And they told him, "John the Baptist; and others say, Eli'jah; and others one of the prophets."
29 And he asked them, "But who do you say that I am?" Peter answered him, "You are the Christ."
30 And he charged them to tell no one about him.
31 And he began to teach them that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.
32 And he said this plainly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. 33 But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter, and said, "Get behind me, Satan! For you are not on the side of God, but of men."
34 And he called to him the multitude with his disciples, and said to them, "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.
35 For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel's will save it.


Interesting Details
  • (v.28) In the popular mind, the Messiah was a nationalistic, political leader that would restore the glory days of Israel. Jewish people of Jesus' day (and still now) believed that Elijah had to re-appear before the Messiah would come. John the Baptist was considered by many to be Elijah. Jesus was also considered by the public in a similar fashion.
  • (v.30) Because of the political implication of Messiahship in the popular understanding, Jesus did not want his disciples to publicize him being the Messiah lest it precipitates a revolution against Rome.
  • (v.31) "Son of Man" (ben adam) appears 81 times in the Gospels and never used by anyone but Jesus to call himself. It has two meanings. One is simply mean "I." The other, taken from Dan 7:13-14, is a heavenly figure entrusted by God with authority, glory and sovereign power.
  • (vv.32-33) Suffering and rejection had no place in the popular concept of Messiah, thus it was normal for Peter to get upset with Jesus' prediction. Yet, by calling Peter "Satan" (meaning the "adversary") Jesus did not mean that Peter was the devil. He only pointed out that Peter's attempt to dissuade Jesus from going to the cross was like that of the devil, which is adversarial to God's plan.
  • (vv.34-35) Discipleship may result in the lost of physical life but that loss is insignificant when compare with gaining eternal life.

One Main Point

Following Jesus is no rose garden. It will cost you everything.


Reflections
  1. If you meet Jesus today, how do you answer his question: "Who do you say I am?"
  2. In what areas of your life (relationships, priorities, family, career...) does "your way" still conflict with "Jesus' way"?
  3. What does the call to "deny yourself and carry the cross" mean to you personally? How do you apply that in your life?

19 posted on 09/15/2012 10:16:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, September 16, 2012
Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Isaiah 50:5-9
Psalm 116:1-6, 8-9
James 2:14-18
Mark 8:27-35

The rosary is said not with the lips alone, muttering Hail Marys one after the other. … For a Christian vocal prayer must spring from the heart, so that while the rosary is said, the mind can enter into contemplation of each one of the mysteries.

-- St. Josemaria Escriva


20 posted on 09/15/2012 10:19:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


21 posted on 09/15/2012 10:20:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sep 16, Invitatory for Twenty-Fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah
they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

22 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:18 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 16, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper of Seasons: 252
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1087

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
Early in the morning our song shall rise to thee:
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore thee,
Casting down their golden crown around the glassy sea.
Cherubim and seraphim bowing down before thee.
Which were and are and evermore shall be.

Holy, holy, holy! Though the darkness hide thee,
Though the eye of sinful man thy glory may not see,
Only Thou art holy. There is none beside thee.
Perfect in power in love and purity.

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth and sky, and sea;
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Melody: Nicaea 11.12.12.10; Music: John B. Dykes, 1823-1876; Text: Reginald Heber, 1783-1826
“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty ” performed by Norwich Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Psalm 24
The Lord’s entry into his temple

Christ opened heaven for us in the manhood he assumed (St. Irenaeus).

The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness,
the world and all its peoples.
It is he who set it on the seas;
on the waters he made it firm.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who shall climb the mountain of the Lord?
Who shall stand in his holy place?
The man with clean hands and pure heart,
who desires not worthless things,
who has not sworn so as to deceive his neighbor.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

He shall receive blessings from the Lord
and reward from the God who saves him.
Such are the men who seek him,
seek the face of the God of Jacob.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who is the king of glory?
The Lord, the mighty, the valiant,
the Lord, the valiant in war.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Who is he, the king of glory?
He, the Lord of armies,
he is the king of glory.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

When your Son was unjustly condemned, Lord God, and surrounded by the impious, he cried to you, and you set him free. Watch over your people as the treasure of your heart and guide their steps along safe paths that they may see your face.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Ant. 2 Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Psalm 66
Eucharistic hymn

The Lord is risen and all people have been brought by him to the Father (Hesychius).

I

Cry out with joy to God, all the earth,
O sing to the glory of his name.
O render him glorious praise.
Say to God: “How tremendous your deeds!

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Because of the greatness of your strength
your enemies cringe before you.
Before you all the earth shall bow;
shall sing to you, sing to your name!”

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Come and see the works of God,
tremendous his deeds among men.
He turned the sea into dry land,
they passed through the river dry-shod.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Let our joy then be in him;
he rules for ever by his might.
His eyes keep watch over the nations;
let rebels not rise against him.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

O peoples, bless our God,
let the voice of his praise resound,
of the God who gave life to our souls
and kept our feet from stumbling.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

For you, O God, have tested us,
you have tried us as silver is tried:
you led us, God, into the snare;
you laid a heavy burden on our backs.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

You let men ride over our heads;
we went through fire and through water
but then you brought us relief.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

II

Burnt offering I bring to your house;
to you I will pay my vows,
the vows which my lips have uttered,
which my mouth spoke in my distress.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

I will offer burnt offerings of fatlings
with the smoke of burning rams.
I will offer bullocks and goats.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Come and hear, all who fear God.
I will tell what he did for my soul:
to him I cried aloud,
with high praise ready on my tongue.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

If there had been evil in my heart,
the Lord would not have listened.
But truly God has listened;
he has heeded the voice of my prayer.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Blessed be God who did not reject my prayer
nor withhold his love from me.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty Father, in the death and resurrection of your own Son you brought us through the waters of baptism to the shores of new life. By those waters and the fire of the Holy Spirit you have given each of us consolation. Accept our sacrifice of praise; may our lives be a total offering to you, and may we deserve to enter your house and there with Christ praise your unfailing power.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

God’s word is alive; it strikes to the heart.
It pierces more surely than a two-edged sword.

READINGS

First reading
From the beginning of the book of the prophet Ezekiel
1:3-13, 22-28
The vision of God’s glory in the land of exile

The word of the Lord came to the priest Ezekiel, the son of Buzi, in the land of the Chaldeans by the river Chebar.—There the hand of the Lord came upon me.

As I looked, a stormwind came from the North, a huge cloud with flashing fire [enveloped in brightness], from the midst of which [the midst of the fire] something gleamed like electrum. Within it were figures resembling four living creatures that looked like this: their form was human, but each had four faces and four wings, and their legs went straight down; the soles of their feet were round. They sparkled with a gleam like burnished bronze.

Their faces were like this: each of the four had the face of a man, but on the right side was the face of a lion, and on the left side the face of an ox, and finally each had the face of an eagle. Their faces [and their wings] looked out on all their four sides; they did not turn when they moved, but each went straight forward. [Each went straight forward; wherever the spirit wished to go, there they went; they did not turn when they moved.]

Human hands were under their wings, and the wings of one touched those of another. Each had two wings spread out above so that they touched one another’s, while the other two wings of each covered his body. In among the living creatures something like burning coals of fire could be seen; they seemed like torches, moving to and fro among the living creatures. The fire gleamed, and from it came forth flashes of lightning. Over the heads of the living creatures, something like a firmament could be seen, seeming like glittering crystal, stretched straight out above their heads. Beneath the firmament their wings were stretched out, one toward the other. [Each of them had two covering his body.] Then I heard the sound of their wings, like the roaring of mighty waters, like the voice of the Almighty. When they moved, the sound of the tumult was like the din of an army. [And when they stood still, they lowered their wings.]

Above the firmament over their heads something like a throne could be seen, looking like sapphire. Upon it was seated, up above, one who had the appearance of a man. Upward from what resembled his waist I saw what gleamed like electrum; downward from what resembled his waist I saw what looked like fire; he was surrounded with splendor. Like the bow which appears in the clouds on a rainy day was the splendor that surrounded him. Such was the vision of the likeness of the glory of the Lord.

RESPONSORY See Ezekiel 1:26; 2:12; Revelation 5:13

I saw what looked like a throne
and high upon it was seated
one who had the appearance of a man;
and I heard a loud rumbling cry:
Praise to the glory of the Lord in his dwelling place.

Praise and honor, glory and power to him who sits on the throne,
and to the Lamb for ever and ever.
Praise to the glory of the Lord in his dwelling place.

Second reading
From the beginning of a sermon On Pastors by Saint Augustine, bishop
I am a Christian as well as a leader

You have often learned that all our hope is in Christ and that he is our true glory and our salvation. You are members of the flock of the Good Shepherd, who watches over Israel and nourishes his people. Yet there are shepherds who want to have the title of shepherd without wanting to fulfill a pastor’s duties; let us then recall what God says to his shepherds through the prophet. You must listen attentively; I must listen with fear and trembling.

The word of the Lord came to me and said: Son of man, prophesy against the shepherds of Israel and speak to the shepherds of Israel. We just heard this reading a moment ago, my brothers, and I have decided to speak to you on this passage. The Lord will help me to speak the truth if I do not speak on my own authority. For if I speak on my own authority, I will be a shepherd nourishing myself and not the sheep. However, if my words are the Lord’s, then he is nourishing you no matter who speaks. Thus says the Lord God: Shepherds of Israel, who have been nourishing only themselves! Should not the shepherds nourish the sheep? In other words, true shepherds take care of their sheep, not themselves. This is the principal reason why God condemns those shepherds: they took care of themselves rather than their sheep. Who are they who nourish themselves? They are the shepherds the Apostle described when he said: They all seek what is theirs and not what is Christ’s.

I must distinguish carefully between two aspects of the role the lord has given me, a role that demands a rigorous accountability, a role based on the Lord’s greatness rather than on my own merit. The first aspect is that I am a Christian; the second, that I am a leader. I am a Christian for my own sake, whereas I am a leader for your sake; the fact that I am a Christian is to my own advantage, but I am a leader for your advantage.

Many persons come to God as Christians but not as leaders. Perhaps they travel by an easier road and are less hindered since they bear a lighter burden. In addition to the fact that I am a Christian and must give God an account of my life, I as a leader must give him an account of my stewardship as well.

RESPONSORY Psalm 23:1-2, 3

The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.
In green pastures he gives me rest.

He guides me in the right path for his name’s sake.
In green pastures he gives me rest.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Look upon us,
O God, Creator and ruler of all things,
and, that we may feel the working of your mercy,
grant that we may serve you with all our heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

23 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:27 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 16, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Seasons: 256
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1091

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of the Season: 629
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 925

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

From all that dwell below the skies,
Let the Creator’s Name arise;
Alleluia, alleluia.
Let the Redeemer’s Name be sung,
Through every land, by every tongue.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Eternal are Thy mercies, Lord;
Eternal truth attends Thy Word.
Alleluia, alleluia.
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore,
Till sunshine rise and set no more.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

Your lofty themes, ye mortals, bring,
In songs of praise divinely sing;
Alleluia, alleluia.
The great salvation loud proclaim,
And shout for joy the Savior’s Name.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

In every land begin the song;
To every land the strains belong;
Alleluia, alleluia.
In cheerful sounds all voices raise,
And fill the world with loudest praise.
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

From All That Dwell Below the Skies by St. Michael’s Singers; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: John Hatton, 1793.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation

The Lord our mighty God now reigns supreme; let us rejoice and be glad and give him praise (Revelation 19:6-7).

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents, to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Ant.2 Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Canticle – Daniel 3:52-57
Let all creatures praise the Lord

The Creator… is blessed for ever (Romans 1:25).

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

And blessed is your holy and glorious name,
praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,
praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you who look into the depths
from your throne upon the cherubim,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Blessed are you in the firmament of heaven,
praiseworthy and glorious forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord,
praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Ant. 3 Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 150
Praise the Lord

Let mind and heart be in your song: this is to glorify God with your whole self (Hesychius).

Praise God in his holy place,
praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his powerful deeds,
praise his surpassing greatness.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

O praise him with sound of trumpet,
praise him with lute and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance,
praise him with strings and pipes.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

O praise him with resounding cymbals,
praise him with clashing of cymbals.
Let everything that lives and that breathes
give praise to the Lord.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, maker of heaven and earth and of all created things, you make your just ones holy and you justify sinners who confess your name. Hear us as we humbly pray to you: give us eternal joy with your saints.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

READING 2 Timothy 2:8, 11-13

Remember that Jesus Christ, a descendant of David,
was raised from the dead. You can depend on this:
If we have died with him
we shall also live with him;
If we hold out to the end
we shall also reign with him.
But if we deny him he will deny us. If we are unfaithful
he will still remain faithful, for he cannot deny himself.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

We cry aloud how marvelous you are,
as we call upon your name.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. He who loses his life because of me and for the sake of the Gospel shall save it, says the Lord.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. He who loses his life because of me and for the sake of the Gospel shall save it, says the Lord.

INTERCESSIONS

Open your hearts to praise the God of power and goodness, for he loves us and knows our needs:
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

We bless you, almighty God, King of the universe, because you called us while we were yet sinners,
to acknowledge your truth and to serve your majesty.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

O God, you opened the gates of mercy for us,
let us never turn aside from the path of life.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

As we celebrate the resurrection of your beloved Son,
help us to spend this day in the spirit of joy.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

Give to your faithful, O Lord, a prayerful spirit of gratitude,
that we may thank you for all your gifts.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Look upon us,
O God, Creator and ruler of all things,
and, that we may feel the working of your mercy,
grant that we may serve you With all our heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

24 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:32 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 16, Midday Prayer for Sunday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
Proper of Seasons: 256 (concluding prayer)
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1097 (Midday)

Midday Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time, using Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made,
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder,
Thy power throughout the universe displayed:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

When through the woods and forest glades I wander
And hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;
When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur
And hear the brook and feel the gentle breeze:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss; Originally this was a Swedish folk melody, “O Store Gud” by Carl Boberg (1859-1940) and was translated by Stuart K. Hine in 1899.
”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Psalm 23
The Good Shepherd
The Lamb himself will be their shepherd and will lead them to the springs of living waters (Revelation 7:17).

The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.
Fresh and green are the pastures
where he gives me repose.
Near restful waters he leads me,
to revive my drooping spirit.

He guides me along the right path;
he is true to his name.
If I should walk in the valley of darkness
no evil would I fear.
You are there with your crook and your staff;
with these you give me comfort.

You have prepared a banquet for me
in the sight of my foes.
My head you have anointed with oil;
my cup is overflowing.

Surely goodness and kindness shall follow me
all the days of my life.
In the Lord’s own house shall I dwell
for ever and ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord Jesus Christ, Shepherd of your Church, you give us new birth in the waters of baptism, anoint us with saving oil, and call us to salvation at your table. Dispel the terrors of death and the darkness of error. Lead your people along safe paths that they may rest securely in you and live for ever in your Father’s house.

Ant. He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Psalm 76
Thanksgiving for victory
They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven (Matthew 24:30).

I

God is made known in Judah;
in Israel his name is great.
He set up his tent in Jerusalem
and his dwelling place in Zion.
It was there he broke the flashing arrows,
the shield, the sword, the armor.

You, O Lord, are resplendent,
more majestic than the everlasting mountains.
The warriors, despoiled, slept in death;
the hands of the soldiers were powerless.
At your threat, O God of Jacob,
horse and rider lay stunned.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

II

You, you alone, strike terror.
Who shall stand when your anger is roused?
You uttered your sentence from the heavens;
the earth in terror was still
when God arose to judge,
to save the humble of the earth.

Men’s anger will serve to praise you;
its survivors surround you in joy.
Make vows to your God and fulfill them.
Let all pay tribute to him who strikes terror,
who cuts short the life of princes,
who strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Your power is awesome, Father, and wonderful is your holiness. In your presence the earth both trembles and stands still, for you shattered death’s power by the cross. Rise to help your people: give your light, and grant salvation to the meek of the earth, that they may praise your name in heaven.

Ant. Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

READING Deuteronomy 10:12

What does the Lord, your God, ask of you but to fear the Lord, your God, and follow his ways exactly, to love and serve the Lord, your God, with all your heart and all your soul?

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Lord, who can dwell in your sanctuary?
One whose life is blameless, and whose heart is true.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Look upon us,
O God, Creator and ruler of all things,
and, that we may feel the working of your mercy,
grant that we may serve you with all our heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

25 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:38 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 16, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 668
Proper of Seasons: 256
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1101

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
Proper of Seasons: 630
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 931

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Love divine, all loves excelling,
joy of heaven, to earth come down;
fix in us thy humble dwelling;
all thy faithful mercies crown!
Jesus thou art all compassion,
pure, unbounded love thou art;
visit us with thy salvation;
enter every trembling heart.

Come, Almighty to deliver,
let us all thy life receive;
suddenly return and never,
nevermore thy temples leave.
Thee we would be always blessing,
serve thee as thy hosts above,
pray and praise thee without ceasing,
glory in thy perfect love.

Finish, then, thy new creation;
pure and spotless let us be.
Let us see thy great salvation
perfectly restored in thee;
changed from glory into glory,
till in heaven we take our place,
till we cast our crowns before thee,
lost in wonder, love, and praise.

“Love divine all loves excelling”; Words: Charles Wesley, 1747. Music: John Zundel, 1870
“Love divine all loves excelling” by Gloucester Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Psalm 110
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. In eternal splendor, before the dawn of light on earth, I have begotten you, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Psalm 112
The happiness of the just man

Live as children born of the light. Light produces every kind of goodness and justice and truth (Ephesians 5:8-9).

