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Families move in to Catholic town created by former owner of Dominos Pizza
Catholic News Agency ^ | 7/16/2007

Posted on 07/16/2007 12:57:20 PM PDT by markomalley

Naples, Jul 16, 2007 / 11:10 am (CNA).- The town of Ave Maria, built around the Catholic Ave Maria University, welcomed its first residents in May, and more families are expected to move in throughout the summer and fall.

Mike and Cecilia O’Shea, along with their four daughters, Maureen, 3, Erin, 7, Caitlin, 7, and Maggie, 5, were the first of 11,000 potential households to move into the new 5,000-acre town on May 30.

The O’Sheas purchased a two-story home in Pulte Homes’ Hampton Village community. It has five bedrooms and four bathrooms, along with a spacious backyard and two living rooms. The 225 homes planned for Hampton Village range in price from the mid-$300,000s to high-$400,000s.

The 40-year-old father of four girls said the lifestyle offered in Ave Maria, close to Naples, is exactly what he and his wife were seeking for their family, reported the Naples Daily News.

They want to send their children to a Catholic school with the highest standards in academics and discipline, and “a more traditional approach, rather than the modern view many Catholic schools teach now,” Mike was quoted as saying.

Their daughters’ school will likely be taught by the sisters who live next door. The town’s oratory, or parish church, is within walking distance. La Piazza, the European-inspired Town Center, surrounds the Oratory.

The O’Sheas moved to Ave Maria from Tampa. They lived about 10 miles from the nearest parish and felt cut off from the parish community. “This will benefit us, because we’ll be closer to volunteer our time and efforts to the school and church,” Mike was quoted as saying.

Mike’s office is also within walking distance. He works for Legatus, an organization of Catholic chief executive officers, which will open an office in Ave Maria in November. Cecilia, 40, is a stay-at-home mom.

The O’Sheas enjoy living in a town with limited access to activities and lifestyles that go against a Catholic lifestyle.

“Sometimes people ask us, ‘Why do you want to shelter yourself from the real world?’ But I don’t think we’re sheltering,” Mike was quoted as saying. “Naples is as ‘real world’ as anywhere else, and it’s right down the street.

“It’s important that children are not exposed to things out there that can really harm them. When they get older and grow up, I think they’ll have the same positive experiences as any other child,” he said.

An Ave Maria Townfest, open to the public, is planned for July 21 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., for those interested in walking the plaza, viewing home models or university buildings.

The town and Ave Maria University were founded by former Domino’s Pizza owner, turned Catholic philanthropist, Tom Monaghan.


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: avemaria
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Wonder how long the ACLU will let _THAT_ last?
1 posted on 07/16/2007 12:57:21 PM PDT by markomalley
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To: markomalley

I don’t think the ACLU should do anything, but that said, I don’t think this is a good idea. I went to a very strict Southern Baptist College, and half the kids were even more wild off-campus then any other kids I met when I went to a community college. On-campus they were totally “perfect Baptists”. The other half were so innocent, they had a really hard time dealing with any kind of secular issues.
That said, if they are willing to try this, more power to them, I just don’t think it will work in practice, but it’s a good theory.


2 posted on 07/16/2007 1:20:41 PM PDT by chae (R.I.P. Eddie Guerrero He lied, he cheated, he stole my heart)
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To: markomalley

Ping to read later


3 posted on 07/16/2007 1:21:25 PM PDT by Alex Murphy (As heard on the Amish Radio Network! http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1675029/posts)
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To: markomalley

All other towns are wounded.


4 posted on 07/16/2007 1:21:59 PM PDT by dead (I've got my eye out for Mullah Omar.)
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To: markomalley

I think this is a bad idea.


5 posted on 07/16/2007 1:23:09 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: wideawake

I don’t, and I’m a nonbeliever. Self segregation (as opposed to the odious legal segregation of the Old South) builds community.


6 posted on 07/16/2007 1:25:22 PM PDT by Clemenza (Rudy Giuliani, like Pesto and Seattle, belongs in the scrap heap of '90s Culture)
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To: dead
That's funny right there. I don't care who you are, but that's funny.


