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Voyager: Through the door to eternity
BBC ^

Posted on 09/15/2013 9:51:05 AM PDT by chessplayer

Dr Carolyn Porco is one of the world's leading planetary scientists and was part of the Voyager-1 imaging team. She helped Carl Sagan set up Voyager's famous "Pale Blue Dot" portrait of Earth when the probe had reached beyond Neptune in 1990. Here, she reflects on what it means to see the veteran craft finally make the leap to interstellar space.

It is a momentous occasion. We know now with certainty that the Voyager spacecraft, launched 36 years ago to spend the 1980s touring the outer solar system, has finally slipped beyond the protective magnetic bubble created by our Sun and into the nothingness of interstellar space.

Such an event happens for the first time in human history only once. And as reported in a publication today in the journal Science, it happened last summer.

Voyager was a mission of mythic proportions, with all the elements of Homeric legend, and I was unspeakably fortunate to have been a part of it.

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: alreadyposted; voyager1
I'm still letting this soak in. Absolutely incredible. I think this is actually even more momentous than the Apollo moon landings. And this would never have been possible if the space program was not govt funded. Why? Because this mission was about pure knowledge. No profit motive. Nobody made money (beyond their base salaries) off this mission. It was done for knowledge's sake and nothing else.
1 posted on 09/15/2013 9:51:05 AM PDT by chessplayer
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To: chessplayer

It will be back to make a terrible movie.


2 posted on 09/15/2013 9:52:51 AM PDT by SHOOT THE MOON bat
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To: chessplayer

Contractors.corporations built for profit the hardware and facilities.

And this was done before PC and “muslime outreach.”


3 posted on 09/15/2013 9:54:25 AM PDT by Hulka
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To: chessplayer

From back when NASA was run by the Germans...

:^)


4 posted on 09/15/2013 9:56:35 AM PDT by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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To: chessplayer

Veger will come back in a few hundred years and threaten the earth. :)


5 posted on 09/15/2013 9:57:57 AM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
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To: SHOOT THE MOON bat

6 posted on 09/15/2013 9:58:48 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: chessplayer

V’ger;)


7 posted on 09/15/2013 9:59:48 AM PDT by mdittmar
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To: chessplayer
To be that far out is an acomplishment to be sure but its got a very long way to go before it actually leaves the solar system.

To technically leave the solar system it will need to be outside the sun's influence beyond the most distance orbiting objects. It shouldn't take but another 26,000 years or so. Its still inside the closest orbit of Sedna.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
8 posted on 09/15/2013 10:09:24 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: chessplayer

The future belongs to unmanned spacecraft.

They have gone and will go where no man can. In fact man may never be able to match these accomplishments...It would take man probably thousands of years, or possibly never just to match the data these unmanned spacecraft have already achieved.

Unmanned spacecraft have obtained so much data in the past 30 plus years, we’ll be studying that data for another several decades. It will be the unmanned spacecraft which will pave the way for the few doable manned missions. In fact unmanned spacecraft/rovers are doing that right now in regards to Mars.

It’s why the Shuttle program was trashed.

I believe the shuttle program competed about 30,000++ earth orbits...It basically was reduced to supplying the ISS. It was time to move on.


9 posted on 09/15/2013 10:12:59 AM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: chessplayer
I'm still letting this soak in. Absolutely incredible. I think this is actually even more momentous than the Apollo moon landings. And this would never have been possible if the space program was not govt funded. Why? Because this mission was about pure knowledge. No profit motive. Nobody made money (beyond their base salaries) off this mission. It was done for knowledge's sake and nothing else.

As much as it goes against most libertarian thought, I do see a need and understand there are times government needs to fund various things to advance medicine and science. I'm not for funding things that are considered BS but are for things that do return a genuine benefit. I'm also for private funding as well if they wish to do so.
10 posted on 09/15/2013 10:17:35 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (It is about time we re-enact Normandy, at the shores of the Potomac.)
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To: Nowhere Man

NASA should have a pathfinding and prospecting mission like Lewis and Clark.


11 posted on 09/15/2013 10:28:30 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: mdittmar; chessplayer
Whoops! Veger V'ger will come back in a few hundred years and threaten the earth. :)
12 posted on 09/15/2013 10:29:19 AM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
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To: chessplayer
Actually there was a great deal of for private sector involvement. Honeywell in MA provided the star trackers. GE in NY provided Computer Command Subsystems and Flight Control Processors - Ted Kennedy along with Jacob Javits of NY, Birch Bayh of IN and William Proxmire of WI were the program's harshest critics. They had to be paid off somehow. There were aerospace contractors all over the country providing components - and politicians in their states and districts contributing their votes.

When the government is involved there ain't no such thing as "pure knowledge".

13 posted on 09/15/2013 10:49:30 AM PDT by InABunkerUnderSF (Because 2 terms with Jerry Brown as Governor was all I could take.)
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To: Nowhere Man
Technological superiority was a deterrent during the cold war. Our space program was a propaganda weapon. That's one reason why people who were opposed to American victory in the Cold War were also against the space program.

Too bad we don't have leaders who love our country and what it stands for.

14 posted on 09/15/2013 10:58:05 AM PDT by InABunkerUnderSF (Because 2 terms with Jerry Brown as Governor was all I could take.)
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To: Hulka

You might say that the government subsidized the R&D of the contractors during this period. As many people have noted, the secondary benefits to emerging technologies that followed was tremendous.

One of the few instances where public “investment” paid real dividends ...


