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Phillips 66 moving Bakken oil by rail in $1B deal
Fuel Fix ^ | January 9, 2013 | Zain Shauk

Posted on 01/09/2013 8:51:51 AM PST by thackney

Phillips 66 has begun shipping crude by rail from North Dakota to a refinery in New Jersey in an effort estimated at more than $1 billion.

The company said this week it had signed a five-year deal with Global Partners to move oil produced in the Bakken shale play to its Bayway refinery.

The Bayway refinery, the largest on the east coast, is already receiving crude through the deal, which will move 91 million barrels of oil over the contract term, or about 50,000 barrels a day, Phillips 66 spokesman Dennis Nuss said. The refinery is expected to receive crude on a daily basis, except during maintenance or other interruptions in activity, Nuss said.

The oil will be moved by rail from North Dakota to a terminal in Albany, N.Y., where it will be loaded onto barges and shipped down the Hudson River to the Bayway refinery.

Phillips 66 did not reveal the price of the contract.

Based on the cost of shipping oil by rail at that distance and then moving it by barge, estimated at between $13 and $15 a barrel, the contract is likely worth between $1.1 billion and $1.5 billion, said Greg Haas, manager of research at Hart Energy in Houston.

The deal will leave Bayway in a strong position, with a steady stream of crude that is priced well below oil imported to east coast refineries from overseas, Haas said.

“Bayway is going to have strong crude purchasing fundamentals because of this rail deal, in addition to the strong energy price fundamentals,” Haas said.

Haas said Bakken crude was trading Tuesday at around $87 a barrel, which compares to close to $112 for Brent crude, which is used as a benchmark for world oil prices.

If Bakken oil continues to sell at a discount to Brent, the price difference will result in a savings for Phillips 66, even with a shipping fee of as much as $15 a barrel, Haas said.

“This refinery has a pretty positive outlook in my opinion,” he said.

The contract will use Global Partners’ network of loading facilities and offloading terminals, according to a Phillips 66 announcement.

“Global has established a ‘virtual pipeline’ for the reliable transportation of Bakken crude,” said Tim Taylor, Phillips 66’s executive vice president of commercial, marketing, transportation and business development. “Our five-year agreement with Global assures us long-term access to advantaged crude for our Bayway refinery through what we believe is a cost competitive origin-to-destination supply system to the east coast.”


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: New Jersey; US: New York; US: North Dakota
KEYWORDS: energy; globalpartners; oil; oilrail; oin; phillips66; rail
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1 posted on 01/09/2013 8:51:58 AM PST by thackney
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To: thackney

Who is it again, who’s been investing in railroad companies? I think it’s some sort of Buffet or restaraunt company with deep pockets and political influence?


2 posted on 01/09/2013 8:56:55 AM PST by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: thackney

Well, that’s certainly much better than trying to move it through some stupid pipeline where it would get handled a lot less. Thankfully trains never derail whereas pipelines are rupturing almost hourly. Lucky there were no rail cars on the ferry that just crashed in NYC huh?

Molon labe!


3 posted on 01/09/2013 8:58:27 AM PST by rktman
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To: blackdog

Who is it again, who’s been investing in railroad companies? .................................Bingo! My thoughts exactly, one of the benefits of being an insider in Gov’t.. Follow the $$$ see who is cashing in on the deal. Someone is having their pockets lined for sure.


4 posted on 01/09/2013 9:00:04 AM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Who we elect is not as important as who they bring in with them.)
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To: thackney

Maybe I should look for a bump in that PSX stock.


5 posted on 01/09/2013 9:00:32 AM PST by DeFault User
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To: thackney

Interesting. There’s an extensive rail network in place around BayWay. It pretty packed in though with the storage tanks and residential area of Elizabeth though so perhaps there’s no room to make a depot to offload the oil from the rail cars directly.

Definitely good news for this area of New Jersey.

Come back home to the refinery
Hiring man said “son if it was up to me”


6 posted on 01/09/2013 9:02:31 AM PST by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
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To: Bringbackthedraft

Warren Buffett owns his-self an entire railroad. His secretary also pays a higher tax rate than he does. Or at least until they fixed that with the fiscal cliffy thingie, taxing just those evil billionares!


7 posted on 01/09/2013 9:04:08 AM PST by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: rktman

Stupid pipelines make WAY too much economic sense for the Current Regime to seriously consider construction. The White Hut’s “business model” is to make commercial operations so expensive and uncompetitive as to drive out any other future investment from commercial sources.

Then, of course, they step in to provide “venture capital” as a prelude for an excuse to later nationalize that particular industry. Of course, you understand, only failing industries get that sort of “assistance”.

Oil pipelines are not sufficiently close to failing just yet.


8 posted on 01/09/2013 9:16:45 AM PST by alloysteel (Bronco Bama - the cowboy who whooped up and widened the stampede.)
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To: thackney

100 rail tank cars every day ?


9 posted on 01/09/2013 9:18:11 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: thackney

I wish Freepers would actually research the facts before mouthing off about topics they do not understand. Phillips 66’s deal involves a single-line movement by Canadian Pacific Railway from North Dakota to a barge dock in Albany, NY, then downriver to Bayway, New Jersey.

http://www.progressiverailroading.com/canadian_pacific/article/Global-Partners-Canadian-Pacific-to-transport-Bakken-crude-for-Phillips-66—34798#

BNSF handles crude oil from North Dakota to eastern connections at Chicago (CSXT and Norfolk Southern) bound for northeastern refineries as well. I’m unaware of any pipelines being proposed from the Bakken region to the Northeast. Furthermore, Bakken production far exceeds any proposed future pipeline capacity to Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, so the rail option is needed regardless.


10 posted on 01/09/2013 9:21:44 AM PST by railroader
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To: railroader

I’d bet on a 50-60 day round trip for the cars. To do 50,000 bbls/day requires loading 100 cars every day.

At some point, they will run out of rail cars because every tank car in the US will be “in service” or returning to reload.


11 posted on 01/09/2013 9:55:52 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: railroader

“The oil will be moved by rail from North Dakota to a terminal in Albany, N.Y., where it will be loaded onto barges and shipped down the Hudson River to the Bayway refinery”

Most people ASSUME that the only railroad moving out of ND is the BNSF. This is not the first deal like this. JD Irving made a deal similar to this to bring Balkan oil to his refinery in St. John, New Brunswick on the Atlantic Ocean. I believe that also is being shipped across Canada on the CPRS.

What they really need is a canal from Buffalo to Albany that could handle barge traffic off the Great Lakes. (sarc)


12 posted on 01/09/2013 10:08:44 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: railroader
Bakken production far exceeds any proposed future pipeline capacity to Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana

Bakken Oil production has reached 682,393 BPD.

https://www.dmr.nd.gov/oilgas/stats/historicalbakkenoilstats.pdf

The completed Keystone XL by Transcanada would add 510,000 BPD.

Bakken Crude Express Pipeline by ONEOK Partners will add 200,000 BPD.

Steelman pipeline project by Enbridge will carry 145,000 BPD.

Other pipelines are in various planning stages as well.

http://seekingalpha.com/article/797881-investment-potential-in-bakken-pipeline-takeaway-infrastructure

13 posted on 01/09/2013 10:09:31 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

They will make more rail cars.


14 posted on 01/09/2013 10:10:28 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: Bringbackthedraft

Not this specific project but enlarging in ND:

BNSF increases Bakken oil-hauling capacity to 1 million barrels a day
http://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/bnsf-increases-bakken-oil-hauling-capacity-to-million-barrels-a/article_15b99d84-76e1-58fc-9f35-143449300a1d.html#ixzz2HVH3z0Vp


15 posted on 01/09/2013 10:24:09 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
The completed Keystone XL by Transcanada would add 510,000 BPD.

Trans Canada's Keystone XL Pipeline is designed to transport crude oil from Alberta, not North Dakota, to the Gulf Coast.

In addition, Bakken formation production may peak at 1 million BPD then decline steadily after that. The huge investment in pipelines may prove unnecessary, especially since a large portion of that production will go to northeastern US refineries.

