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Meeting Ahmadinejad
Eurasia: Informational and Analytic Portal ^ | July 4, 2013 | Aleksandr Dugin

Posted on 07/12/2013 7:25:02 PM PDT by annalex

Meeting Ahmadinejad

(Original title: Dugin on Ahmadinejad)

On July 2, 2013 in the "President Hotel" in Moscow, a discrete meeting between Russian politicians, public figures and experts with the President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad took place. He had one month remaining in office. Looking at him, it was difficult to believe. Before us was an absolutely confident in his country and in his cause political and spiritual leader.

After an inspirational speech of the President of the Club Izborsk Alexander Prokhanov that marked the importance of Iran's accession to the Eurasian Union, I made some remarks about the Russian-Iranian cooperation.

My speech, almost verbatim.

Between Russia and Iran a strategic partnership is evolving and should evolve in the future along the following five areas.

1. Geopolitical direction. If we look at the structure of the strategic interests of Russia and Iran over the entire periphery of our common borders, then immediately see the following picture: the Russian-Iranian interests almost always and everywhere coincide. In Afghanistan, Central Asia, the Caspian region, the South Caucasus - we have strictly the same priorities: to prevent the growth of influence of NATO (USA and Western Europe), constrain the possible expansion of the asymmetrically powerful China, counter the Salafi and Wahhabi forms of radical Sunnism, which is oriented toward Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and certain circles in Pakistan. Both Russia and Iran support Armenia, but Russia and Iran are interested in rapprochement with Azerbaijan. Both Russia and Iran would benefit from weakening the American puppet Saakashvili of Georgia and an arrival of a more rational and balanced politician there. Both Russia and Iran would find handy a reorientation of Turkey in more of a Eurasian geopolitical key. And even in the Middle East, where Russia acts indirectly, and Iran, in contrast, has a vital interest, today we are fully in agreement on the issue of Syria, and that means that we share the a critical position towards Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Israel. At the same time, in alliance with Iran, Russia will be able to realize the old geopolitical dream: access to warm seas. Today there is a chance for a historic breakthrough in our rapprochement.

2. In the field of international relations. Russia and Iran are in favor of a multipolar world order. Putin and Ahmadinejad strongly criticize the unipolarity of the West and deny it the right to decide for all of humanity. Both countries see the future only as a part of a multi-polar world. Hence, the two countries have a vital interest in establishing a multipolar world against American hegemony. We have developed a "Theory of a multi-polar world", which is equally important for Russia and Iran.

3. The ideological direction. Iran's political structure does not correspond to any of the classic political ideologies of the West in modern times. This is not liberalism, not communism, not nationalism. Therefore, the political philosophy of modern Iran lies beyond these three ideologies, in the area of the "fourth ideology." In this sense, it is important that my book "The Fourth Political Theory" has been translated into Farsi and published recently in Tehran. Modern Russia is in a similar situation: communism has been discredited, liberalism was rejected, nationalism will lead to the disintegration of multi-ethnic society in Russia. For Russia's political future also lies in the "Fourth of political theory." It brings us together and forces us to work more closely.

4. The economic sphere. Iran and Russia share an interest in undermining U.S. hegemony in the economy, the end of the dollar imperialism and in ending the dictatorship of global finance. Joining forces in the field of energy will transform our countries into an energy holding company of global significance. In addition, Iran and Russia are interested in getting out of the dollar zone and in the creation of the Eurasian currency. Russia must help Iran to break the suffocating economic blockade. In the economics our interests are absolutely identical.

5. Spiritually. During my stay in the holy Shi'ite city of Qom in conversation with Ayatollah Hamedani I noticed the term that he used - "culture of expectations”, farhangi intizor. The idea was that the spiritual sense of the religious Iran consists in waiting for the Mahdi, the final Savior of the world, who will put an end to oppression, capitalism, the rule of the West and, and the worldwide injustice. Ayatollah Hamedani also talked about how it brings the Shiites closer to the Orthodox, who are also awaiting the moment of the Second Coming, and that according to the hadith of the Prophet, in the final battle, Muslims and Christians are on the same side of the barricades against the hordes Daddzhala-Antichrist (Atlanticism, United States, globalization) . And that everything will be decided in Damascus, where in the Umayyad Mosque the eschatological mystery is destined to happen. This "culture of expectation" unites our peoples and our societies who see the purpose of life not in material comfort, but in the realization of the great goal - the triumph of truth, goodness and justice. Our struggle is for a better future, against the worst-case, in which we find ourselves today.