15 posted on 09/15/2013 10:59:33 AM PDT by mikrofon (NOT $$$ for Al-NASAm)
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To: dragnet2

>>>The future belongs to unmanned spacecraft.

They have gone and will go where no man can. In fact man may never be able to match these accomplishments...It would take man probably thousands of years, or possibly never just to match the data these unmanned spacecraft have already achieved.<<<

Yes and no. That’s like saying the future belongs to the internal combustion engine and intricate geared mechanisms, except I’m still inside the car moving down the road while all that technology moves me along.

The technology in the unmanned spacecraft - and robots and rovers and gatherers of comet dust - can also be used to carry us along for the ride. It will be like my right front brake caliper in my truck. The robots can go outside into the harshness of the interstellar environment; the data can be assessed and reviewed by artificial intelligence; and we can go along for the ride. It isn’t one or the other.


16 posted on 09/15/2013 11:01:55 AM PDT by redpoll
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To: James C. Bennett

“Once the rockets are up, who cares where they come down?
That’s not my department,” says Wernher von Braun.


17 posted on 09/15/2013 11:55:46 AM PDT by stormer
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To: chessplayer

Voyager was launch when NASA was an elite organization run by first class scientists....not the global warming moron of present!!!


18 posted on 09/15/2013 12:30:22 PM PDT by ontap (***)
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To: Marine_Uncle
I would worry about Veger too:


19 posted on 09/15/2013 12:45:56 PM PDT by Petrosius
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To: Petrosius

Holy smokes. We really got a problem now. :)


20 posted on 09/15/2013 12:54:05 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
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http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/voyager1/index


21 posted on 09/15/2013 1:09:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: redpoll
I noted ya cherry picked my comment...

Here is the entire comment:

__________________________________________________________

The future belongs to unmanned spacecraft.

They have gone and will go where no man can. In fact man may never be able to match these accomplishments...It would take man probably thousands of years, or possibly never just to match the data these unmanned spacecraft have already achieved.

Ya see unmanned spacecraft will go and have gone on suicide missions for the sake of exploration and data. There are some places where you will not be going along for the ride...Ever.

It's what makes unmanned spacecraft so valuable.

It's why I said, they have gone and will go where no man can.

22 posted on 09/15/2013 1:24:02 PM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: mikrofon

Of course you are right, the government “subsidized” R&D, as the contractors never built anything like that before and would not have done so unless the government reimbursed them for that expense. . .non-recurring R&D is a specific budgeting line item for government programs.

Point is, contractors responded to an RFI/RFP and bid on the contract and the one’s that won did so because they were the lowest bidder (and in some cases “best value”).

The contractors built the kit for profit. Sounds harsh, but true as corporations/contractors are in the game to make money, to stay in business, to get repeat business, etc.

The government, by law, is prohibited from making a profit.

So, the government had a program they wanted and they contracted private industry to build the products necessary to execute the program.


23 posted on 09/15/2013 5:27:43 PM PDT by Hulka
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To: chessplayer
And this would never have been possible if the space program was not govt funded. Why? Because this mission was about pure knowledge. No profit motive.

Yep. Those were different times. I was there. Nowadays, NASA is nothing more than a propaganda arm of the "global warming" scam to steal untold trillions of dollars, without end, from taxpaying, traditional American families. It's time for private business to step up and take the next steps. Get the stinking government out of the space business, except for military programs, and let visionary billionaires take over the exploration of space. Government turns whatever it touches to turd.

24 posted on 09/15/2013 5:36:28 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard

Yep. Those were different times. I was there. Nowadays, NASA is nothing more than a propaganda arm of the “global warming” scam to steal untold trillions of dollars, without end, from taxpaying, traditional American families. It’s time for private business to step up and take the next steps. Get the stinking government out of the space business, except for military programs, and let visionary billionaires take over the exploration of space. Government turns whatever it touches to turd.


As I said, this mission would NEVER have happened if private business ran the space program.


25 posted on 09/16/2013 6:41:04 AM PDT by chessplayer
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To: cripplecreek

To be that far out is an acomplishment to be sure but its got a very long way to go before it actually leaves the solar system.

To technically leave the solar system it will need to be outside the sun’s influence beyond the most distance orbiting objects. It shouldn’t take but another 26,000 years or so. Its still inside the closest orbit of Sedna.


They believe Sedna may be a member of the Oort Cloud, and the Oort cloud extends over two light years from the sun. If two light years from the sun isn’t interstellar space, then there is no such thing as interstellar space. I doubt you will find many who believe two light years from the sun isn’t interstellar space, and that our Solar System extends over two light years.


26 posted on 09/16/2013 6:51:48 AM PDT by chessplayer
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To: chessplayer

Two light years? Really, I’ve never read that 50k to 100k AUs is what I have read, with most folk favoring the 50k AU figure. 50k AU = 1/2 light year.


27 posted on 09/16/2013 7:03:17 AM PDT by jpsb (Believe nothing until it has been officially denied)
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To: chessplayer

Its a subjective call kinda like the Pluto decision. I personally consider anything to be under the gravitational influence of our sun to be in the solar system.

Voyager is outside the heliosheath of Sol but that’s only one of at least 3 different camps of scientific thought. Another is the group that considers the solar system to include the kuiper belt objects. I consider myself in the 3rd camp that puts the solar system at Ort cloud or long period comet size.

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=374


28 posted on 09/16/2013 7:35:00 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: chessplayer
As I said, this mission would NEVER have happened if private business ran the space program.

Agreed. Those were the good old days.

29 posted on 09/16/2013 10:48:18 AM PDT by Lancey Howard
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