Happy the man who fears the Lord,
who takes delight in his commands.
His sons will be powerful on earth;
the children of the upright are blessed.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Riches and wealth are in his house;
his justice stands firm for ever
He is a light in the darkness for the upright:
he is generous, merciful and just.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

The good man takes pity and lends,
he conducts his affairs with honor.
The just man will never waver:
he will be remembered for ever.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

He has no fear of evil news;
with a firm heart he trusts in the Lord.
With a steadfast heart he will not fear;
he will see the downfall of his foes.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Open-handed, he gives to the poor;
his justice stands firm for ever.
His head will be raised in glory.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

The wicked man sees and is angry,
grinds his teeth and fades away;
the desire of the wicked leads to doom.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you are the eternal light which illumines the hearts of good people. Help us to love you, to rejoice in your glory, and so to live in this world as to avoid harsh judgment in the next. May we come to see the light of your countenance.

Ant. Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for holiness; they will be satisfied.

Ant. 3 Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the Lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King;
Alleluia.
Let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Praise God, all you who serve him, both great and small, alleluia.

READING Hebrews 12:22-24

You have drawn near to Mount Zion and the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, to myriads of angels in festal gathering, to the assembly of the first-born enrolled in heaven, to God the judge of all, to the spirits of just men made perfect, to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant, and to the sprinkled blood which speaks more eloquently than that of Abel.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

His wisdom is beyond compare,
mighty is his power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Our Lord is great, mighty is his power.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. I say to you: there is great rejoicing among the angels of God over one repentant sinner.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. I say to you: there is great rejoicing among the angels of God over one repentant sinner.

INTERCESSIONS

Rejoicing in the Lord, from whom all good things come, let us pray:
Lord, hear our prayer.

Father and Lord of all, you sent your Son into the world, that your name might be glorified in every place,
strengthen the witness of your Church among the nations.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Make us obedient to the teachings of your apostles,
and bound to the truth of our faith.
Lord, hear our prayer.

As you love the innocent,
render justice to those who are wronged.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Free those in bondage and give sight to the blind,
raise up the fallen and protect the stranger.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Fulfill your promise to those who already sleep in your peace,
through your Son grant them a blessed resurrection.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Look upon us,
O God, Creator and ruler of all things,
and, that we may feel the working of your mercy,
grant that we may serve you with all our heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

26 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:46 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 16, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, Page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

27 posted on 09/16/2012 2:02:55 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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WDTPRS: 24th Ordinary Sunday – Does it make any difference pray?

The Collect for the 24th Ordinary Sunday was not in pre-Conciliar editions of the Roman Missal but it has an antecedent in the ancient Veronese Sacramentary amongst the prayers used during September.

Respice nos, rerum omnium Deus creator et rector, et, ut tuae propitiationis sentiamus effectum, toto nos tribue tibi corde servire.

Propitiatio means “an appeasing; atonement”.  It can also mean the propitiatory sacrifice itself.

LITERAL RENDERING:

Be mindful of us, O God, creator and ruler of all things, and, in order that we may sense the effect of Your act of atonement, allow us to serve You with our whole heart.

CURRENT ICEL (2011):

Look upon us, O God, Creator and ruler of all things, and, that we may feel the working of your mercy, grant that we may serve you with all our heart.

St. Augustine (+430), in his autobiographical prayer the Confessions (3, 7), uses the phrase “unus et verus creator et rector universitatis”, very like the first line.  Augustine certainly knew the hymns of Milan’s bishop St. Ambrose (+397), which he heard sung in cathedral.  To my ear, this first line rings like Ambrose’s hymn Deus Creator Omnium, which is, in part, included in the Liturgy of Hours for 1st Vespers of Sundays during Ordinary Time.

Propitiation is a prayerful act of appeasement begging for God’s mercy. Because we are sinners, we seek mitigation of the punishments we justly deserve for our sins both in this world and temporal punishment in the next.  Propitiation is distinguished from impetration (from Latin impetro, “to obtain, by exertion, entreaty”).  Impetration is an appeal to God’s goodness asking for spiritual or temporal well-being for ourselves or others.  By impetratory prayer we beg God for benefits. By propitiatory prayer we beg Him for mercy and forgiveness.

Throughout the ages people have wondered whether it makes any sense to pray to God at all.

After all, God is omniscient and eternal. He is not limited by past, present or future.  His being and will and knowledge are one and the same.  God, being perfect, is unchangeable. He orders all things to their proper end, which is what we call divine providence. What God knows will come to pass must necessarily come to pass.  God is utterly transcendent.  We cannot bend God to our will.

Does it make any sense or any difference to offer prayers to such a God?

Various solutions to this problem have been proposed.  Some ancient thinkers held that human affairs are not ruled by any divine providence and it is therefore useless to pray to or worship any god.  Others held that all things, including human affairs, happen from necessity, whether by reason of the immutability of divine providence, or through the compelling influence of the stars, cosmic or physical forces, etc.  This view similarly renders prayer pointless.  Others held that divine providence indeed rules human affairs and things do not happen of necessity, but they thought that God and His providence is mutable, and can be changed by rites and prayers.

In figuring out what to pray and how, and even why to pray at all, we Catholics must account for the usefulness and effectiveness of prayer in such a way as to avoid imposing fatalistic necessity on human affairs and also to avoid any suggestion that God is changeable, fickle, malleable.

In His earthly life Jesus, God with us, demonstrated that prayers are effective.  He was moved by His Mother at Cana to change water to wine, by the Syro-Phoenician woman to exorcise her daughter, by the Good Thief to remember him in His Kingdom, and by many others.  We know that saints can intercede for us and obtain favors from God.  Our Lord Himself prayed.  He Himself taught us to pray and to ask for things and to beg mercy.

St. Thomas Aquinas (+1274) drills into the problem of whether it is useful to pray to God (STh II, IIae, q. 83, a. 2) saying, “We pray not that we may change the divine disposition, but that we may impetrate that which God has disposed to be fulfilled by our prayers, in other words, ‘that by asking, men may deserve to receive what Almighty God from eternity has disposed to give’ (St. Gregory, Dialogues)…”.  The same applies to begging for God’s mercy (propitiatory prayer), which we can do with confidence.

Our prayer should be raised to God with humility and gratitude for what we know He has disposed in His divine providence. He grants favors according to what from all eternity He has known about us, our needs and disposition.  Our prayers are good for us.

Confidently but humbly, boldly but without presumption, raise your cares and petitions to God without treating Him as if He were a cosmic concierge.

28 posted on 09/16/2012 2:03:06 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Comment #29 Removed by Moderator

To: RegulatorCountry
St. Cornelius, Pope and Martyr & St. Cyprian, Bishop and Martyr

St. Cornelius
Pope and Martyr
&
St. Cyprian
Bishop and Martyr
Memorial
September 16th

 

History:

St. Cornelius reigned two years, three months, and ten days as pope before being martyred.

St. Cyprian, Bishop and martyr. He was the first Bishop of Carthage to obtain the crown of martyrdom.

Collect:
O God, who gave Saints Cornelius and Cyprian to your people
as diligent shepherds and valiant Martyrs,
grant that through their intercession
we may be strengthened in faith and constancy
and spend ourselves without reserve
for the unity of the Church.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: 2 Corinthians 4:7-15
But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, to show that the transcendent power belongs to God and not to us.

We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. For while we live we are always being given up to death for Jesus' sake, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you.

Since we have the same spirit of faith as he had who wrote, "I believed, and so I spoke," we too believe, and so we speak, knowing that he who raised the Lord Jesus will raise us also with Jesus and bring us with you into his presence. For it is all for your sake, so that as grace extends to more and more people it may increase thanksgiving, to the glory of God.

Gospel Reading: John 17:11-19
[Jesus said] Now I am no more in the world, but they are in the world, and I am coming to thee. Holy Father, keep them in thy name, which thou hast given me, that they may be one, even as we are one. While I was with them, I kept them in thy name, which thou hast given me; I have guarded them, and none of them is lost but the son of perdition, that the scripture might be fulfilled. But now I am coming to thee; and these things I speak in the world, that they may have my joy fulfilled in themselves. I have given them thy word; and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. I do not pray that thou shouldst take them out of the world, but that thou shouldst keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. Sanctify them in the truth; thy word is truth. As thou didst send me into the world, so I have sent them into the world. And for their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be consecrated in truth. 


Related Link on EWTN website: The Lord's Prayer by St. Cyprian

Related links on New Advent Website:

Writings from and about St. Cyprian

- The Life and Passion of Cyprian by Pontius the Deacon
- The Epistles of Cyprian
- The Treatises of Cyprian
- The Seventh Council of Carthage


30 posted on 09/16/2012 7:20:39 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pope Cornelius - 251-253 a.d.[Martyr]
31 posted on 09/16/2012 7:24:48 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
The Sunday liturgy supersedes the celebration of saints' days.

