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New Photos Show Lake Powell Half Full
livescience.com ^ | May 23, 2014 09:37am ET | Stephanie Pappas

Posted on 05/25/2014 9:58:25 AM PDT by ckilmer

The mud-choked Colorado River flows through the dry lakebed of northern Lake Powell in a new satellite image released yesterday (May 22).

Western drought has left this reservoir on the border of Utah and Arizona less than half full, the satellite image captured on May 13 reveals. As of May 21, the lake was at 42 percent of capacity, according to U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) data.

(Excerpt) Read more at livescience.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Mexico; News/Current Events; US: Arizona; US: California; US: Utah
KEYWORDS: coloradoriver; g42; lakepowell; powell

1 posted on 05/25/2014 9:58:25 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

I think they meant half full.


2 posted on 05/25/2014 9:59:34 AM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Obama's smidgens are coming home to roost.)
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To: ckilmer

Didn’t we okay sending a ton of water to Mexico recently?

That Obama... such a smart guy


3 posted on 05/25/2014 10:00:08 AM PDT by Bogey78O (We had a good run. Coulda been great still.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

Whoops! I think they meant half empty.


4 posted on 05/25/2014 10:00:19 AM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Obama's smidgens are coming home to roost.)
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To: ckilmer
lake powell at half capacity The muddy Colorado River moves through the dry bed of northern Lake Powell on May 13, 2014
5 posted on 05/25/2014 10:00:39 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: FlingWingFlyer

or half empty...


6 posted on 05/25/2014 10:02:00 AM PDT by DanielRedfoot (Creepy Ass Cracker)
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To: ckilmer

I just read the other day that they are celebrating that the Colorado river reached the Sea of Cortez for the first time since the 70’s.


7 posted on 05/25/2014 10:03:13 AM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin
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To: ckilmer

http://lakepowell.water-data.com/


8 posted on 05/25/2014 10:04:48 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

Sounds like 58% empty.

They’re as close to 2/3 empty as 1/2 empty, for all intents and purposes.

wow


9 posted on 05/25/2014 10:07:20 AM PDT by F15Eagle (1Jn4:15;5:4-5,11-13;Mt27:50-54;Mk15:33-34;Jn3:17-18,6:69,11:25,14:6,20:31;Ro10:8-11;1Tm2:5-6;Ti3:4-7)
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To: ckilmer

The last time I visited Lake Powell in 1984 it was in danger of overflowing the top of the dam at Page, AZ


10 posted on 05/25/2014 10:13:24 AM PDT by anoldafvet (If you think the government is capable of taking care of you, just look at the VA.)
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To: ckilmer

I lived and worked at Hite Marina on the north end of the lake.

The marina is no longer there.

How long before they can no longer make electricity with the dam ?


11 posted on 05/25/2014 10:13:46 AM PDT by maine yankee (I got my Governor at 'Marden's')
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To: ckilmer

The same amount of water as 100 years ago, supplying millions more people.

Seems to me it’s not a matter of supply, but one of demand.


12 posted on 05/25/2014 10:21:00 AM PDT by airborne (My heroes don't wear capes - My heroes wear dog tags!)
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To: ckilmer

Sounds to me like they are letting too much water go downstream from the dam.


13 posted on 05/25/2014 10:22:57 AM PDT by babygene ( .)
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To: ckilmer

Glo-bull warmchangdisruption, dontchaknow.


14 posted on 05/25/2014 10:24:51 AM PDT by Thorliveshere (Minnesota Survivor)
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To: maine yankee

Recent studies indicate the lake levels might drop below the minimum of 1050ft elev to fill hydroelectric generation inlets as early as 2017, depending upon worldwide weather models.

Now that HAARP is being abandoned by the USAF and being transferred to possibly Canada, and a number of other progressive leaning countries/Agenda 21, who knows?


15 posted on 05/25/2014 10:24:52 AM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: babygene

If they held more water in Lake Powell, Lake Mead would be even lower than it is.


16 posted on 05/25/2014 10:46:09 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: ckilmer

SO that’s what I look like from space.


17 posted on 05/25/2014 10:47:25 AM PDT by MaxMax (Pay Attention and you'll be pissed off too! FIRE BOEHNER, NOW!)
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To: ckilmer

The watersheds of the upper Colorado river are not in a drought- they had close to 100 percent of snowpack, and it’s still snowing. Don’t know why they’ve let so much water out, but it’s not because of a drought.


18 posted on 05/25/2014 11:03:38 AM PDT by Red Boots
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To: Red Boots

I remember when Al Gore had ordered water released so he could have a nice backdrop of water rushing by in a campaign commercial. I suspect that the water is purposely being diverted just like water to California’s Central Valley is purposely being blocked.


19 posted on 05/25/2014 11:08:59 AM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: airborne

There is your answer.