7 posted on 07/16/2007 1:26:53 PM PDT by GraniteStateConservative (...He had committed no crime against America so I did not bring him here...-- Worst.President.Ever.)
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To: Clemenza
I don’t, and I’m a nonbeliever. Self segregation (as opposed to the odious legal segregation of the Old South) builds community.

Why I think it's a bad idea:

(1) How successful are the Amish in evangelizing their faith? Very few people actually volunteer to be Amish largely because their communities are so deeply insular.

(2) As our Baptist friend pointed out, deeply sheltered kids who have never been exposed to moral hazard have an alarming tendency to either succumb or freeze like a deer in the headlights, not provide an inspiring witness.

(3) Communities like this (for example, St. Mary's in KS) have a tendency to begin considering their own internal community customs as doctrinal rather than discretionary.

8 posted on 07/16/2007 1:34:50 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: markomalley

What happens if you order a pizza from a place that’s not Domino’s?


9 posted on 07/16/2007 1:35:13 PM PDT by gdani
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To: markomalley; chae

Based on observation, I would say few things like this last. But it can be wonderful while it lasts, although it usually ends with major disputes (I say this as a veteran of lay communities). Part of the problem is that there is no model for this and therefore nobody really knows how to go about it; they’re not a religious order, but what are they?

This is not the first community like this in Florida. Less than 100 miles north of Ave Maria is the town of San Antonio, founded in the 19th century as a Catholic community for families, with a monastery as its center and all the education handled by an order of sisters. The monastery, St. Leo’s (Benedictine), is still there; they are associated with St. Leo’s University, the on-line studies institution, although the monastery itself still continues to raise oranges and provide retreats. They have a lovely church that they are restoring.

THe lay community broke up before the middle of the 20th century and while the sisters stayed and continued to run a school, they got flaky after VatII and are now basically a retirement center for the few elderly sisters who managed to hang on. I believe there’s still a girl’s boarding school there, or perhaps a small college, but it’s no longer staffed by the nuns.


10 posted on 07/16/2007 1:46:27 PM PDT by livius
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To: markomalley

I’m expecting some “gay activists” to buy one of the homes and then start flinging lawsuits in the direction of every person and institution in the town that won’t recognize their perverted coupling as a “family.”


11 posted on 07/16/2007 1:50:17 PM PDT by FormerLib (Sacrificing our land and our blood cannot buy protection from jihad.-Bishop Artemije of Kosovo)
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To: gdani
What happens if you order a pizza from a place that’s not Domino’s?

After dinner confessions?

12 posted on 07/16/2007 1:55:47 PM PDT by al_c
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To: dead

Lol! Dang, that laugh caught me off guard, I think I scared our office assistant:)


13 posted on 07/16/2007 2:00:33 PM PDT by conservonator (quest)
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To: wideawake

It’s not that they’re not successful, the Amish don’t believe in evangelizing.


14 posted on 07/16/2007 2:09:36 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: markomalley

I wonder how long this ‘Catholic town’ can stay ‘pure’. Weren’t some current big cities and universities established with similar thoughts at the beginning?


15 posted on 07/16/2007 2:14:16 PM PDT by paudio
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To: markomalley

What a dream place to live — other than the hurricanses. (But the would have had that in Tampa, too)


16 posted on 07/16/2007 2:18:33 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

But they would have had that in Tampa, too.


17 posted on 07/16/2007 2:22:05 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Mr. Lucky
It’s not that they’re not successful, the Amish don’t believe in evangelizing.

Yes, but would they reject someone who wanted to become "plain"?

18 posted on 07/16/2007 2:33:31 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: wideawake

No.


19 posted on 07/16/2007 2:36:00 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: Mr. Lucky
Exactly. However, they get very few volunteers.

It's not because of their plain style of living - thousands join non-Christian cults every day and live with far fewer amenities than the Christian community of the Amish do.

It's because of the insularity of the Amish - it would take generations for a newcomer family to become truly one of them.