Cyprian of Carthage on the Incarnation
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
St. Cyprian of Carthage

32 posted on 09/16/2012 7:26:02 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Cyprian
Feast Day: September 16
Died: 253
Patron of: against earache, against epilepsy, against fever, against twitching, cattle, domestic animals, earache sufferers



33 posted on 09/16/2012 7:34:21 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Cyprian
Feast Day: September 16
Born: 3rd century AD, North Africa
Died: September 14, 258, Carthage, Africa Province, Roman Empire
Patron of: Algeria, North Africa



34 posted on 09/16/2012 7:35:16 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Cornelius and St. Cyprian

St. Cornelius
Feast Day: September 16
Born: (around) 200 :: Died: 253/258

In the middle of the third century, which is around the year 250 the Church was still being badly treated and Christians were being killed.

Emperor Decius put Pope St. Fabian to death and the Church was without a pope for nearly a year.

A holy priest of Rome, Cornelius, was elected in 251. He was willing to become Pope because he loved Christ. He would serve the Church as pope even if it meant he might die. That is why Pope Cornelius was so greatly admired throughout the world.

The bishops of Africa spoke bravely about their love and loyalty to the pope. Bishop Cyprian of Carthage sent him letters of encouragement and support.

Cyprian who was a non-Catholic, converted and became a Catholic at the age of twenty-five. He later became a priest and in 249 he became a bishop.

Bishop Cyprian encouraged Pope Cornelius by reminding him that even though their lives were in danger, in Rome not a single Christian had given up the faith.

St. Cyprian's writings explain the love that Christians should have for the whole Church. This love should be for the pope as well as for their parish. Cyprian wrote a book on the unity of the Church which is important to us even today.

Pope St. Cornelius was sent away to the port of Rome where he died in September, 253. Because he suffered so much as pope, he is considered a martyr.

St. Cyprian died five years later when they chopped off his head on September 14, 258.

Together they share a feast day to remind us of the unity that the Church should always enjoy. This unity is a mark of the presence of Jesus who is the Center.

So today, let us specially pray for unity among people of different cultures, races, nations, and religions.


35 posted on 09/16/2012 7:40:36 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, September 16

Liturgical Color: Green


Today is the Memorial of St. Cornelius, pope and martyr, and St. Cyprian, bishop and martyr. Together they worked to restore lapsed Catholics who abandoned the faith to avoid persecution in the third century.


36 posted on 09/16/2012 3:41:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: September 16, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Look upon us, O God, Creator and ruler of all things, and, that we may feel the working of your mercy, grant that we may serve you With all our heart. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: September 16th

Twenty-Fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time

 Old Calendar: Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

And Jesus went on with his disciples, to the villages of Caesare'a Philip'pi; and on the way he asked his disciples, "Who do men say that I am?" And they told him, "John the Baptist; and others say, Eli'jah; and others one of the prophets." And he asked them, "But who do you say that I am?" Peter answered him, "You are the Christ." And he charged them to tell no one about him (Mark 8:27-30).

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah 50:5-9. The prophet Issiah describes some of the sufferings which the Messiah will endure.

The second reading is from the Letter of St. James 2:14-18 and is a continuation of the practical guidance we heard two Sundays ago. Christians must be "doers of the word not hearers only."

The Gospel is from St. Mark 8:27-35. We need not be surprised at the slowness of the Apostles in grasping the messiahship of Jesus. He did not want the crowds who flocked to him to know this until later — after his resurrection — because they had the idea that the Messiah would be a political leader who would set them free from their subjection to pagan Rome. It was not until this occasion, near Caesarea Philippi, somewhat over a year after he had called them, that he admitted to his Apostles that he was the Messiah. He charged them not to make this fact known outside of their own limited circle. To forestall and erase any wrong ideas of a political leader which some of the Apostles might have, he immediately foretold the sufferings and death he would have to endure at the hands of the leaders of the Jews. He would be conquered and humiliated by his enemies but their victory would be short-lived -- death would not hold him -- he would rise triumphant on the third day.

To the Apostles this seemed incredible and Peter, their spokesman, told him so. This outlook of the Apostles is also very understandable. They had seen him work many miracles, God was evidently very near to him: how could God let his enemies humiliate and kill him? They did not know God's plan, they were fishermen and knew little if anything of the Old Testament messianic prophecies. Had they read of the Suffering Servant in second-Isaiah they would not have disbelieved the prophecy of his forthcoming sufferings, death and resurrection. And his mention of his resurrection after three days, which would prove that it was he and not his enemies who conquered, fell on deaf ears, because the idea of a resurrection of that kind was incomprehensible to them. We know how slow they were to accept his resurrection even after it had happened.

Although the message was only vaguely and dubiously grasped, Christ had forewarned his Apostles (he repeated this twice later: Mk. 9: 9-10; 31-32 and 10: 32-34), so as to prepare them for the scandal of the cross. While it did not really prepare them because they were still too worldly-minded, it did help to strengthen their faith once the facts convinced them of the resurrection. They then realized that their beloved Master was more than Messiah, that he was in fact the Son of God, who with knowledge aforethought freely accepted his humiliations and shameful death for their sakes and ours. They gladly gave their lives to bringing this news of God's great love for men to all nations. From being a scandal the cross became the emblem and the proud standard of God's love for mankind.

We are in the happy position of the Apostles after the resurrection of Jesus. We know how much God loves us; we appreciate the humiliation that the incarnation brought on his beloved Son and the sufferings and cruel death which the sins of the world, ours included, brought on the Son of God. All of this took place because God wished to make us his adopted sons and worthy of the inheritance he had planned for us. For a faithful and grateful Christian, however, theoretical appreciation is not enough. Atonement has been made for our sins, but we have still a very important part to play. Our sins can be forgiven but we must truly repent of them before God will forgive them.

St. Mark adds some words of Christ which illustrate what practical form our appreciation and gratitude for Christ's sufferings should take. We must be ready to follow him on the road to Calvary. We must deny ourselves — deprive ourselves not only of sinful pleasure or gain, but even of lawful things at times, in order to be Christ-like. We must take up our cross and follow him. This does not mean that we must search for crosses — there are plenty of them in any good Christian's life — but we must gladly accept the crosses life brings us and see in them God's means of keeping us close to him.

Life on earth is very short, eternal life is endless. No thinking man, and certainly no true Christian, would risk losing the eternal life for the sake of a few paltry gains or a few extra years here below.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


37 posted on 09/16/2012 4:31:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 8:27-35

24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Get behind me, Satan.” (Mark 8:33)

Wouldn’t you hate to hear Jesus say these words to you? You can just imagine the look on Peter’s face when Jesus rebuked him. He must have gone from a beaming smile to a forlorn frown in a matter of seconds.

Did Peter love Jesus when he said: “You are the Christ”? Yes! Did he love Jesus when he urged him to avoid the cross? Yes! Peter loved Jesus with his whole heart on both occasions, even though the first response came from God, and the second one didn’t.

If it was hard for the great St. Peter to recognize the difference between godly truth and ungodly temptation, what hope could there possibly be for us? Sure, there are times when it’s not hard to spot the influence of the devil. But what about those times when we feel we are being sincere and honest, but we’re still wrong?

What about those times when we say something out of a good motivation, but it ends up being the wrong thing at the wrong time?

The first thing we need to do is admit that we don’t always get it right. We’re going to make mistakes and hurt people, even when we have good intentions. There will even be times, humbling though they may be, when our good intentions end up serving devilish purposes. Praise God for his mercy and patience!

Second, we need to know that the Holy Spirit wants to teach us how to live. St. Paul tells us that no mat­ter how inscrutable the wisdom of God may be, “we have the mind of Christ.” This means we really can learn how to discern spiritual things (1 Corinthians 2:14, 16).

Over time, Peter learned how to discern God’s voice. He learned how to sort through his intentions and be a clearer instrument of God’s grace. We can, too. Just keep telling yourself: “I have the mind of Christ. I believe that the Holy Spirit is my guide.” With this little statement of faith, you can develop the gift of discernment.

“Lord, show me your ways so that I may discern your will.”

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. The first reading from Isaiah offers a prophetic foreshadowing of the passion of Jesus Christ. It also provides insights into the mind of a man of faith who knows that no matter what he may suffer, “The Lord God is my help, therefore, I am not disgraced,” “I shall not be put to shame,” “He is near who upholds my right.” When you experience difficulties and suffering, what role does your faith in Jesus Christ play in how you respond? What steps can you take to allow your faith to have a greater impact on your response?

2. The Responsorial Psalm speaks of how gracious and merciful and caring the Lord’s is in the midst of great “distress and sorrow.” In what way is this Psalm also a psalm of hope and trust in the Lord? Share some times from your own life when the Lord “has heard my voice in supplication” and “inclined his ear to me the day I called.”

3. In the second reading, James tells us that “faith of itself, if it does not have works, is dead.” He goes on to say, “Demonstrate your faith to me without works, and I will demonstrate my faith from my works.” Why are works a demonstration of our faith? If you were put on trial to prove you are a Christian from your works, would there be enough evidence for a conviction?

4. The Catechism (no. 161) states that “Believing in Jesus Christ and in the one who sent him for our salvation is necessary for obtaining that salvation … therefore without faith no one has ever attained justification, nor will anyone obtain eternal life ‘but he who endures to the end.’” How would you relate these words on the importance of faith to James’ words on the importance of works?

5. In the Gospel, Jesus tells the disciples and the crowd (and us) these words, “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and that of the gospel will save it.” What do you think these words mean and how do they apply to you?

6. In the meditation, we hear these words, “St. Paul tells us that no matter how inscrutable the wisdom of God may be, ‘we have the mind of Christ.’ This means we really can learn how to discern spiritual things (1 Corinthians 2:14, 16).” Do you believe that you have the mind of Christ and, therefore, are able to “discern spiritual things”? What are some of the characteristics of the way the Holy Spirit would speak to our minds, compared to the characteristics of how the devil (or our misled thoughts) might speak to us? Give some examples.

7. Take some time now to pray for a deepening of the spiritual gift of discernment. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.

Isaiah 50:4-9; Psalm 116:1-6, 8-9; James 2:14-18


38 posted on 09/16/2012 4:35:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WHO DO YOU SAY THAT I AM?

(A biblical refection on THE 24th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 16 September, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 8:27-35 

First Reading: Is 50:5-9; Psalms: Ps 115:1-6,8-9; Second Reading: Jas 2:14:18 

The Scripture Text

And Jesus went on with His disciples, to the villages of Caesarea Philippi; and on the way He asked His disciples, “Who do men say that I am? And they told Him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others one of the prophets.” And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered Him, “You are the Christ.” And He charged them to tell no one about Him. 

And He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. And He said this plainly. And Peter took Him, and began to rebuke Him. But turning and seeing His disciples, He rebuked Peter, and said, “Get behind Me, Satan! For you are not on the side of God, but of men.” 

And He called to Him the multitude with His disciples, and said to them, “If any man would come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For who ever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for My sake and the Gospel’s will save it. (Mk 8:27:35 RSV) 

Shortly after He fed the multitude (Mk 8:1-10), Jesus took His disciples away to Caesarea Philippi, about twenty-five miles north of the Sea of Galilee. There He asked them who they thought He was. Peter, inspired by God, said: “You are the Messiah” (= Christ; Mk 8:16).

Peter’s confession marks a turning point in Mark’s Gospel. Prior to this, Jesus was portrayed as a popular preacher and compassionate healer. From this point on, events were dominated by the ominous shadow of the cross. Three times Jesus predicted that He would suffer and die (Mk 8:31; 9:31; 10:32-34). Each time He called Himself the Son of Man (a reference to the heavenly figure in Daniel 7:13). The Son of Man in Daniel is both a heavenly man and a figure representing the people of God (Dan 7:18,27). When Jesus used this title, He was not only indicating that He must suffer, but also that this is the path to which we are called if we wish to follow Him. How often our own ideas of Jesus fall short of this and center instead on things which challenge us less.

The Son of Man is also like another figure in the Old Testament – the suffering servant of Isaiah. This servant set his face like flint (Is 50:7), gave his back to those who struck him (Is 50:6), and bore the iniquity of us all (Is 53:6). Jesus is the true servant, but we too are servants if we accept and follow His path of suffering.

Jesus’ message is not all suffering. If we follow Him in His suffering, we will also share His reward and bring His resurrection victory to others (Is 53:11-12). Saint Mark recognized this central truth and balanced the three predictions of the Son of Man’s passion with three predictions of the Son of Man’s resurrection (Mk 8:38; 13:26; 14:62).

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, I believe that You are the Son of God, Second Person of the Holy Trinity. You are truly God and truly Man. As God-man You are my Savior, my divine Model, and my invisible Companion every step of my earthly path toward eternal life. Let me become ever more aware of this truth, and my spiritual progress will improve. Amen. 


39 posted on 09/16/2012 5:31:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF JESUS?

(A biblical refection on THE 24th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 16 September, 2012) 

First Reading: Is 50:4-9; Psalms: Ps 115:1-6,8-9; Second Reading: Jas 2:14-18; Gospel Reading: Mk 8:27-35 

The setting for today’s Gospel narrative is the flower-covered foothills of misty snowcapped Mount Hermon. There Jesus and the twelve apostles discuss His identity. As they walk near the source of the Jordan River, He calmly asks, “Who do people say that I am?” After hearing their varied responses, the Master replies with another question: “Who do you say that I am?” First Jesus asked what they had heard about Him from others, now He wants to know what they think of Him.

The general public saw Him as the reincarnation of John the Baptist, Elijah or some prophet. Jesus’ close friends, however, acknowledged Him as he long-promise Messiah.

How do people see Jesus today? Many (like Christians) say He’s God. Others (like Jews and Moslems) say He’s great man but not God. Some see Him as a friend and love Him. Others view Him as a judge and fear Him. Many try to imitate Jesus by praying much in church. Others say they act like Him when they’re working for human rights and arms reduction. Some thing His teachings are strict. Others say He’s lenient.

As current disciples, how would we answer Jesus if He asked us what people say about Him? We would have to reply that they say almost everything imaginable – all the way from believing that He lives in each person and directs every thought and action, to the belief that He doesn’t exist at all.

The first question about the public’s view is intriguing, but the second one is more vital and personal. What do you thing about Jesus? Don’t quote some book or authority. Just answer from your own honest belief. Is He really God? Did He die for you? Does He know your name? Do you see Him in your neighbour; feel Him in yourself; hear Him in the words of scripture; sense His presence in the Eucharist? Can you relax with Him or does He scare you? Perhaps we feel like Pilate, who after a brief encounter with Him asked publicly, “What am I to do with Jesus?”

Peter triumphantly call Him “Messiah,” but rejects the thought of a suffering Messiah. Jesus dramatically corrects him. Today’s Gospel concludes with Jesus calling together both the crowd and the twelve to remind them, “If a man wishes to come after Me, he must deny his very self, take up his cross and follow in My steps.” I believe Jesus is demanding yet understanding. I believe He’s a fair judge yet a personal friend. I believe He’s a profound, unfolding mystery. What do you think?


40 posted on 09/16/2012 5:39:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for September 16, 2012:

“Who do people say that I am?” (Mk 8:27) Just as our public persona does not always reflect our true self, spouses are privy to the hidden truth/weaknesses of each other. What do you know about your beloved that perhaps no one else does? Honor this privileged information.


41 posted on 09/16/2012 5:45:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time  -  Cycle B

September 9, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 35:4-7a

Psalm: 146:7-10

Second Reading: James 2:1-5

Gospel Reading: Mark 7:31-37

  • Jesus has just come from Gentile territory (the Gentile coastal towns of Tyre and Sidon) where he has healed a Canaanite woman’s daughter of a demon (Mark 7:24-30).
  • In this Sundays episode—which appears only in Mark—he is in Gentile lands again; the region of the Decapolis, a confederation of 10 cities just east of the Sea of Galilee. Ironically, this confederation was founded in part to discourage Jewish incursions.
  • Jesus’ manner of healing often takes on a sacramental aspect; that is, he incorporates the material into healings done by his Divine power. Similarly, the Sacraments of the Church are not only signs, but signs that effect (actually accomplish) what they signify; for example: the saving power of Baptism through water and the Holy Spirit (John 3:5; 1 Peter 3:21).
  • Even though Jesus takes pains to conceal his identity (verses 33, 36; also Mark 1:25, 5:43; CCC 439), it is clear that his actions fulfill the Old Testament prophecies of the coming Messiah (Luke 4:1-6; Isaiah 35:4-6; Wisdom 10:21; CCC 549).

 

QUESTIONS:

  • In the 1st Reading, what message did Isaiah have for believers who might have begun to falter in their hope? What are some of the miraculous signs which will identify the coming of the Kingdom of God in these verses? In what ways were they fulfilled by Jesus?
  • In reference to the 2nd Reading, how do you behave when the opportunity arises to meet someone famous or wealthy? What association do you have with the poor? Of the two, whose company do you prefer? According to Scripture, what advantages do the poor have that the rich lack?
  • It seems Jesus goes out of his way to reach this specific individual to heal him (verse 31). What does that tell you about Jesus?
  • What do you think is the significance of Jesus looking up to heaven and sighing right before he heals the man (Mark 8:11-13)? Could it be related to verses 33a and 36?
  • Why do you think Jesus used the method he did to heal the man? How is the response of these Gentiles (verse 37) like that of the Jews (1:27; 2:12) and the disciples (4:41)? What do you think is Mark’s point in emphasizing this?
  • Why do you think that Jesus took the man aside to heal him in private? How has Jesus dealt privately with you (rather than treating you as part of a group)?
  • In the liturgy (as in the hymn Veni Creator), the Holy Spirit is compared to the finger of God (verse 33). What are the effects that the Holy Spirit has on us that are comparable to the effects that Christ had on the man that was healed (CCC 683, 687)? For us to believe, what must God first do for us (CCC 153)?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 1504, 1151

“Thou who are sevenfold in thy grace,/Finger of God’s right hand,/His Promise, teaching little ones/To speak and understand.”   ~From Veni Creator, an ancient hymn in praise of the Holy Spirit


42 posted on 09/16/2012 6:08:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Who Do You Say That I Am?
Pastor’s Column
September 16, 2012
24th Sunday Ordinary Time
 
“And he asked them, ‘but who do you say that I am?’”
                                                                                (from Matthew 8:27-35)
 
          Who do you say that I am? This gospel always reminds me of a “pop-quiz” that teachers use to check on the progress of their students! One can imagine the disciples and Jesus enjoying an evening meal, perhaps by a fire, just relaxing after a successful day of preaching and healing. In the course of a simple conversation, Jesus asks a very innocent question, “Who do the people say that I am?”
 