Ahmadinejad radiated will and confidence in his own victory. It was quite clear that his goal is not power, much less comfort, but a martyr’s testimony of the truth.

President Ahmadinejad has closely followed all the above, and it was evident that his assessment of this discourse was positive. In his response, however, he has placed the following accents. I convey meaning, not direct speech.

1. The first four levels – is a matter of practice and all the processes are developed to the fullest and at the proper level in that regard. It's all right, and so it will continue to go as we are bound to it by history and geography. The coincidence of our interests is an objective fact.

2. The most important thing is the "culture of expectation." That is the direction in which we are to work and where has not been done enough. This spiritual rapprochement between Russia and Iran has now become crucial. "Culture of expectation" should be the formula that will unite all the supporters of the Truth and the opponents of American-Zionist evil and liberal-capitalist plague into a general planetary front.

3.Then the unexpected happened. Ahmadinejad cited the case of the conversation with the "president of a Latin American country, an Indian, not a Catholic, not a Muslim" (not hard to guess who that was) who, after hearing Ahmadinejad's speech to the UN about the "culture of expectation" (!) came to him and said, "This culture is not only the property of the monotheistic religions. We, the Incas, waiting for the One who will come back. The Man who comes." And even Buddhist leaders whom Ahmadinejad met, assured him that the Buddhist world is also a part of the "culture of expectation".

4. "Culture of expectation" is therefore a universal model, based on which we are to build the future world order. In order to replace the world of evil, imperialist hegemony of the U.S. and global financial oligarchy it is necessary to build a better world

5. Objective: To establish an alternative "world government" based on a "culture of expectation" and wrest power from the American hegemony and the world finance.

6. Responding to the comments of another speaker, Ahmadinejad has developed his idea of what a "true man" is. He meant a "Man of the time," that is the "hidden Imam". It is precisely He who stands in the center of the "culture of expectations", as it is the expectation of the True Man, that is his own self. People should not rely on their private opinions - this is chaos and confusion. We must listen to the will of the One who will come. And power will belong to Him and Him alone.

After such a dizzying revelations of the President of a great country and a representative of the great and ancient culture, it became clear the following. As he is departing from the presidency, this man is not going anywhere - not away from politics, nor away from history. In Iran is not only a place makes a person - a person means something. Not by himself, but if on the same wavelength with the True Man, acting in concert with him, and by His internal sanctions.

And this is truly fundamental.

So that no one may shriek [*].

Aleksandr Dugin


[*] This sounds as bizarre in the original as it is in English [A-x].


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS:
Dugin (Wiki) is probably not a familiar name for the Gentle Freeper, but he is a notable thinker and ideologue in Russia, where he preaches the so-called Eurasianism. That is an ideology whereby Russia is not a part of the West, culturally or spiritually, should seek an identity in closer ties with Asia, and must oppose the West and especially the United States.

I think that this article gives valuable and rarely seen in English insights into the personality of Ahmadinejad, Chaves, the Russian ruling elite, and generally the ideological forces aligned against us.

1 posted on 07/12/2013 7:25:02 PM PDT by annalex
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To: A.A. Cunningham; andyk; BatGuano; Belteshazzar; bert; Bigg Red; blueunicorn6; boxlunch; ...

A little scoop for you from the vast steppes of the Russian Internet.

If you want to be on this right wing, monarchy, paleolibertarianism and nationalism ping list, but are not, please let me know. If you are on it and want to be off, also let me know.


2 posted on 07/12/2013 7:26:30 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

I would publicly declare that I would like to be on your list.


3 posted on 07/12/2013 7:32:19 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: annalex

Iran is against Caliphate and China. Both are more serious threats for US in a long run than any ‘countering US hegemony’ by Iran which is more about regional rivalry, not about hull-scale hostility. It means that Iran’s policy is more coincident with long term US interests than of Obama regime’s. Has Iran ever killed Americans in a couple decades? Last time I ‘ve check it was mostly ‘friends’ Saudis and their Sunni butt-buddies ‘freedom-fighters’ who killed.
Not to mention Iran has a fat chance to transform into a really friendly nation, unlike Arab cut-throats.


4 posted on 07/12/2013 7:44:55 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: annalex

There is one BIG problem with all of this. ISLAM is BAD for EVERYBODY. The Russians have been fighting these vermin a lot longer than most nations. Too bad we don’t have a real leader who could unite the world to rid itself of this cursed cult once and for all!


5 posted on 07/12/2013 7:46:33 PM PDT by Nateman (If liberals are not screaming you are doing it wrong!)
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To: annalex

Please ping me.