20 posted on 07/16/2007 2:40:06 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: wideawake
Insularity is fundamental to their faith, proselytizing is not.
21 posted on 07/16/2007 2:42:01 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: markomalley

I think it is a wonderful idea; however, the ACLU and the gay thugs will do their best to bury it in lawsuits.

The reason the secular state allows the Amish to operate is because the Amish live in austerity and do not proselytize. The Catholics, on the other hand, attract hatred like a lightning rod because Catholicism is a viable, healthy alternative to modern ills.

It is not bad for the youngsters. The conditions they will grow under, if the state allows it at all, will be conditions of normalcy, not insularity.


22 posted on 07/16/2007 2:53:22 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex

BUMP!


23 posted on 07/16/2007 2:57:01 PM PDT by Publius6961 (MSM: Israelis are killed by rockets; Lebanese are killed by Israelis.)
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To: markomalley

I wish them the best.

Are they going to open a trailer park or an apartment complex for large, Catholic families who can’t afford $400,000 houses ... or is this just going to be a rich folks’ thing?


24 posted on 07/16/2007 3:16:08 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: dead

OH, now I get it! That was funny!


25 posted on 07/16/2007 3:17:39 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: markomalley

Even if the ACLU leaves it alone, it probably won’t last beyond a few generations. Even when they’re properly brought up, a percentage of children grow up to reject the beliefs & values of their parents.


26 posted on 07/16/2007 3:42:34 PM PDT by GoLightly
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To: markomalley

This is a bit more organized and planned than usual, but I see it simply as an example and extension of what decent folks do: Create and maintain decent societies and institutions for their families and neighbors.


27 posted on 07/16/2007 4:53:39 PM PDT by D-fendr
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To: livius
they’re not a religious order, but what are they?,

I would say they are kind of like a religious order. We can call them Domino-cans. They have a repeatable system, good service, quality product and they don't change the menu too much which will be good in this day in age.

28 posted on 07/16/2007 4:58:07 PM PDT by part deux
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To: Tax-chick
Are they going to open a trailer park or an apartment complex for large, Catholic families who can’t afford $400,000 houses

In my neck of the woods, we call such people "Latinos."

29 posted on 07/16/2007 5:13:03 PM PDT by Clemenza (Rudy Giuliani, like Pesto and Seattle, belongs in the scrap heap of '90s Culture)
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To: markomalley

I very much of “wait and see” approach to this, but I think it’s a worthwile experiment. Remember, only 500 years ago town, villege, and city in western Europe was Catholic. Too bad their church is kind of strange and homely though.


30 posted on 07/16/2007 5:35:45 PM PDT by marsh_of_mists
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To: Clemenza

You’re obviously not from Oklahoma.

Or the suburbs of Charlotte, NC, where we bought a comfortable, new house for our family of ten for $160,000.


31 posted on 07/16/2007 6:03:06 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: chae

I think this sounds wonderful, and like you, I went to a Baptist Bible college so I know what you are talking about. But as an adult, to live in a community that was based on faith sounds great.


32 posted on 07/16/2007 6:08:21 PM PDT by ladyinred
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To: Tax-chick

Your obviously not from Central New Jersey, where a 2-3 bedroom townhome starts at $400K.


33 posted on 07/16/2007 6:08:37 PM PDT by Clemenza (Rudy Giuliani, like Pesto and Seattle, belongs in the scrap heap of '90s Culture)
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To: Clemenza
You're obviously not from Central New Jersey

No way on this earth, thank you very much! God made the Midwest and the Mid-South so that people with large families could live in civilized comfort.

34 posted on 07/16/2007 6:15:31 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick
I know. My sister and brother in law have a huge house where they live in Tennessee. Of course, the closest Nordstrom in 45 miles away in Nashville. ;-)

To each his or her own. Would you folks in NC or OK mind taking some of our poor folk? Even the illegals don't want to live around here due to high rent/slumlords.