          Who do the people say that I am? Many answers are forthcoming: “Some say John the Baptist or Elijah or a prophet!” Perhaps they were laughing as they tried to come up with all the different takes on Christ. This is still true today! People see Jesus from many angles in this world: a savior, a threat to personal liberty, a heretic, a good man, a philosopher, someone to ignore, a Good Shepherd, a friend. Although we are all called to spread the good news of who Jesus really is, Jesus is not interested in this at the moment in the gospel: rather, he zeroes in on precisely who each person present—his close disciples--think Jesus is. How would we answer this question?
 
          Who do you say that I am? We answer this question by how we live! For example, if I only attend church when no better offer comes along (like a sunny day at the beach or a football game), or I habitually leave church early without a good reason, or do not pray on a regular basis, one can conclude that Jesus is not #1 in my life—that which I give priority in my life to is perhaps more of a “lord” than Christ is!
 
          Who do you say that I am?  Jesus appears in many forms besides his sacramental presence in the Eucharist! For example, the sick child, parent or spouse I am caring for, the homeless and unemployed I gave food to, the unborn that I am trying to protect in a world that seems to place little value in them. Jesus is present in the terribly persecuted Christians in Syria and other places… did I see him there? 
 
          Who do you say that I am? When I am grateful for what I like, and especially what I don’t like (at the moment) in my life, I really am saying to Jesus, you are the Lord! Jesus is looking for a few good friends that really trust him in every age. He constantly challenges us, through the circumstances of each day, to recognize by our daily choices who we are saying that Jesus really is in our lives.
 
                                                                            Father Gary

43 posted on 09/16/2012 6:12:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Following the Messiah: Reflections on the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Following the Messiah: Reflections on the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 09.13.12 |


Holy Face of Jesus

In today’s Gospel, we reach a pivotal moment in our walk with the Lord. After weeks of listening to His words and witnessing His deeds, along with the disciples we’re asked to decide who Jesus truly is. 

Peter answers for them, and for us, too, when he declares: “You are the Messiah.” 

Many expected the Messiah to be a miracle worker who would vanquish Israel’s enemies and restore the kingdom of David (see John 6:15). 

Jesus today reveals a different portrait. He calls himself the Son of Man, evoking the royal figure Daniel saw in his heavenly visions (see Daniel 7:13-14). But Jesus’ kingship is not to be of this world (see John 18:36). And the path to His throne, as He reveals, is by way of suffering and death. 

Readings:
Isaiah 50:4-9
Psalm 116:1-6, 8-9
James 2:14-18
Mark 8:27-35

Jesus identifies the Messiah with the suffering servant that Isaiah foretells in today’s First Reading. The words of Isaiah’s servant are Jesus’ words—as He gives himself to be shamed and beaten, trusting that God will be His help. We hear our Lord’s voice again in today’s Psalm, as He gives thanks that God has freed Him from the cords of death. 

As Jesus tells us today, to believe that He is the Messiah is to follow His way of self-denial—losing our lives to save them, in order to rise with Him to new life. Our faith, we hear again in today’s Epistle, must express itself in works of love (see Galatians 5:6). 

Notice that Jesus questions the apostles today “along the way.” They are on the way to Jerusalem, where the Lord will lay down His life. We, too, are on a journey with the Lord. 

We must take up our cross, giving to others and enduring all our trials for His sake and the sake of the gospel.  Our lives must be an offering of thanksgiving for the new life He has given us, until that day when we reach our destination, and walk before the Lord in the land of the living. 

 

44 posted on 09/16/2012 6:31:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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24th Sunday - The mark of a disciple

24th Sunday -- The Mark of a Disiciple
 


Hill of Crosses - Lithuania
 
"Whoever wishes to come after me . . . must take up his cross and follow."
 

 
Is 50: 4 -9
Jm 2: 14-18
Mk 8: 27-35
 
In the northern part of the Lithuanian countryside stands a shrine called the “Hill of Crosses.” Of all the three Baltic States, Lithuania suffered the most from the 70 years of Communist oppression.  Likely due to its strategic location but even more to its strong Catholic identity.  Like Poland, more than 90% of the population are Catholic. 

The Hill of Crosses, even to this day, has become a symbol both of faith and defiance. Covering acres of gentle rolling hills in the green country side are what is likely millions of crosses of all sizes, shapes and styles.  They were placed there by faith filled citizens of the Country originally as an act of defiance against an oppressive occupying government which did all they could to stamp out the practice of the Catholic faith. Three times the Communist government mowed down the crosses and three times they reappeared until the oppressors finally gave up. 

Since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1989 and the Baltic States were once again free, more crosses than ever have been placed on the hills.  There are pathways which wander through the dense mountain of crosses and you can reflect not only on its unique cultural beauty but even more on how willing the Lithuanians, like so many others oppressed by atheistic control, were willing to pick up their crosses and carry them.

In our Gospel this Sunday (Mk 8: 27-35) we hear Jesus say: “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me . . .” How often have we heard this basic challenge of Jesus to all Christians who would be his followers.  Placed in the context of Jesus’ words to Peter and the other Apostles this Sunday, “He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer greatly . . . and be killed, and rise after three days . . .” the mandate that suffering has a certain meaning and purpose when endured and accepted for a higher purpose.  In Jesus’ case it was salvation for humankind.  In our case, in can be a road to grace, character formation, spiritual discipline, and ultimate union with God in heaven. But, what a price to pay we say. Yet, the cross is the indispensable sign of Christianity.

In the Gospel, Peter proclaims that Jesus is “the Christ.” This is Marks version of the more expanded conversation that Jesus has with Peter when he proclaims, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God . . .” (Mt 16: 16) and Jesus entrusts the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven to him – the scriptural foundation of the Papacy. But then, as in Mark, he qualifies the meaning of Messiah as one who must bring change and redemption through suffering – the Paschal mystery as we call it.

In support of the Gospel, our first reading from Isaiah presents the image of the suffering servant: “. . . I gave my back to those who beat me, my cheeks to those who plucked my beard, my face I did not shield from buffets and spitting . . .” This decidedly Good Friday imagery foreshadows Jesus words that his mission is to embrace the Cross for humankind.  As we see in the intrepid Lithuanians, he is determined to plant his cross on the hillside of Calvary. 

One perspective of all this is to leave him there alone.  This was something only God could do and so Jesus’ cross is solely his. But it is clear from the Gospel that his cross and our “cross” is meant to be connected.  We live in our very self-reliant, independent culture.  The “self-made man” still lives as a sign of success although we may not speak in that direct manner. But in the ancient Middle Eastern culture of Jesus’ day, one’s identity is measured by the group one is attached to. In that group loyalty is demanded and leadership is established.

We all belong to a group called the Catholic Church.  In that same group, a certain loyalty is expected and leadership has been established since the time of Jesus.  While there is certainly a measure of independence due to our differing personalities and viewpoints, in the end we all must make the same decision the Apostles themselves had to make when they heard Jesus refer to Peter: “Get behind me Satan . . .” Tough and painful words to be sure.

Peter’s misunderstanding of Jesus’ mission and his more worldly perspective as to the meaning of success for Jesus is at the root of our Lord’s rebuke: “You are thinking . . . as human beings do.” It seemed that Jesus’ message to Peter was, “Either you change your attitude or go back to fishing!”  Ouch!

But our cross is Jesus’ cross or so it can be for us; albeit with less suffering but nonetheless tough to endure at times.  I recently heard from a parishioner that a friend of hers told her his daughter had recently discovered the child in her womb had died.  Only a woman and mother could understand such pain and disappointment.  That is a cross she has been asked to carry.

Many these days find themselves in search of employment.  Their financial future is uncertain, their self-image is injured, their families are fearful of future security.  That too is a cross many have been asked to carry.

Our good health is sometimes taken for granted until we are suddenly faced with weakness.  That cross is not uncommon by any means.  And on it goes in each of our lives.

Are we with Peter? Are we somehow confused about the purpose of our crosses – “Why would this happen to me?” 

Yet, it is through the passion and suffering of Our Lord that God brought glory and resurrection.  Only in the face of suffering, in whatever form we find ourselves, can we come to know the power of God and attach ourselves, as members of the Christian-Catholic family, as loyal sons and daughters of our suffering and glorified Christ.
Upon what hill will you place your cross?
 
Fr. Tim

45 posted on 09/16/2012 6:42:30 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

Jesus the Christ, the Son of Man, and the Suffering Servant

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for September 16, 2012, the Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
Is 50:5-9a

Ps 116:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9

Jas 2:14-18

Mk 8:27-35

A triptych—from the Greek word meaning “three-fold”—was a form of artwork that emerged in the early centuries of Christianity and became popular during the Middle Ages. It consisted of three panels, which folded together and were often used as altar paintings, usually depicting the Crucifixion, with artwork of Christ on the Cross featured on the middle panel.

Today’s Gospel reading is a sort of spiritual triptych, for it naturally divides into three small sections, each of which features or alludes to a name or descriptive of Jesus. Each tells us something about his person and mission; each is oriented toward his Passion and his salvific death on the Cross.

The first name or title is Christ, or Messiah. In a well-known scene (described in more detail in Matthew 16), Jesus asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” After hearing the various answers, he asked them directly: “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answers for the disciples succinctly: “You are the Christ.” While his answer may have been verbally short, it was long on meaning.

This name appears some five hundred and thirty times in the Old Testament. The Hebrew word has a complex history; it refers to an “anointed one,” as well as to a royal figure, often associated in some way with King David, who will come at the end of time to establish God’s reign. In the Old Testament, anointing with oil had a deep religious significance, representing God’s divine election of a man to a specific office or task.

From the time the prophet Samuel had anointed Saul as king, each king of Israel had been an “anointed one.” But there hadn’t been an Israelite king for nearly six centuries prior to the time of Christ; the Israelites had instead been ruled by foreign rulers, often cruel and unjust.  As Mary Healy notes in her commentary on the Gospel of Mark, “For Peter to acknowledge Jesus as Messiah means, ‘You are the one through whom God will accomplish all that he promised!’” (Baker Academic, 2008).

Jesus then began to teach them about his approaching arrest, Passion, death, and Resurrection, using the second name of our triptych: the Son of Man. This title was one used most often by Jesus about himself (it appears ninety times in the New Testament), especially when foretelling his Passion. On one hand, it emphasizes the humanity of Christ. But it also refers to the prophet Daniel’s vision of final judgment, when the clouds of heaven open and “came one like a son of man, and he came to the Ancient of Days and was presented before him” (Dan. 7:13). This mysterious figure is also royal, a king who suffers for the sake of the people and who is then vindicated by God at the end of time and history, a dramatic event described by Jesus (Matt. 25:31-34) and John the Revelator (Rev. 1:12-18). Paradoxically, “Son of Man” refers to both lowly humanity and dazzling power.

The third title is one drawn from the prophet Isaiah and from Jesus’ teachings about self-denial and taking up the Cross: the Suffering Servant. He is described in today’s reading from the prophet Isaiah as the man willing to endure torment and mockery for the sake of the Lord. The most famous and full description is found in Isaiah 52-53, which is read on Good Friday.

Jesus again made the connection to Isaiah’s prophecy later in Mark’s Gospel, “For the Son of man also came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mk. 10:45). Reflecting on the Cross, St. Augustine wrote, “There is no other way for you to follow the Lord except by carrying it, for how can you follow him if you are not his?”

The Christ. The Son of Man. The Suffering Servant. Each name is a work of theological art, revealing Jesus and his love to us.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the September 13, 2009, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


46 posted on 09/16/2012 6:54:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Regnum Christi

Getting to Know the Lord
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time



Father Robert Presutti

Mark 8:27-35
Now Jesus and his disciples set out for the villages of Caesarea Philippi. Along the way he asked his disciples, "Who do people say that I am?" They said in reply, "John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others one of the prophets." And he asked them, "But who do you say that I am?" Peter said to him in reply, "You are the Messiah." Then he warned them not to tell anyone about him. He began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer greatly and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and rise after three days. He spoke this openly. Then Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. At this he turned around and, looking at his disciples, rebuked Peter and said, "Get behind me, Satan. You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do." He summoned the crowd with his disciples and said to them, "Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and that of the Gospel will save it."

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, I believe that you came into this world to redeem sinners. I hope in you, and in your power to transform my soul, by your grace, from sinfulness to holiness. Lord, I love you and offer you the longings of my heart to put you truly first in my life. I want to love you with all my mind, heart, soul and strength.

Petition: Lord Jesus, help me to know you and to follow closely after you.

1. A Pop Quiz: Jesus asks his disciples a question completely out of the blue: “Who do people say that I am?” Christ really wants to know who his disciples thought he was. Yet he leads them by degree to the tougher and more committing questions. The first question – who do people say I am – provokes thought and is easy to answer; all the disciples participate in the answer. The second question requires something more. It involves that introspection and self-examination that closeness to Christ always provokes. Only Peter had the courage to respond. Like the disciples in the Gospel, throughout our own spiritual journey Christ will give us surprise examinations and pop quizzes – moments when we, too, will be asked to evaluate who Jesus really is for each of us.

2. Judging by God’s Standards: Like the disciples in the Gospel, the closer we draw to Christ, the more he reveals himself. Once the disciples know and accept Jesus as the Messiah, it is important they know the type of Messiah he is. Many misconceptions abound, and all conceive of the Messiah in terms that are all too human. He is not the political liberator who will cast off the Roman dominion and make life “easy.” Rather, he is the Redeemer of the human person. In no uncertain terms, Jesus makes it clear to Peter and the disciples that the Messiah is the Suffering Servant of Yahweh, who must suffer greatly and be rejected.

3. Bound to Christ by the Cross: Peter thought he was doing Christ a favor by trying to dissuade him from the suffering he predicted would be coming. Yet Peter received the surprise of his life. His well-intentioned but completely misinformed attempt got him the worst possible rebuke from Christ, “Get behind me, Satan.” Christ makes it clear that his disciples must be ready to follow in his footsteps. The path to salvation necessarily leads through the sorrow and joy of the cross.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, conform my heart to yours. Help me to value events and things the way you do. Help me love you above all things and be especially ready to follow you when it means a personal sacrifice or discomfort for me. Sustain me, Lord in my efforts to follow in your footsteps.

Resolution: Today I will accept difficulties with joy.


47 posted on 09/16/2012 7:03:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 8
27 And Jesus went out, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi. And in the way, he asked his disciples, saying to them: Whom do men say that I am? Et egressus est Jesus, et discipuli ejus in castella Cæsareæ Philippi : et in via interrogabat discipulos suos, dicens eis : Quem me dicunt esse homines ? και εξηλθεν ο ιησους και οι μαθηται αυτου εις τας κωμας καισαρειας της φιλιππου και εν τη οδω επηρωτα τους μαθητας αυτου λεγων αυτοις τινα με λεγουσιν οι ανθρωποι ειναι
28 Who answered him, saying: John the Baptist; but some Elias, and others as one of the prophets. Qui responderunt illi, dicentes : Joannem Baptistam, alii Eliam, alii vero quasi unum de prophetis. οι δε απεκριθησαν ιωαννην τον βαπτιστην και αλλοι ηλιαν αλλοι δε ενα των προφητων
29 Then he saith to them: But whom do you say that I am? Peter answering said to him: Thou art the Christ. Tunc dicit illis : Vos vero quem me esse dicitis ? Respondens Petrus, ait ei : Tu es Christus. και αυτος λεγει αυτοις υμεις δε τινα με λεγετε ειναι αποκριθεις δε ο πετρος λεγει αυτω συ ει ο χριστος
30 And he strictly charged them that they should not tell any man of him. Et comminatus est eis, ne cui dicerent de illo. και επετιμησεν αυτοις ινα μηδενι λεγωσιν περι αυτου
31 And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the ancients and by the high priests, and the scribes, and be killed: and after three days rise again. Et cœpit docere eos quoniam oportet Filium hominis pati multa, et reprobari a senioribus, et a summis sacerdotibus et scribis, et occidi : et post tres dies resurgere. και ηρξατο διδασκειν αυτους οτι δει τον υιον του ανθρωπου πολλα παθειν και αποδοκιμασθηναι απο των πρεσβυτερων και των αρχιερεων και των γραμματεων και αποκτανθηναι και μετα τρεις ημερας αναστηναι
32 And he spoke the word openly. And Peter taking him, began to rebuke him. Et palam verbum loquebatur. Et apprehendens eum Petrus, cœpit increpare eum. και παρρησια τον λογον ελαλει και προσλαβομενος αυτον ο πετρος ηρξατο επιτιμαν αυτω
33 Who turning about and seeing his disciples, threatened Peter, saying: Go behind me, Satan, because thou savorest not the things that are of God, but that are of men. Qui conversus, et videns discipulos suos, comminatus est Petro, dicens : Vade retro me Satana, quoniam non sapis quæ Dei sunt, sed quæ sunt hominum. ο δε επιστραφεις και ιδων τους μαθητας αυτου επετιμησεν τω πετρω λεγων υπαγε οπισω μου σατανα οτι ου φρονεις τα του θεου αλλα τα των ανθρωπων
34 And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. Et convocata turba cum discipulis suis, dixit eis : Si quis vult me sequi, deneget semetipsum : et tollat crucem suam, et sequatur me. και προσκαλεσαμενος τον οχλον συν τοις μαθηταις αυτου ειπεν αυτοις οστις θελει οπισω μου ακολουθειν απαρνησασθω εαυτον και αρατω τον σταυρον αυτου και ακολουθειτω μοι
35 For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. Qui enim voluerit animam suam salvam facere, perdet eam : qui autem perdiderit animam suam propter me, et Evangelium, salvam faciet eam. ος γαρ αν θελη την ψυχην αυτου σωσαι απολεσει αυτην ος δ αν απολεση την εαυτου ψυχην ενεκεν εμου και του ευαγγελιου ουτος σωσει αυτην

48 posted on 09/16/2012 7:05:47 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
27. And Jesus went out, arid his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi: and by the way he asked his disciples, saying to them, Whom do men say that I am?
28. And they answered, John the Baptist: but some say, Elias; and others, One of the prophets.
29. And he said to them, But whom say you that I am? And Peter answered and said to him, You are the Christ.
30. And he charged them that they should tell no man of him.
31. And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.
32. And he spoke that saying openly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him.
33. But when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, saying, Get thee behind me, Satan: for you savor not the things that be of God, but the things that be of men.

THEOPHYL. After taking His disciples afar from the Jews He then asks them concerning himself, that they might speak the truth without fear of the Jews; wherefore it is said, And Jesus entered, and his disciples, into the towns of Caesarea Philippi.

BEDE; Philip was that brother of Herod, of whom we spoke above, who in honor of Tiberius Caesar called that town, which is now called Paneas, Caesarea Philippi. It goes on, And by the way he asked his disciples, saying to them, Whom do men say that I am?

PSEUDO-CHRYS. He asks the question with a purpose, for it was right that His disciples should praise Him better than the crowd.

BEDE; Wherefore He first asks what is the opinion of men, in order to try the faith of the disciples, lest their confession should appear to be founded on the common opinion. It goes on, And they answered, saying, Some say John the Baptist, some Elias, and others, One of the prophets.

THEOPHYL. For many thought that John had risen from the dead, as even Herod believed, and that he had performed miracles after his resurrection. After how ever having inquired into the opinion of others, He asks them what was the belief of their own minds on this point; wherefore it continues, And he said to them, But whom say you that I am?

CHRYS. From the manner, however, itself, of the question, He heads them to a higher feeling, and to higher thoughts, concerning Him, that they might not agree with the multitude. But the next words show what the head of the disciples, the mouth of the Apostles, answered; when all were asked, Peter answers and said to to him, You are the Christ.

THEOPHYL. He confesses indeed that He is the Christ announced by the Prophets; but the Evangelist Mark passes over what the Lord answered to his confession, and how He blessed him, lest by this way of relating it, he should seem, to be favoring his Master Peter; Matthew plainly goes through the whole of it.

ORIGEN; Or else, Mark and Luke, as they wrote that Peter answered, You are the Christ, without adding what is put down in Matthew, the Son of the living God, so they omitted to relate the blessing which was conferred on this confession. It goes on, And he charged them that they should tell no man of him.

THEOPHYL. For He wished in the mean time to hide His glory, lest many should be offended because of Him, and so earn a worse punishment.

CHRYS. Or else, that He might wait to fix the pure faith in their minds, till the Crucifixion, which was an offense to them, was over for after it was once perfected, about the time of His ascension, He said unto the Apostles, Go you and teach all nations.

THEOPHYL. But after the Lord had accepted the confession of the disciples, who called Him the true God, He then reveals to them the mystery of the Cross. Wherefore it goes on, And he began to teach them that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders and of the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again; and he spoke that saying openly, that is, concerning His future passion. But His disciples did not understand the order of the truth, neither could they comprehend His resurrection, but thought it better that He should not suffer.

CHRYS. The reason, however, why the Lord told them this, was to show, that after His cross and resurrection, Christ must be preached by His witnesses. Again, Peter alone, from the fervor of his disposition had the boldness to dispute about these things. Wherefore it goes on, And Peter took him up, and began to rebuke him.

BEDE; This, however, he speaks with the feelings of a man who loves and desires; as if he said, Thus cannot he, neither can my ears receive that the Son of God us to be slain.

CHRYS. But how is this, that Peter, gifted with a revelation from the Father, has so soon fallen, and become unstable? Surely, however, it was not wonderful that one who had received no revelation concerning the Passion should be ignorant of this. For that He was the Christ the Son of the living God, he had learnt by revelation, but the mystery of His cross and resurrection had not yet been revealed to him. He Himself, however, showing that He must come to His Passion, rebuked Peter; wherefore there follows, And when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, &c.

THEOPHYL. For the Lord, wishing to show that His Passion was to take place on account of the salvation of men, and that Satan alone was unwilling that Christ should suffer, and the race of man be saved, called Peter Satan, because he savored the things that were of Satan, and, from unwillingness that Christ should suffer, became His adversary; for Satan is interpreted 'the adversary.'

PSEUDO-CHRYS. But He said not to the devil, when tempting Him, Get you behind me, but to Peter He said, Get you behind me, that is, follow Me, and resist not the design of My voluntary Passion. There follows, For you savour not the things which be of God, but which be of men.

THEOPHYL. He says that Peter savors the things which be of men, in that he in some way savored carnal affections, for Peter wished that Christ should spare Himself and riot be crucified.

34. And when he had called the people to him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.
35. For whoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the Gospel's, the same shall save it.

BEDE; After showing to His disciples the mystery of His passion and resurrection, He exhorts them, as well as the multitude, to follow the example of His passion. Wherefore it goes on; And when he had called the people to him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whoever wishes to come after me, let him deny himself.

CHRYS. As if He would in say to Peter, You indeed do rebuke Me, who am willing to undergo My passion, but I tell you, that not only is it wrong to prevent Me from suffering, but neither can you be saved unless you yourself die. Again He says, Whoever wished to come after me; as if He said, I call you to those good things which a man should wish for, I do not force you to evil and burdensome things; for he who does violence to his hearer, often stands in his way; but he who leaves him free, rather draws him to himself. And a man denies himself when He cares not for his body, so that whether it be scourged, or whatever of like nature it may suffer, he bears it patiently.

THEOPHYL. For a man who denies another, be it brother or father, does not sympathize with him, nor grieve at his fate, though He be wounded and die; thus we ought to despise our body, so that if it should be wounded or hurt in any way, we should not mind its suffering.

CHRYS. But He says not, a man should not spare himself, but what is more, that He should deny himself, as if He had nothing in common with himself, but face danger, and look upon such things as if another were suffering; and this is really to spare himself; for parents then most truly act kindly to their children, when they give them up to their masters, with an injunction not to spare them. Again, He shows the degree to which a man should deny himself, when He says, And take up his cross, by which He means, even to the most shameful death.

THEOPHYL. For at that time the cross appeared shameful, because malefactors were fixed to it.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Or else, as a skillful pilot, foreseeing a storm in a calm, wishes his sailors to be prepared; so also the Lord says, If any one will follow me, &c.

BEDE; For we deny r ourselves, when we avoid what we were of old, and strive to reach that point, whither we are newly called. And the cross is taken up by us, when either our body is pained by abstinence, or our soul afflicted by fellow-feeling for our neighbor.

THEOPHYL. But because after the cross we must have a new strength, He adds, and follow me.

CHRYS. And this He says, because it may happen that a man may suffer and yet not follow Christ, that is, when he does not suffer for Christ's sake; for he follows Christ who walks after Him, and conforms himself to His death, despising those principalities and powers under whose power before the coming of Christ, he committed sin. Then there follows For whosoever will save his life shall lose it, but whoever shall lose his life for my sake and the Gospel's, the same shall save it. I give you these commands, as it were to spare you; for whoever spares his son, brings him to destruction, but whoever does not spare him, saves him. It is therefore right to be always prepared for death; for if in the battles of this world, he who is prepared for death fights better than others, though none can restore him to life after death, much more is this the case in spiritual battle, when so great a hope of resurrection is set before him, since he who gives up his soul unto death saves it.

REMIG. And life is to he taken in this place for the present life, and not for the substance itself of the soul.

Catena Aurea Mark 8
49 posted on 09/16/2012 7:06:16 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The Confession of St. Peter

Alexey Pismenny

Oil on canvas, 40" x 30" (102 cm x 76 cm)
2009-2011

50 posted on 09/16/2012 7:06:58 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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