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1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed
Yahoo! News / The Associated Press ^ | Hope Yen

Posted on 04/22/2012 12:31:28 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

The college class of 2012 is in for a rude welcome to the world of work.

A weak labor market already has left half of young college graduates either jobless or underemployed in positions that don't fully use their skills and knowledge.

Young adults with bachelor's degrees are increasingly scraping by in lower-wage jobs — waiter or waitress, bartender, retail clerk or receptionist, for example — and that's confounding their hopes a degree would pay off despite higher tuition and mounting student loans....

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: college; economy; obama; unemployment
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Hey, college dudes and gals, how’s that Obama “hope & change” working out for you??? You idiots voted for Obama, and you are getting exactly what you so rightfully deserve, fools to the core. Love it!!!


51 posted on 04/22/2012 2:17:13 PM PDT by JLAGRAYFOX (My only objective is defeat and destroy Obama & his Democrat Party, political ly!!!)
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To: Black_Shark
Anecdotal examples can be extremely misleading.

A better set of anecdotal samples could be gathered by getting inside (meaning actually working inside, in any position) of one or more of the organizations in which you would like to work.

Then check out the individuals filling those upper-level positions that interest you. Then check out the listed requirements for the positions they have filled. Hint: There may be zero correlation between these two sets of data.

As the article at the top of the thread describes: ANY new college graduate getting ANY employment in their field, at ANY rate of pay, has finally won a 50/50 coin toss (perhaps after several, or several thousands of such coin tosses that came up tails).

52 posted on 04/22/2012 2:18:25 PM PDT by meadsjn (Sarah 2012, or sooner)
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To: Black_Shark
I hope you don't take this wrong, but have you looked for jobs out-of-state? Have you considered selling yourself as a SAS programmer, say, to an insurance company?

Cheers!

53 posted on 04/22/2012 2:37:26 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: central_va
Just curious -- is Eclipse free? -- and is it based on Windows or UNIX?

Cheers!

54 posted on 04/22/2012 2:41:44 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: Black_Shark

I want to enter as an entry-level data analyst. I expect a salary in the $40-50,000 range commiserate with my skills. I want the opportunity for advancement if I work hard and prove my worth. I want to be on the management/executive track by the time I’m 30.

How would I accomplish this? Through working my butt off for however many years it takes to prove my worth.

Yet no employer will even consider me for a job because I don’t have 2+ years of experience for a basic entry-level data analysis job.

Instead I get offered “sales” jobs where I can “make my own living and be my own boss”.

Life is hard but this is friggin ridiculous. Why did I go to college and work my BUTT off learning statistics and mathematics when I could have bypassed it all and still be qualified for the same jobs?
_________________________________

Are you joking?

twenty thousand or some no cost internships is where you start.

and you need to work for your grad degree.

I think you are expecting too much and need to take what you can get and get all the experience you can.


55 posted on 04/22/2012 2:42:21 PM PDT by Chickensoup (In the 20th century 200 million people were killed by their own governments.)
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To: Black_Shark

For a more concrete anecdotal example: a personal friend of mine is 27 and a VP of fixed income at a major bank. Another friend is currently well on his way to becoming VP by the time he’s 26.

__________________

Do you know anything about bank vps?

They are jokes. No money, just title.

We used to have a joke for them. He is the president of the left side of the bank..... fourth through tenth floors.

They were paid dog food.

Still are.


56 posted on 04/22/2012 2:45:29 PM PDT by Chickensoup (In the 20th century 200 million people were killed by their own governments.)
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To: Black_Shark

Move to Silicon Valley. There’s a hiring boom right now. “Big Data” is all the rage and they can’t find enough good people.


57 posted on 04/22/2012 2:46:17 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Black_Shark

I don’t think he’s the exception. Computer science grads have very little problem finding jobs. Period. We get dozens of calls every month from employers looking for kids to hire. Especially if you have .Net, web programming, or mobile application skills. If you have two years programming experience you need to play that up.

Its also possible that your resume is getting filtered out because you don’t have that BS in CS degree.


58 posted on 04/22/2012 2:52:13 PM PDT by rbg81
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To: shoff

I was a work/study, then a career counselor, trainer and a supervisor at two different states unemployment offices for around 15 years and I am unemployed. I have a bachelors degree in business administration and 10 point veteran’s preference.


59 posted on 04/22/2012 2:53:43 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Ich habe keinen Konig aber Gott)
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To: Black_Shark

Ruby, Node.js, Clojure, Java, Python, Scala. Learn Heroku, Hadoop. Look at whatever SalesForce.com is acquiring and go there. Look at web metrics — how are companies maximizing their web and marketing ROIs? Look at Model Metrics which was acquired by SFDC late last year. Look at Radian6 which was also acquired by SFDC last year.

Get the papers from “Solving big data analytics with an emerging data-centric language” conference held last month here in Santa Clara.

Frankly, it doesn’t sound like you get out enough. I’m 60 and and try to stay on top of this stuff, not so much from a practitioner perspective, but from a need to know when people are blowing smoke up my ass and when they are telling the truth.

Broaden your horizons on what it means to be a “data analyst,” too.


60 posted on 04/22/2012 2:55:10 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Black_Shark
http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Biostatistic-SAS-Programming-Job-Network-1429177

My son is a Linux DB programmer, and has grown to really like home based jobs.

Will he ever become a senior VP? He doesn't care. He is making $60k+ and increasing his skills, while finishing his Masters degree.

Your resume blows his away. So do like he did, and contract away until a medium sized company wants you bad enough to outbid others.

He is working toward his Masters of Divinity in Missouri. All of the jobs in his area all want MS experience, and he would rather not go to the Redmond side of the force.

Your situation differs but between NC and VA there has to be a position for you.

61 posted on 04/22/2012 2:56:06 PM PDT by texas booster (Join FreeRepublic's Folding@Home team (Team # 36120) Cure Alzheimer's!)
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To: central_va

If you use the Eclipse IDE, then use it to learn Apex, the Java-like web database programming language built into SalesForce. You can download a dev copy of SFDC for free and Eclipse is free, too.

There is a shortage of SFDC developers and, like central_va says, you’ll be in 6 figs in no time.


62 posted on 04/22/2012 2:59:28 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Black_Shark; central_va
(Central, courtesy *PING* to you as you are praised later on.)

Black_Shark, let me give you a piece of advice on the open thread.

As the disclaimer on an open-source piece of scientific software used to say, "Careful! Anything free comes with no guarantee."

1) I expect a salary in the $40-50,000 range commiserate with my skills.

This comes across as demanding. It's an employer's market. There are people (as you say) with 2-3 years experience willing to take that much. Unless you have a hook (you're dating the CEO's daughter) saying what YOU want isn't a good move. It makes you look grasping and likely to jump ship as soon as a marginally better salary comes along.

2) I want the opportunity for advancement if I work hard and prove my worth.

In a field which is full of companies nearly going belly-up (think of the shenanigans to keep the banks from foundering), your individual contribution is of no value. You are a *COST*. Get on board and SHOW what you can do, and they may like you: or your entire division may get axed to cover the rear of someone trying to enter the C-level suite.

3) I want to be on the management/executive track by the time I’m 30.

Have you stopped to consider how many unemployed MBAs there are right now?

And again, you may think that you are advertising yourself as "serious" but there are other, less flattering, messages which might be read into that statement.

4) Life is hard but this is friggin ridiculous. Why did I go to college and work my BUTT off learning statistics and mathematics when I could have bypassed it all and still be qualified for the same jobs?

Where did you go to school? What is your GPA? In what discipline?

It may or not be impressive, but if the big picture is that your field is under the gun, the odds are against you.

Consider your learning as intellectual kindling, find out what area is hot (and likely to remain so), and see how you can springboard from your area to that.

Central_va's advice is not just gold: it's platinum.

Programmers are a dime a dozen; but programmers who understand the business rules and reasons behind the programming, who can contribute in a meaningful way to design, are priceless. Your econ is a good start to that, if you want to go to the financial industry.

On the con side, if you really want to go to management, programmers are considered "outside the loop" for *real* business operations.

Full Disclosure: depending on the situation, management is not all it's cracked up to be. It is mostly political; the pressure never lets up; you are being gunned at by other managers eager to absorb your department AND by those beneath you; and you usually have to work late (9 or 10 pm) most every night just to keep up. It can play hell with a marriage.

Which is yet another reason I did NOT opt for management track immediately.

Cheers!

63 posted on 04/22/2012 3:00:24 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: muawiyah

We Are All Out of Work Coal Miners Now

Are you TAXED ENOUGH ALREADY,
Or still have your last dime?
Do you need to keep on giving
Until you are poor, weak and blind?

Do you feel good as the parasites
Destroy what you have built?
Does it warm your heart to witness
That the poor refuse to work?

Ah, the joy of working to go in debt
To DC’s Company Store,
And with each election the politicians say,
“We must tax you until YOU are also poor.”


64 posted on 04/22/2012 3:02:43 PM PDT by Graewoulf ((Dictator Baby-Doc Barack's obama"care" violates Sherman Anti-Trust Law, AND U.S. Constitution.))
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

10% - or less - of the 18-year old population has any business going anywhere near a college, unless it’s to sell sandwiches in the dorms late at night.

IT’S NOT THE DEGREE, STUPID - IT’S HOW HARD IT IS TO QUALIFY.

If you give a bachelor’s degree to my 3-year old Labrador Retriever, will she make more than a high school graduate?

The whole thing is so absurd, makes me wanna holler.


65 posted on 04/22/2012 3:04:28 PM PDT by Jim Noble ("The Germans: At your feet, or at your throat" - Winston Churchill)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Mine did, too. She is in Japan, beginning her second year of teaching English. She just wanted a job.


66 posted on 04/22/2012 3:08:28 PM PDT by LibertarianLiz
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To: Black_Shark

You’ll get your biggest salary bump when you quit your first job and move on to the next. Take the 30K or whatever is offered but keep gaining experience, meeting people and looking for better opportunities. Banks can hire and lay off like waves in the ocean, I used to work in the IT side of a major one. They also give out the title of AVP and VP all the time, and it doesn’t really mean much in the big institutions unless you’re planning on being a lifer. Like someone else posted programming skills like CSharp and Java are in demand but you might be more suited to Database Development/Analysis with database servers like SQL Server or Oracle.


67 posted on 04/22/2012 3:12:53 PM PDT by Darth Hillary
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To: Black_Shark
Why did I go to college and work my BUTT off learning statistics and mathematics when I could have bypassed it all and still be qualified for the same jobs?

I have no idea. You tell me.

68 posted on 04/22/2012 3:15:33 PM PDT by Jim Noble ("The Germans: At your feet, or at your throat" - Winston Churchill)
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To: Black_Shark
Why did I go to college and work my BUTT off learning statistics and mathematics when I could have bypassed it all and still be qualified for the same jobs?

I have no idea. You tell me.

69 posted on 04/22/2012 3:15:43 PM PDT by Jim Noble ("The Germans: At your feet, or at your throat" - Winston Churchill)
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To: Black_Shark

It’s not too late to switch to a degree in Philosophy.

It worked for me.


70 posted on 04/22/2012 3:16:25 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What? You mean you can’t come out with a degree in Wymyns Studies and get a high paying job? Time for another entitlement for all these poor kids!!


71 posted on 04/22/2012 3:16:58 PM PDT by Opinionated Blowhard ("When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.")
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To: grey_whiskers

I appreciate your advice however I am not “demanding” these conditions to employers. That is the last thing I would do in an interview. Instead, I listen to the employers and have a mental checklist. If the employer offers me a job paying $35K, then I expect opportunities for quick advancement in order to compensate for the lower starting salary. If I get offered $35K for a deadend job, I say “no but thank you” and move on to the next interview.

I know the unemployment rate for MBA’s and I’ve also seen their curriculum and I’m not surprised. That is why, if I chose the grad school route, I would get a Master’s in Applied Economics with Master’s Minor in Statistics along with as much math as I could cram in my head during that 2 year span. Math is king in this world.

In regards to the school, I went to North Carolina State University which has one of the top Statistics departments in the nation along with being the top math school in the state. As I said, a BS in Economics here requires Calc, Linear Algebra, Diff Eq, Econometrics, among other math requirements. I have more math than an engineering major is required to have but it’s applied to a different discipline. They do thermo/physics, I do economics. My overall GPA is 3.385 thanks to freshman/sophomore years and major GPA is 3.619 thanks to a C in intro to micro back when I was a poli-sci major. Otherwise it would be a ~3.9.

This economy sucks but there is a certain threshold to which a job is no longer viable. It’s not like I’m expecting that much. I expect a salary near the average for college graduates ($50K), opportunities within the company, and the ability to further improve my skillset. Unfortunately, this does not look likely in this economy and with the amount of cheap labor that is being supplied abroad so I don’t know what the future holds.


72 posted on 04/22/2012 3:19:01 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: Tijeras_Slim

Philosophy may be the hardest major. I took an intro to philosophy course and it blew my mind and my friend showed me his Logic textbook... my head hurts thinking about it.

Give me Math anyday!


73 posted on 04/22/2012 3:20:07 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: Opinionated Blowhard
You mean you can’t come out with a degree in Wymyns Studies and get a high paying job?

You can where the Democrat party wields power. Obama will hire them and make us pay for it.

74 posted on 04/22/2012 3:21:53 PM PDT by af_vet_1981 (The bus came by and I got on, That's when it all began,)
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To: Darth Hillary

That may be my only option. I am currently debating between doing that or going to grad school ($30-35K for 2 years with room, board, tuition, etc). If nothing else gets offered, than my choice will come down to those two options and I don;t know what I’ll do.


75 posted on 04/22/2012 3:22:28 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: Black_Shark

I thought it was pretty easy, loads of BS’ing and drinking. Wouldn’t recommend it as a career though.


76 posted on 04/22/2012 3:24:09 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: grey_whiskers; central_va; Black_Shark
Just curious -- is Eclipse free? -- and is it based on Windows or UNIX?

Murach's book "Java Programming 4th Edition" is what our crew is using. Murach's lessons are geared toward NetBeans, but are usable on Eclipse with a little more hassle. Most of us installed both IDEs. Some of us already have multiple versions of WAMP or LAMP installed.

Eclipse and NetBeans are both free downloads for both Windows and Mac, as is the JDK 1.7 (Java Development Kit), and Apache Derby 10.8 or later for a web server. MySql is used for the database parts of the book, and is also a free download.

The book lists for $52.50, but is about $40 on Amazon.

77 posted on 04/22/2012 3:31:31 PM PDT by meadsjn (Sarah 2012, or sooner)
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To: grey_whiskers

I guess my point is that it is depressing giving up 4 years of my life only to discover that I am no more valuable coming out than I was coming in.

Very frustrating.


78 posted on 04/22/2012 3:31:34 PM PDT by Black_Shark
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To: grey_whiskers
Just curious -- is Eclipse free? -- and is it based on Windows or UNIX? Cheers!

Eclipse is free, almost all IDE's are free. NetBeans is a good one too. Here is the eclipse Download: Link here.

79 posted on 04/22/2012 3:34:04 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Black_Shark

Get a degree in finance. That will help


80 posted on 04/22/2012 3:38:37 PM PDT by yldstrk ( My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: FlingWingFlyer
In today’s “labor market”, a college diploma doesn’t mean much. Everybody has one. Employers are looking for people who are willing to work. IMHO.

Tell that to the newly minted petroleum engineering graduates who are pulling down $100k per year.

81 posted on 04/22/2012 3:48:00 PM PDT by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

Not if your degree is in EE/CS, which most Americans don’t pursue....


82 posted on 04/22/2012 3:48:20 PM PDT by nwrep
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To: Tijeras_Slim

LOL. My husband majored in Philosophy too. When we married he eventually tired of working in the mill and went to law school, which vastly improved his earning potential.

There’s a saying in law school, “What was your first choice?”


83 posted on 04/22/2012 3:51:17 PM PDT by keats5 (Not all of us are hypnotized.)
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To: grey_whiskers; central_va; Black_Shark
Here's some more important info:

"Our crew" is a bunch of old mainframe programmer/analysts, highest level (title-wise) in a large regional bancorp (14,000 employees).

Most of the long-term mainframers poo-pooed the need to learn other platforms, languages, concepts, principles, etc., until the company got deeper into negotiations with Infosys to outsource our core systems to India with a Java replacement.

Only people over or close to 65 can afford to plan on retiring with "only" mainframe skills, and people that retire are coming back to work as contractors within weeks (if they can).

84 posted on 04/22/2012 3:55:34 PM PDT by meadsjn (Sarah 2012, or sooner)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
No problem because Obama Announces New Push to Train The Unemployed ;-)
85 posted on 04/22/2012 4:02:09 PM PDT by Brown Deer (Pray for 0bama. Psalm 109:8)
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To: Black_Shark

“I want to enter as an entry-level data analyst. I expect a salary in the $40-50,000 range commiserate with my skills. I want the opportunity for advancement if I work hard and prove my worth.”
***********************************************************
It sounds as though you’re a senior already. Many of the recent graduates I’ve seen “get their foot in the door” in recent years did so by well placed (summer & holidays) internships. They had the opportunities to prove their worth and were picked up, as “known quantities”, upon graduation.

If you’re past the internship stage, then you might try getting on as a “temporary” in your line of work (even if it’s entry level work)—anything to be in a position to prove your worth.

By the way, welcome to the world of work and hustling. