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Family sugar remedy tested for healing people's wounds
BBC News ^ | 14 February 2013 | N/A

Posted on 02/15/2013 10:03:49 AM PST by Freeport

A nurse is researching whether an old family remedy using sugar to heal wounds does actually work.

Moses Murandu, from Zimbabwe, grew up watching his father use granulated sugar to treat wounds.

Sugar is thought to draw water away from wounds and prevent bacteria from multiplying.

Early results from a trial on 35 hospital patients in Birmingham are encouraging, but more research is needed.

One of the patients who received sugar treatment on a wound was 62-year-old Alan Bayliss from Birmingham.

He had undergone an above-the knee amputation on his right leg at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham and, as part of the surgery, a vein was removed from his left leg leaving a wound which would not heal properly.

Murandu, who is studying for a doctorate at Birmingham University, was contacted and asked to treat the wound with sugar.

Fast recovery

Mr Bayliss said: "It has been revolutionary. The actual wound was very deep - it was almost as big as my finger.

"When Moses first did the dressing he almost used the whole pot of sugar, but two weeks later he only needed to use four or five teaspoons.

"I am very pleased indeed. I feel that it has speeded up my recovery a lot, and it has been a positive step forward. I was a little sceptical at first but once I saw the sugar in operation and how much it was drawing the wound out, I was impressed."

The randomised control trial at three West Midlands hospitals is only half way through. So far 35 patients have been treated with sugar treatment.

Murandu, a senior lecturer in adult nursing at the University of Wolverhampton, said he was very pleased by the results.

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: healingwounds; health; injury; medicine; sugar; sugarremedy; sugartreatment; wounds; zimbabwe
Not sure what to make of this, but if the dehydration theory is correct, then other materials with better water retention and sterility than sugar should work even better.
1 posted on 02/15/2013 10:04:02 AM PST by Freeport
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To: Freeport
"... I was a little sceptical at first ...

Better to be 'sceptical' than septicemic...........

2 posted on 02/15/2013 10:09:37 AM PST by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: Freeport
People have been using honey to heal wounds for millenia. Whatever it is about honey that prevents it from spoiling may be a germfighting factor in wounds.
3 posted on 02/15/2013 10:10:14 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: Freeport

Makes sense. I once worked for a company that makes a popular citrus drink, and the only line they did not clean out with a chlorine solution was the “sugar”, which probably was corn syrup. It was explained to me that bacteria couldn’t survive in the dense sugar. It would explode due to osmosis.


4 posted on 02/15/2013 10:12:14 AM PST by Jeff Chandler (WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?)
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To: Freeport

My grandmother told me that ages ago.


5 posted on 02/15/2013 10:14:17 AM PST by SMARTY ("The man who has no inner-life is a slave to his surroundings. "Henri Frederic Amiel)
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To: Freeport

If this treatment turns out to be effective, it will not be long before other substances will be tried.
I read once that honey has been used for centuries for wounds, so who knows what will come of this.


6 posted on 02/15/2013 10:15:14 AM PST by svcw (Why is one cell on another planet considered life, and in the womb it is not.)
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To: Freeport

No big secret that sugar has antibacterial and antifungal qualities. That’s why cookies will keep on the counter, while bread will mold.


7 posted on 02/15/2013 10:17:14 AM PST by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: Jeff Chandler

I remember from microbiology that no bacteria grows on sugar.
(not a microbiologist, but that’s what I remember)


8 posted on 02/15/2013 10:18:50 AM PST by spankalib (The downside of liberty is the need to tolerate those who despise it.)
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To: hinckley buzzard
People have been using honey to heal wounds for millenia.

That was the first thing I thought of too.

I suppose the use of sugar as a food preservative will have to wait for someone from Zimbabwe to "invent" it as well.

Mr. niteowl77

9 posted on 02/15/2013 10:18:50 AM PST by niteowl77 (Oh, crap.)
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To: Freeport

In a related story, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has banned the use of sugar for any purpose within the limits of New York City.


10 posted on 02/15/2013 10:21:29 AM PST by twister881
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To: Freeport

bttt


11 posted on 02/15/2013 10:23:09 AM PST by deweyfrank
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To: Freeport

If you don’t have Quick-clot or Celox to staunch a non-arterial bleed, pack as much sugar as you have into the wound and hit it with a pressure bandage. It works......saw it on an episode of Burn Notice (then confirmed by an Army medic).

Honey has been used as an anti-bacterial for bandaging wounds since ancient times.