6 posted on 07/12/2013 7:49:12 PM PDT by tanuki (Left-wing Revolution: show biz for boring people.)
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To: AdmSmith

How popular is Dugin in Russia?


7 posted on 07/12/2013 10:03:09 PM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: yarddog

You are. Thank you.


8 posted on 07/13/2013 10:16:13 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: cunning_fish

I, too, don’t see Iran as a big threat; Iran is a serious regional power and a strong national idea built on becoming one pole in a multipolar world. That is not something we cannot live with, even more so since they have a republican form of government rather than dictatorial one.

I also think that Ahmadinejad is a bit touched in the head and can be very irritating because of that.


9 posted on 07/13/2013 10:22:14 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: Nateman
The Russians have been fighting these vermin a lot longer than most nations

And they are giving up. That is real news here: not Ahmadinejad's "culture of expectation" but that prominent Orthodox figures close to the ruling apparatus in Russia would contemplate how "in the final battle, Muslims and Christians are on the same side of the barricades".

10 posted on 07/13/2013 10:26:52 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: tanuki

Sure. Thank you.


11 posted on 07/13/2013 10:27:36 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: nuconvert
How popular is Dugin in Russia?

I don't know. He is not among those who contend for power and end up in jail for it. He is more of a thinker. We was connected to Limonov, -- a colorful man, a great poet and a founder of National Bolshevik movement. That earned Limonov some following and even a jail term for armed insurrection, no less. Both are basically proponents of the restoration of the USSR, albeit in some new form, and hate the Western political and economic system.

Dugin is however, a believer (Orthodox but with a twist) and that separated him from Limonov who has no discernible religion.

But these are personalities. The Eurasianism, however, seems to be a conscious Putin's policy: there is a clear course on irritating the US, and rapprochement with everything in Asia that would sit down with them: Iran, China, Assad, domestic Muslims. Russia has its own immigration crisis: residents of the Muslim periphery flood ethnically Russian territory in search of work, mosques are being built at a dizzying pace (alongside Orthodox churches) and Russian cities take on a bit of that Central Asia look. That troubles the general population, which, however, remains mostly docile; it also greatly troubles the few Russian conservatives and nationalists -- who tend to see Russia as a decidedly European power that colonized Caucasus and Central Asia. They do not have a voice other than in the blogosphere. It is hard to say if they influence anyone. Greater influencer seems to be ethnic crime: rape and bar brawls, where Russians, not used to street fighting and not used to carrying knives and guns, come out victims. This causes anger and may result in pogroms against the Asians. All that is sad to watch, and Dugin has got to like it.

12 posted on 07/13/2013 10:46:39 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

>>>>I, too, don’t see Iran as a big threat; Iran is a serious regional power and a strong national idea built on becoming one pole in a multipolar world. That is not something we cannot live with, even more so since they have a republican form of government rather than dictatorial one.<<<<

Exactly!

>>>The Russians have been fighting these vermin a lot longer than most nations

And they are giving up. That is real news here: not Ahmadinejad’s “culture of expectation” but that prominent Orthodox figures close to the ruling apparatus in Russia would contemplate how “in the final battle, Muslims and Christians are on the same side of the barricades”.<<<

I don’t think Russians are giving up and Iran is not that much about Islam too.
Islam is a showcase ideology for them but the reality Iran is more a fascist state, just like Russia. Islam is simply providing enough reasoning to be hard on their opponents. Both Iran and Russia unhappy with liberal influence and global bankster oligarchy in the first place. Both see expansionist jihad and China as a threat.
It won’t be incorrect to say that there is a popular dissent in Iran against Islam even as a showcase ideology. Imams who are too anal in their hate preaching are getting kicked by girls wearing European style clothes on a regular basis.
Russians are covertly backing secularism there as well.


13 posted on 07/13/2013 11:02:14 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish
I agree that Russia and Iran have a good basis for mutual understanding outside of the difference in religion. Certainly, one cannot fault any Christian nation for developing normal and even friendly relations with Muslim countries.

What Russia is giving up is its identity as an Orthodox country of ethnic Russians. This is being gradually displaced with a multicultural mix of Slav and Asian stock where the energy, brutality, and firmness of belief of the Muslims overcomes the Russian culture weakened to the point of collapse by 70 years of artificial selection and state atheism.