16 posted on 01/09/2013 10:24:42 AM PST by railroader
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To: blackdog; Bringbackthedraft
Mr. Buffett owns Burlington Northern. This movement is on the Canadian Pacific.

The free market is so unfair.

17 posted on 01/09/2013 10:25:52 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
I’d bet on a 50-60 day round trip for the cars. To do 50,000 bbls/day requires loading 100 cars every day.

Crude oil moves in 100-car unit trains. This eliminates the need to classify and re-classify at several yards between origin and destination. Turnaround time should be more like two weeks.
18 posted on 01/09/2013 10:29:57 AM PST by railroader
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To: railroader

The Keystone XL includes loading points for the Bakken area.

It certainly would move a lot of Alberta oil/bitumen, but it plans to move oil out of ND as well.

There are several other pipelines planned as well, not to mention the majority of the Bakken Crude moves out on existing pipelines already.


19 posted on 01/09/2013 10:30:21 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Mr. Lucky
That's what mergers and acquisitions are for...........

Good point though for the sake of fairness.

20 posted on 01/09/2013 10:33:32 AM PST by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: railroader

Would look like it takes the Canadian route from Winnipeg to Montreal, then south to Albany, NY.

As a NJ resident, happy to see BayWay find a long term contract that is under market costs, the refinery is old and inefficient and prone to breakdowns, (and hurricane flooding ), it’s future is always in doubt due to a myriad of problems and a regulatory environment run by pinheads.

The equivalent costs to take a pipeline to TX/LA is not the total transportation cost of end use refined products, TX/LA refineries still have to load the products on tankers and move them tobarges to move them to Albany/Newburgh/Linden/Carteret/Port Reading gas terminals to get the products to the NYC metro market.


21 posted on 01/09/2013 10:48:24 AM PST by JerseyHighlander
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To: railroader

Not likely in a multi line haul...


22 posted on 01/09/2013 10:49:51 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: woodbutcher1963

$120,000 each.


23 posted on 01/09/2013 10:50:55 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

And delivery of new cars ordered today would be mid 2014 at the earliest.


24 posted on 01/09/2013 10:53:31 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Mr. Lucky
Mr. Buffett owns Burlington Northern. This movement is on the Canadian Pacific.

The big winner here is Bill Ackman, the largest investor in Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. -Tom

25 posted on 01/09/2013 10:54:54 AM PST by Capt. Tom
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The haul across country on a typical flatbed railcar is about $6000-7000. I am not sure what the railroads get for a tanker. However, I would think it is similar. Therefore, the revenue pay off is about 20 trips. I am not sure of the costs to haul it across on a train with 100 other cars. I would think they would pay off a capital investment like new tanker cars in a 2-3 year period.


26 posted on 01/09/2013 11:12:53 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: woodbutcher1963

$13~15 per barrel seems to be in line with that cost to transport. But that cost is not all profit. Do you know the typical margin in rail traffic?


27 posted on 01/09/2013 11:29:40 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: woodbutcher1963

I think you’re right about the rate. Rental is $750 to $1,000/month (most cars are leased) plus about $9 to $10/bbl for the haul. Figure +/- 500 bbls per car.

I work with tank cars and freight rates every day. Unit train or no unit train, I don’t think a cross country run is doable in two weeks however. More like 6-8 weeks round trip.


28 posted on 01/09/2013 12:12:55 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

So a 50,000 BPD delivery would require about 5,000 dedicated rail car fleet?


29 posted on 01/09/2013 12:37:02 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

With a continuous movement like this one, the RR tend to improve switching, etc., so it might not take a full 5,000 cars. I’d bet it would take all of 4,000 though...


30 posted on 01/09/2013 12:48:02 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

A straight through train will make it from SK to NY or VT in 4-5 days or less. These trains do not stop except to change crews.
They operate similar to a coal train where all 100 cars on the train carry the exact same commodity and are all going to the same power plant. There are no stops along the way to interchange and remove cars that are to be deliverd in Winnipeg, Thunder Bay, Toronto, or Montreal. It is about 2300 miles from Portal, SK to Albany, NY. Keep in mind these trains travel 24 hours a day.

Once they are in NY, the backup is how long does it take to unload the cars and get them turned around. I am sure they do not have a siding to unload more than 10-15 cars a day. It may take a week just to unload the train once it is in port. Hey its logistics.


31 posted on 01/09/2013 1:00:08 PM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
Not likely in a multi line haul...

The originating railroad's locomotives run through to destination. Or exchange of power at the interchange point is well-coordinated. In any case, transit times are likely no more than a week in each direction (and could be as little as four or five days). Only stops made are for crew changes and to wait for other train traffic.
32 posted on 01/09/2013 1:12:54 PM PST by railroader
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To: woodbutcher1963
Coal trains fly via continuous welded rail and on a one line haul out of Gillette. Moving from ND to the east will not be as easy.
To your question on weights, tank cars are 263,000 pounds gross, with typical 188,900 pounds net. The difference is the weight of the car.

My business deals in the heavy oils; asphalts, residuals, roofing flux and similar products. Much of the product I move is negative gravity (0 to -4 API.) A tanker load of flux might contain 22,000 gross gallons but be sold as 19,900 net gallons (corrected to 60 F.)

33 posted on 01/09/2013 1:19:26 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: thackney
The Keystone XL includes loading points for the Bakken area. It certainly would move a lot of Alberta oil/bitumen, but it plans to move oil out of ND as well. There are several other pipelines planned as well, not to mention the majority of the Bakken Crude moves out on existing pipelines already.

Exactly. A lot of the pipeline capacity will be used by the Alberta oil sands, so Bakken production will always exceed pipeline capacity, present or future. Since Bakken ships to more than just Texas and Louisiana refineries, and that there is little or no pipeline capacity to northeastern points, the railroad is the only way to go in some cases.

Warren Buffet's opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline may or may not have to do with him owning BNSF, but the railroads were getting crude oil business before the pipeline was even announced. They were able to do this because a lot of 30,000 gallon tank cars intended for ethanol service in the mid-2000s were left in storage. Now that the Bakken oil business is good for the railroads and shippers, new tank cars built for crude oil shipments are being purchased by leasing companies and at least one shipper (Phillips 66).
34 posted on 01/09/2013 1:23:02 PM PST by railroader
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To: railroader
CNI has been a good stock to own.....

If I recall correctly...BNSF was bot by Buffet in '09....Probably after him and Obanana had a meeting.

35 posted on 01/09/2013 1:41:00 PM PST by Osage Orange (MOLON LABE)
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To: railroader

Can the super jumbos go east ?

I don’t use anything but 23,500’s.


36 posted on 01/09/2013 2:14:34 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: woodbutcher1963

I have always wanted to take a trip down this canal. Something in the order of a 52 foot Sea Ray with a pilot would be to my liking...


37 posted on 01/09/2013 2:35:43 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: woodbutcher1963
I am sure they do not have a siding to unload more than 10-15 cars a day.

How can they deliver 50,000 BPD unloading only 15 cars per day. Don't they need to average 100 cars per day?

38 posted on 01/09/2013 3:25:44 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

I’m rooting for them to succeed but the volume in all this is a bit intimidating.

I keep seeing the proposed 100 car trains being loaded every day, slamming into the reality of railroading in the eastern US.

What this proposes is much more than utility supply unit trains (where the utility owns the cars and wants to see them move.) The eastern rail lines have too many choke points for the proposed 100 cars/day.


39 posted on 01/09/2013 8:00:05 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Now multiply that challenge by at least 10 and you get the volume the Keystone XL would be delivering.


40 posted on 01/10/2013 5:01:01 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
Can the super jumbos go east ? I don’t use anything but 23,500’s.

Not sure. Crude is denser than ethanol so 23,500 is probably correct.
41 posted on 01/10/2013 5:44:22 AM PST by railroader
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To: thackney
Now multiply that challenge by at least 10 and you get the volume the Keystone XL would be delivering.