20 posted on 05/25/2014 11:10:57 AM PDT by mylife (The roar of the masses could be farts)
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To: ckilmer

In addition to hydroelectric power, and recreation, Lake Powell was created to accommodate storage for runoff to mitigate flooding and erosion, and otherwise store “excess” water for irrigation and dry periods...

As of May 25, 2014, according to Colorado SNOTEL Snowpack Update Report, based on Mountain Data from NRCS SNOTEL Sites, the Colorado River Basin snowpack is running at about 185% of median...And still getting heavy snows...

Colorado CDOT has had to blast snow to open passes this year snows have been so heavy...Wet and dry cycles for the Rockies are nothing new...

Lake Powell could be refilled this summer once runoff begins in earnest...

The lake has been at this point or lower several times in it’s history...Looks bad now, but it will be back...


21 posted on 05/25/2014 11:25:44 AM PDT by elteemike (Light travels faster than sound...That's why so many people appear bright until you hear them speak!)
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To: Red Boots
From the BLM's description of Lake Powell water management:

The Upper Colorado River Basin regularly experiences significant year to year hydrologic variability. During the 14-year period 2000 to 2013, however, the unregulated inflow to Lake Powell, which is a good measure of hydrologic conditions in the Colorado River Basin, was above average in only 3 out of the past 14 years. The period 2000-2013 is the lowest 14-year period since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, with an average unregulated inflow of 8.25 maf, or 76% of the 30-year average (1981-2010). (For comparison, the 1981-2010 total water year average is 10.83 maf.) The unregulated inflow during the 2000-2013 period has ranged from a low of 2.64 maf (24% of average) in water year 2002 to a high of 15.97 maf (147% of average) in water year 2011. Under the current forecast, total water year 2014 unregulated inflows to Lake Powell are expected to range between a minimum probable of 9.6 maf (88% of average) and a maximum probable of 12.7 maf (118% of average) with a most probable projection of 10.83 maf (100% of average).

They've got quite a few lean years to catch-up from; it may be decades before the lake refills completely, if ever.

22 posted on 05/25/2014 11:28:00 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: elteemike; DuncanWaring

according to DuncanWaring’s link http://lakepowell.water-data.com

Lake Powell is down from last year to nearly historic lows but its now refilling fast.

From what I’ve read, the lakes are down so low that it would take a couple years of more than 100% snowpack —as it is this year—in the rockies to refill the dams.

That said, its nice to hear there’s such a big snow pack this year.


23 posted on 05/25/2014 11:35:41 AM PDT by ckilmer
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To: Red Boots
Don’t know why they’ve let so much water out, but it’s not because of a drought.

The volume of Colorado River water that is available for irrigation in Arizona, Nevada, California and Mexico is established by the river's flow at the Utah-Arizona state line.

When the volumes were originally set, the river's flow was much greater than it is now -- it was a relatively wet period...and the evaporation and absorption attributable to Lake Powell is enormous.

Accordingly, more water has been allocated than is actually available...

24 posted on 05/25/2014 11:36:31 AM PDT by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: Ignorance on parade.)
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To: ckilmer

If you go to that link, and hit “Graphs” immediately below the image at the top of the page, then select “Lake Powell” from the pull-down menu, you can see a graph of the lake level for the last five years.

2011 was very good, the other three of the four previous years were bad.

Lake Mead’s also available there; it’s not doing any better.


25 posted on 05/25/2014 11:45:51 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Red Boots

Create a chrisis.


26 posted on 05/25/2014 2:35:35 PM PDT by Bogey78O (We had a good run. Coulda been great still.)
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To: elteemike; ckilmer
>

with Heavy snow pack .


27 posted on 05/25/2014 3:45:55 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Looks like the take away of the graph is that most of colorado’s snow pack goes to the colorado river.


28 posted on 05/25/2014 5:09:04 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: elteemike; george76; DuncanWaring; okie01
thanks DuncanWaring. This gives a clearer picture of the annual and cumulative rise and fall for the last 5 years. This years may not have as steep a rise as 2011 but it looks like it may cross 2013 levels and maybe touch 2012 if the snowpack in colorado is deep enough.


29 posted on 05/25/2014 5:18:43 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer

The Colorado state wide snowpack is 153.45% of the May 25th average.

http://snowpack.water-data.com/uppercolorado/index.php

The Colorado and Yampa Rivers are at 168 to 166 percent above average.

ftp://ftp-fc.sc.egov.usda.gov/CO/Snow/snow/watershed/daily/co_update_snow.pdf


30 posted on 05/25/2014 5:27:29 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: ckilmer

I tried posting that picture but couldn’t get it to work.

There is also a single chart that ostensibly shows a continuous graph of the water level since the dam was completed, but that one doesn’t seem to be working today (at least for me).


31 posted on 05/25/2014 5:36:00 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring

Which one ?


32 posted on 05/25/2014 5:38:45 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: ckilmer

In April 2005 it got down to 3555’ before the spring runoff started; the last time it had been that low was during the early months of the Nixon administration, when it was initially filling.