Chechen leader Kadyrov, a loyal Russian



"Moskvabad"



These are Chechen children. Protect them from Russian fascists

14 posted on 07/13/2013 12:42:38 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: cunning_fish
Iran is more a fascist state, just like Russia

I don't know about Iran, -- although the fact they they just elected themselves a new leader, howbeit in a similar to the previous one mold, shows that at least one aspect of fascism is absent: a preference for a strong leader who hardly needs further elections.

In case of Russia, Putin is set to rule for another decade or so, while his persona is nowadays subject of humiliating cartoons more than of admiration. But fascism for Russia would be an improvement: the cornerstone of fascism is a clearly set national goal favoring the "home nation", and that is lacking completely. In Putin's Russia nationalists are put in jail. How is that "fascism"?

I would describe Putin's political system as a clique of former KGB operatives who know enough to reject communist ideology, don't know enough about capitalism, admire their ugly creation, the USSR, as an empire they once built, and now seek to rebuild it by throwing religiosity and Soviet-style "internationalism" in the mix with stratospheric, 3rd-world-level corruption.

15 posted on 07/14/2013 10:55:58 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: nuconvert; annalex; gandalftb
How popular is Dugin in Russia?

He is more popular in the Russian Army and in the security establishment (searching for a cause when Marx is dead) than in the office of Putin. But, Dugin has made the strange idea about Euroasianism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasia_Movement acceptable in Russia.

Russia, or persons representing the state, are profiting on the Iranian sanctions and are laundering money and oil from Iran, thus they do not want a solution of the present situation. I anticipate that Iran want to end their dependence on Russia, but the do not know how to do it.

Note that the Russian economy requires an oil price 120-130 /bbl in order for break even of their budget. The next time that the oil price will be parked for months below, say, 80/bbl there will be a new revolution in Russia as they run out of money. Putin knows this and that is why Russia is supporting problems in Middle East to keep the oil price high.

16 posted on 07/14/2013 2:07:44 PM PDT by AdmSmith (GCTGATATGTCTATGATTACTCAT)
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additional reading http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2013/06/russia-response-turkish-protests-gezi.html


17 posted on 07/14/2013 2:12:36 PM PDT by AdmSmith (GCTGATATGTCTATGATTACTCAT)
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To: AdmSmith
there will be a new revolution in Russia

Of that, we cannot be sure, unfortunately. The people have been conditioned into docility. Thank you for your analysis, right on.

18 posted on 07/14/2013 2:18:43 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: AdmSmith

Thanks - appreciate your insight


19 posted on 07/14/2013 2:18:54 PM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: annalex

>>>Note that the Russian economy requires an oil price 120-130 /bbl in order for break even of their budget. The next time that the oil price will be parked for months below, say, 80/bbl there will be a new revolution in Russia as they run out of money. Putin knows this and that is why Russia is supporting problems in Middle East to keep the oil price high.<<<

Last time I’ve check Russian economy wasn’t that much about oil as advertised. They have a share of extraction about on par with US in total economy and manufacturing makes larger share in Russian economy than it makes for US.

>>>I would describe Putin’s political system as a clique of former KGB operatives who know enough to reject communist ideology, don’t know enough about capitalism, admire their ugly creation, the USSR, as an empire they once built, and now seek to rebuild it by throwing religiosity and Soviet-style “internationalism” in the mix with stratospheric, 3rd-world-level corruption.<<<

The advantage of such a regime is that it brings unprecedented level of opportunities in Russian history for literally everyone not too lazy to use it.
Every idiot is able to make some $20,000 a year there, and it is in a country there you can survive a month for $200 in gas and utilities and another $150 in foods.


20 posted on 07/14/2013 11:19:44 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish
unprecedented level of opportunities in Russian history for literally everyone

What opportunities? Every business venture is under ethnic mafias, or is raided by the government thugs so that a One Russia (Putin's political "party") apparatchik can take over.

The structure of household expenses is indeed different for those who live in their parents' apartments from the Soviet era, for free. Social mobility requires ability to move, and rents and mortgages quickly turn $20K into what is it in the rest of the world, $20K.

wasn’t that much about oil as advertised

What else is it about?

Russian statistics are about as reliable as the Soviet statistics.

21 posted on 07/15/2013 5:43:35 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: cunning_fish
Last time I’ve check Russian economy wasn’t that much about oil as advertised. They have a share of extraction about on par with US in total economy and manufacturing makes larger share in Russian economy than it makes for US.