12 posted on 02/15/2013 10:30:29 AM PST by petro45acp (No good endeavour survives an excess of adult supervision)
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To: Freeport
Not a new treatment regime. They were trying this out at Fort Sam and Wilford Hall medical centers in 1972.

I don't know if they figured out why it worked, but it did seem to reduce infections and the scars were less noticeable, but that may because of the type of wounds sugar was being used on. In my case it was mid-thickness burns.

13 posted on 02/15/2013 10:38:28 AM PST by pfflier
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To: Freeport

I use this sometimes. I live in Sentani, Papua, Indonesia and drugs aren’t always available. Sugar does help.

Basically, take granulated sugar and pack it into the wound as much as possible. Cover with bandage. Change the bandage after 6 hours, using sugar with each change.

I don’t know the mechanics of action, but it does help. Honey does an adequate job, but sugar is better.


14 posted on 02/15/2013 10:39:45 AM PST by Jemian
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To: petro45acp

Horsemen have used sugar to pack wounds for years. We also mix sugar and iodine to pack in hooves that have infections.


15 posted on 02/15/2013 10:40:39 AM PST by Himyar
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To: Freeport

Sugar? Possibly.
Pre-WW2, they used glycerin rinse for oral wounds as it killed the germs. Glycerin is a sweetener.


16 posted on 02/15/2013 10:44:10 AM PST by BuffaloJack (Guns should not be illegal; they should be undocumented.)
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To: svcw

“If this treatment turns out to be effective, it will not be long before...”

...the FDA comes after the perps using the treatment...gotta protect the profits of the big drug companies, you know...


17 posted on 02/15/2013 10:46:15 AM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders.)
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To: Jeff Chandler

Bacteria does not grow on honey either. Think about it. It is made by germ infested bees.


18 posted on 02/15/2013 10:52:47 AM PST by fuente
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To: Jeff Chandler

Bacteria does not grow on honey either. Think about it. It is made by germ infested bees.


19 posted on 02/15/2013 10:53:15 AM PST by fuente
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To: Jemian

jemian, when repacking, do you have to rinse out the wound with anything or just open old bandage, throw in more sugar and apply fresh bandages?


20 posted on 02/15/2013 11:05:14 AM PST by roofgoat
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To: pfflier; niteowl77

Uh, I believe that Sugar was also used to treat wounds in the Napoleonic Wars.

As someone else pointed out, sugar naturally is not supportive of bacteria. Jam, cookies, cake, jelly, doughnuts stuff like that just don’t spoil. Ever wonder why? Sugar of course and no bacteria.

Of course, we all know that nothing now can can be valid unless it is discovered by one from the cradle of all civilization... Zimbabwe.

I wish I had a black heritage too so I could be smart and discover s@#t and all kinda stuff like dat.

What a crock.


21 posted on 02/15/2013 11:07:31 AM PST by Sequoyah101
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To: pfflier; niteowl77

Uh, I believe that Sugar was also used to treat wounds in the Napoleonic Wars. It helps but if it was all that great the trials at Fort Sam would have made it a standard or it would have survived the wars and antibiotics would not have been invented. Don’t cite the profit motive. There was need for something better and it got invented.

As someone else pointed out, sugar naturally is not supportive of bacteria. Jam, cookies, cake, jelly, doughnuts stuff like that just don’t spoil. Ever wonder why? Sugar of course and no bacteria.

Of course, we all know that nothing now can can be valid unless it is discovered by one from the cradle of all civilization... Zimbabwe.

I wish I had a black heritage too so I could be smart and discover s@#t and all kinda stuff like dat.

What a crock.


22 posted on 02/15/2013 11:09:16 AM PST by Sequoyah101
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To: Freeport

Even if it does work, before long Moochelle will be forcing us to use Sweet N Low instead.


23 posted on 02/15/2013 11:25:04 AM PST by bigbob
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To: Freeport

It works. The sugar causes the blood to clot.


24 posted on 02/15/2013 11:25:04 AM PST by Little Ray (Waiting for the return of the Gods of the Copybook Headings.)
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Meat curing (ham, bacon, guanciale, etc...) uses salt and suger/honey to prevent harmful bacteria from forming. I just made my first apple smoked ham last Sunday. http://www.pelletsmoking.com/pellet-smoking-com-lounge-9/first-ham-attempt-mak-6019/

Makes sense to me that sugar is a way to treat certain wounds. Obviously it’s not practical for certain types of infections. You cant shove granulated sugar up your nose for a sinus infection.