33 posted on 05/25/2014 5:41:00 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: george76

Graphs -> Lake Powell, then select “All Time Lake Levels” from the pull-down menu at the bottom of the page.

When its working, it gives a single-line trace of the lake level since 1963; right now it gives (me) the graph posted earlier.

Though, you can get a tabular approximation by clicking on one of the “dates” in the table on the main page; that will give you the level on that date for every year since 1963. From there, you can maneuver around to different days.


34 posted on 05/25/2014 5:45:13 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: ckilmer

The current forecast is to peak at 3616’, but that forecast was made prior to the Mother’s Day storm.


35 posted on 05/25/2014 5:49:49 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring

Thanks


36 posted on 05/25/2014 6:11:05 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: ckilmer

Umm...I’m just sharing this as the numbers don’t ring true to me

http://www.oneonta.edu/faculty/baumanpr/geosat2/Lake_Powell/Colorado_River_Basin_Lake_Powell.htm

The linked article above is from 2001 and states at that time Glenn Canyon dam might not be able to generate power due to low lake level by 2007 and that in 2001 the lake was at 54% capacity.

Something hinky...the net result here is that folks in the SW gained another decade vs. the 2007 predictions of the Oneonta paper. Oooooo...CRISIS! /s

I think it was another FReeper that commented the Bundy fight was likely about water rights; I think that might be found to be factual.


37 posted on 05/25/2014 6:14:55 PM PDT by logi_cal869
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To: logi_cal869

With the possible exception of the Pacific Northwest, most everything that happens west of longitude W100 is about water rights one way or another.


38 posted on 05/25/2014 6:32:00 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Cvengr
Recent studies indicate the lake levels might drop below the minimum of 1050ft elev to fill hydroelectric generation inlets as early as 2017, depending upon worldwide weather models.

Then there probably is a model that says something else. El Nino will fix them right up.

39 posted on 05/25/2014 6:43:42 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Do The Math)
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To: DuncanWaring

I tried posting that picture but couldn’t get it to work.
.................
This tool makes it easy to copy and past pictures or whole articles with pictures nicely laid out.

http://4html.net/Online-text-to-HTML-converter-831.html


40 posted on 05/25/2014 6:48:01 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: Mike Darancette

The Max Water Elevation of Glen Canyon Dam is recorded as 3711ft. The article posts the present water level at 1080ft, which is about 30 ft above the min operating inlet elevation of 1050ft.

In 2010 it’s lowest level was reached at 1081.85ft. End of last year it was recorded at 1103 in Nov13, having dropped about 20 ft since the previous Feb13.

With the present draught, the recharge might not happen for another year or so. If the article quoting the present level as 1080ft, even with precipitation in the watershed measuring like last year’s, it could drop to 1060ft.

in 1983, one of the higher years, it was 1206-1225ft.


41 posted on 05/25/2014 7:02:14 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: ckilmer

the drought has occurred WITHOUT any rise in annual average global temperatures in the last 17+ years, clearly indicative of bigger forces than CO2 at work, affecting trade winds and jet stream cycles in the atmosphere, dynamically & constantly affecting, and changing, the flow or moisture laden clouds


42 posted on 05/25/2014 7:05:08 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: george76

Nice hydrology summary.


43 posted on 05/25/2014 7:05:25 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Cvengr

My bust,..I posted Lake Mead datum vice Lake Powell.


44 posted on 05/25/2014 7:09:18 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Mike Darancette

That’s why those who critiqued the report believed the worldwide weather models weren’t accurate enough to reliably forecast continuing drought.


45 posted on 05/25/2014 7:11:42 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: logi_cal869

http://www.usbr.gov/main/water/

Some decent historical datum here.


46 posted on 05/25/2014 7:12:59 PM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Cvengr

Lake Powell was at its present level in the late 1960s, when it was initially filling; from there it took another decade to completely fill.

That means from here it would take a decade of “normal” precipitation to refill.

But that would leave Lake Mead still half-full.

Refilling Lake Mead would take another decade (though in practice, both would be gradually filled simultaneously).

That’s assuming the precipitation patterns of the last half-century return, which is by no means a sure thing.

But, about 20 years ago in Arizona I saw a single winter storm erase the accumulated water deficit of a two-year drought. Another overall winter like 1982-1983 would help a lot.


47 posted on 05/26/2014 3:34:38 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring

That was one hellacious year for rainfall!


48 posted on 05/27/2014 9:49:57 AM PDT by HiJinx (Bunkerville - where the government made the Government. back down.)
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To: HiJinx

You talking about ‘82/’83? I missed that one.

Was that the year with the two 500-year storms a week apart, that flooded Sky Harbor?

I didn’t get there ‘til ‘84.


49 posted on 05/27/2014 5:42:06 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring

Right year. I wasn’t here, yet, either. I heard all about it when I returned Stateside in ‘88.


50 posted on 05/27/2014 10:19:03 PM PDT by HiJinx (Bunkerville - where the government made the Government. back down.)
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