35 posted on 07/16/2007 6:39:58 PM PDT by Clemenza (Rudy Giuliani, like Pesto and Seattle, belongs in the scrap heap of '90s Culture)
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To: Clemenza

We lived in south-central Tennessee for a year, when my husband was in grad school, and we had to go to Nashville to make copies! That was flippin’ primitive! And the “Mexican” food? Egad! I’d have invited the landscape-farm workers over to cook, before I’d eat at a “Mexican” restaurant!

Poor people can live pretty well in Oklahoma and North Carolina, if they work. The illegal problem is everywhere, but it’s the fault of the state/county/city government, giving the illegals handouts. You can rent an adequate (older) house here for $500 a month, or buy a trailer and rent or buy a spot for it for even less.

We’re on the edge of the Charlotte metro sprawl (such as it is, Atlantans scoff). Fifty miles east, prices look like my grandparents’ generation.


36 posted on 07/16/2007 6:45:27 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick; Clemenza

“God made the Midwest and the Mid-South so that people with large families could live in civilized comfort.”

Isn’t that the truth? LOL! Our family of 6 is happily living in a $135,000 home with room to grow.

My husband is ready to pack up and move to this town, though. It is very appealing! I looked up their site and picked out a beautiful 5 bedroom home. Now to figure out how to pay for it. Ha!


37 posted on 07/16/2007 8:28:50 PM PDT by samiam1972 (http://imrunningforpresident.blogspot.com/)
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To: dead

Not real towns.


38 posted on 07/16/2007 8:30:28 PM PDT by Grunthor (Wouldn’t it be music to our ears to hear the Iranian mullahs shouting “Incoming!”?)
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To: gdani

“What happens if you order a pizza from a place that’s not Domino’s?”

Purgatory?


39 posted on 07/16/2007 8:31:47 PM PDT by Grunthor (Wouldn’t it be music to our ears to hear the Iranian mullahs shouting “Incoming!”?)
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To: Tax-chick
Are they going to open a trailer park or an apartment complex for large, Catholic families who can’t afford $400,000 houses ... or is this just going to be a rich folks’ thing?

Naples is the most overpriced housing market in the US. Mobile home lot rents can run from about $400 for a small home to $900 for a double wide.

40 posted on 07/17/2007 8:17:16 AM PDT by Between the Lines (I am very cognizant of my fallibility, sinfulness, and other limitations.)
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To: samiam1972
Now to figure out how to pay for it. Ha!

My oldest son has suggested selling several of his brothers :-).

41 posted on 07/17/2007 8:30:10 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Between the Lines

In other words, it’s going to be a rich folks’ place.


42 posted on 07/17/2007 8:31:00 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick

Snobby Christian Community


43 posted on 07/17/2007 8:35:26 AM PDT by the_devils_advocate_666
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To: Scotswife

-let’s move!


44 posted on 07/17/2007 8:35:38 AM PDT by tioga (I'll take Duncan Hunter or Fred Thompson for President. Pick one.)
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To: tioga

burmese pythons.
Alligators.


45 posted on 07/17/2007 10:01:09 AM PDT by Scotswife
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To: Scotswife

I don’t know which is scarier, that or NY state taxes.


46 posted on 07/17/2007 11:44:15 AM PDT by tioga (I'll take Duncan Hunter or Fred Thompson for President. Pick one.)
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To: the_devils_advocate_666

“Snob” implies an intention that I’m in no place to judge. However, it appears that people can’t afford to live there unless they’re very well off.


47 posted on 07/17/2007 11:45:18 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: dead
All other towns are wounded.

LOL. Bet they have some wicked bingo games in that town.

48 posted on 07/17/2007 11:47:32 AM PDT by AxelPaulsenJr (Fred Thompson for President)
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To: tioga

LOL!

Yes...both give you a suffucating sensation in the neck.


49 posted on 07/17/2007 1:01:32 PM PDT by Scotswife
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To: chae

I think the difference between the Baptists and the Catholics is that we Catholics are allowed to dance, and drink at the legal age while Baptists are not.


50 posted on 07/17/2007 1:08:45 PM PDT by Suzy Quzy (Hillary in '08.....Her PHONINESS is GENUINE !!!!)
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