Not to the east, and not with all that Alberta crude...
42 posted on 01/10/2013 5:45:58 AM PST by railroader
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To: railroader

No sorry. I wasn’t trying to imply it was going East.

I was just trying to put in perspective the volume the Keystone XL would carry and the difficulty of picking up that volume with rail.

Rail will help and rail will and should be used. But it really is a supplement to the huge volumes carried on major pipelines; it is not a reasonable replacement for major pipelines.


43 posted on 01/10/2013 5:56:15 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

What is the API gravity of the Keystone crude ?


44 posted on 01/10/2013 6:08:50 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (In the game of life, there are no betting limits)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
There is no classification of Keystone crude.

The pipeline would move crude oil and dilbit from multiple fields with varying API. It would pick up Alberta oil sands and Bakken along with some others.

The majority would be diluted bitumen or upgraded bitumen (syncrude)

45 posted on 01/10/2013 6:37:03 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney; Eric in the Ozarks; woodbutcher1963
The participants in this move are well heeled and very efficient at what they do.

This represents a single line haul on a very direct 286,000 lb. capacity route - no interchanges, no classification yards. It mimics ethanol moves which have been on-going for several years.

The Albany terminal is immediately adjacent to the Canadian Pacific Kenwood Yard; track and storage capacity are virtually unlimited and the unloading facilities are in place.

You could expect the dedication of 29,000 gallon cars to this move, so allowing for a 14 day turn would require, what, maybe 1,000 cars?

46 posted on 01/10/2013 9:30:06 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: Mr. Lucky
You could expect the dedication of 29,000 gallon cars to this move, so allowing for a 14 day turn would require, what, maybe 1,000 cars?

- - - -

Just a bit over 1,000 cars. I don't know what they would allow contingency, maintenance, etc. Probably not much, 2~4%???

- - - - -

I don't claim any knowledge on the rail shipping times. I have no experience to judge that. I was commenting on what the suggested shipping times equated to implementation.

Others have mentioned limitations of unloading capabilities. I have not done rail but I have done tanker truck operations. The equipment, load arms, metering, etc that was typically used maxed out at ~750 gpm with nearly half that being normal.

If a 29,000 Gal tank is unloaded at 600 gpm, it takes 50~55 minutes per tank to connect, unload and disconnect. Multiple unloading stations are typical in a rail operation, I've seen 5~6 before at refineries. It would take about 3 stations at an hour average to empty 50,000 bpd. So even if the facilities don't exist today (with capacity to handle this new traffic) it is not a big project to add that capability.

I don't mean to suggest this is a bad idea. It is not. It is delivering domestic crude to a crowded area that would be difficult to construct new pipelines. It isn't as cheap or a simple as a “typical” pipeline. But building a new pipeline from Illinois (where several pipelines bring oil) to Linden, NJ is not typical, easy or cheap.

47 posted on 01/10/2013 10:19:36 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The 52’ SeaRay may be to high off the waterline to make it under many of the bridges across NY state. The barge canal(formerly Erie Canal) was constructed to haul small barges with a 15’ beam or less using horses to pull them along the length of the canal.

However, I am sure there are many canal boats that could be rented with captains. Also, there are sections that connect the Finger Lakes south of Rochester and west of Syracuse where you would have access to Seneca and Cayuga Lakes where a 52’ SeaRay would be just the ticket.


48 posted on 01/10/2013 10:26:23 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: thackney

They may have a facility that could handle 100 cars, but it is had to believe they would have a siding with that much length to accomidate 100 cars at a time. It would need to be over a mile long(70’ x 100 cars = 7000 feet).

I am only speaking from my experience as a lumber broker that very few yards can handle a spot of more than 25 cars at a time. That is a lot of real estate.


49 posted on 01/10/2013 10:32:13 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: woodbutcher1963

Thanks for the info.

There is an existing multi-lane siding ~6,000 feet at a “small” tank farm on the south side of Albany, NY.

I doubt they are common, but they do exist.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=42.62781,-73.76509&spn=0.025955,0.042572&t=h&z=15


50 posted on 01/10/2013 11:29:47 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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