25 posted on 02/15/2013 11:38:23 AM PST by Tailback
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To: Freeport

Mama’s sugar when she kisses her toddler’s boo boo really does help.


26 posted on 02/15/2013 11:39:12 AM PST by Graybeard58 (_.. ._. .. _. _._ __ ___ ._. . ___ ..._ ._ ._.. _ .. _. .)
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To: Himyar

Sugar and Iodine.....gonna remember that!

Thanks


27 posted on 02/15/2013 11:39:17 AM PST by petro45acp (No good endeavour survives an excess of adult supervision)
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To: fuente
It is made by germ infested bees.


28 posted on 02/15/2013 11:45:55 AM PST by Jeff Chandler (WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES IT MAKE?)
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To: Freeport

I have been studying sugar cured hams for years; I wonder if this treatment has the potential to make one delicious as well as healthy.

Freegards


29 posted on 02/15/2013 11:48:18 AM PST by Ransomed
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To: Jemian; roofgoat
Basically, take granulated sugar and pack it into the wound as much as possible. Cover with bandage. Change the bandage after 6 hours, using sugar with each change.

Could you give us a little more detail, maybe walk us through treating a single deep bad wound?

30 posted on 02/15/2013 11:51:24 AM PST by ansel12 (Romney is a longtime supporter of homosexualizing the Boy Scouts (and the military).)
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To: Freeport

I remember the use of sugar and I think peroxide for bed ulcers back in the early and mid seventies. Used in nursing homes and some hospitals.


31 posted on 02/15/2013 11:54:58 AM PST by Chickensoup (200 million unarmed people killed in the 20th century by Leftist Totalitarian Fascists)
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To: ansel12

It’s that simple. I used it for my sting ray wound that didn’t heal for 5 months. After 3 days of dry granulated sugar sprinkled onto the wound on my foot it started healing. This after those high $$ wound treatments and surgery. The sugar worked. Sprinkle it in ( liberally) the wound, cover with a bandage and change frequently, oh every 8 hours or so.


32 posted on 02/15/2013 12:04:18 PM PST by R.I.chopper
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To: Freeport

Wine and honey is ancient treatment for wounds and honey is being sold as a healing agent even today.


33 posted on 02/15/2013 12:08:48 PM PST by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough)
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To: R.I.chopper

Thanks, as someone who has to largely self treat, I like picking up a useful treatment for wounds.


34 posted on 02/15/2013 1:20:43 PM PST by ansel12 (Romney is a longtime supporter of homosexualizing the Boy Scouts (and the military).)
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To: roofgoat

I usually just repack as most, if not all, of the sugar is absorbed. Of course, if there is debrie that should be removed, that ought to be cleaned out. For that I use ivory soap, which I bring with me from the states, or hydrogen peroxide.

I first started using sugar years ago for an ant bite here, that had ulcerated. After a week the wound was as large as a dime and not healing. Sugar as a treatment was suggested and so I put about a fourth of a teaspoon on the wound. That night when I changed the bandage, the would was less red and a bit smaller. It took a few days but where there was no healing, it was now closed.

I do have a bit of a scar, though.


35 posted on 02/15/2013 3:25:30 PM PST by Jemian
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To: ansel12

There really isn’t much more to tell. Clean the wound. Use a soap w/o perfumes or additives, just plain soap. Perhaps rinse the wound with hydrogen peroxide a few times. I suspect this doesn’t do more tham bring debrie close to the surface where it can be removed. Then sprinkle sugar in, not just one layer, but mound it in until the sugar is slightly higher than the surface of the skin. Cover with a bandage. Repeat every six hours or so until completely healed.

As was noted above, if this was a sovereign remedy, there would be no need for antibiotics to have been developed. However, as in the case of my ant bite, triple-biotic ointment didn’t help. So, I tried sugar and got better.


36 posted on 02/15/2013 3:47:26 PM PST by Jemian
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To: count-your-change

I’m going to try this. Have a chronic ulceration/lesion that changes and migrates somewhat, but has been around for 20 years. Biopses didn’t ever find an infection so who knows if it will work. I guess the worse that can happen is it will make more than the usual mess. Many times I considered using sugar and/or honey but didn’t ever actually do it.


37 posted on 02/15/2013 3:57:50 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by Nature, not NurtureĀ™)
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To: Jemian

That was a very good description, it gave me the picture that I was looking for, thanks.


38 posted on 02/15/2013 4:01:33 PM PST by ansel12 (Romney is a longtime supporter of homosexualizing the Boy Scouts (and the military).)
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