You might update your info:
The Russian government requires an oil price of above $125 in order to achieve fiscal breakeven. That means that the Russian government is being forced to either postpone spending, or dip into cash reserves, as long as oil prices stay well below that level.
http://oilprice.com/Energy/Oil-Prices/What-Would-Falling-Oil-Prices-do-to-Russias-Geopolitical-Ambitions.html

22 posted on 07/15/2013 6:59:20 AM PDT by AdmSmith (GCTGATATGTCTATGATTACTCAT)
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To: nuconvert; annalex; gandalftb
If the rumors is correct that Israel has 250 bn barrels of oil (about 150 bn bbl is shale oil), it would for sure make a difference not only on the oil price but as well on the politics in ME. We can see big changes within a few years time.
23 posted on 07/15/2013 7:07:24 AM PDT by AdmSmith (GCTGATATGTCTATGATTACTCAT)
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To: annalex

I don’t know where are you getting it from. I’m particularly familiar with Middle Ural region of Russia (Yekaterinburg city and metro area). Like all the Urals it has little oil and gas if any. Despite that fact Middle Urals (or Sverdlovsk oblast) considered a Russia’s “donor” region. To make things clear I’ll tell that states in Russia divided in two groups of ‘donor’ and ‘recipient’ states. Donors are developed regions and they don’t get any finance from federal government (or supposed oil money you are talking about) and depressive recipient regions’ deficits are financed from their surplus budgets.
Despite getting zero federal (oil?) money, complete lack of oil&gas industry and also being a donor for less fortunate states like Chechnya or Dagestan, Yekaterinburg region is booming. They have numerous recently built 40 and 50+ story buildings in a downtown, the whole city is just like one construction site. There are numerous shopping malls, restaurants full of well dressed people driving around in new SUVs. I guess none of these people are in oil business, a really few of them are mobsters or government employees but they are still OK. What is wrong with this picture?


24 posted on 07/15/2013 7:30:25 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: AdmSmith

I think it will be enough for them to cut some social programs to be solvent again.


25 posted on 07/15/2013 7:32:55 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=srR_F6vQYwo

Look at that city, I have just find a video of it on YouTube. A big industrial town on the very edge of Siberia, a town in a class of Detroit or Cleveland but look at how clean and peaceful it is. You can scroll bars in the middle of the night in inner city without risk of getting killed too. Does it looks like a third world hellhole you are talking about?


26 posted on 07/15/2013 9:00:47 AM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish
I think it will be enough for them to cut some social programs to be solvent again.

Is this what you asked for:
The Russian government approved the next three-year budget on July 4. The fiscal plan cuts spending on education and health in favour of a boost for the armed forces.
http://www.bne.eu/story5166/MOSCOW_BLOG_Russia_to_buy_guns_instead_of_books

27 posted on 07/15/2013 11:18:04 AM PDT by AdmSmith (GCTGATATGTCTATGATTACTCAT)
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To: cunning_fish

Remember that pig farm manager complaining how impossible it was for him to get any business done with the power structures the way they are? He was from Yekateringurg area.

And, if things are so great, where is foreign investment in Russia?


28 posted on 07/15/2013 5:12:57 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

I haven’t said it is heaven but I know people doing business and pretty OK there. If it is so good to run a business in US, Canada or France, why all the businesses are moving to SE Asia?


29 posted on 07/15/2013 6:02:12 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish
I know people doing business and pretty OK there

Well, so do I, but you are the first not to complain of the pervasive corruption and constant threat of a takeover by better-connected competitor. Plus it does nothing for people on fixed income.

We are not a rose garden here, but the pattern vis-a-vis SE Asia is not relocation but off-shoring labor.

30 posted on 07/15/2013 7:17:26 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

>>>I know people doing business and pretty OK there
Well, so do I, but you are the first not to complain of the pervasive corruption and constant threat of a takeover by better-connected competitor. Plus it does nothing for people on fixed income.

We are not a rose garden here, but the pattern vis-a-vis SE Asia is not relocation but off-shoring labor.<<<

Me too. My first observation is you have to keep out of people who claim they are connected and solves all your problems in Russia.
Thus, it is hard not to swallow a bait under a stress of new environment.
They are a recipe of disaster creating that same problem they are supposed to solve.
I think some 70% of corruption problems foreign businesses expierenced there are just a drama by these “helpers” to steal your money under false pretext of bribing some official or giving it out to mafia for protection.
The problem is these people corrupts your business if trusted too much and one day you can have real problems but it is nothing but your own fault.

Do your business as clean as possible, have a good lawyer and they won’t ever touch you.


31 posted on 07/15/2013 7:59:48 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: cunning_fish
you have to keep out of people who claim they are connected

That won't work so well if they ARE connected.

32 posted on 07/16/2013 5:25:43 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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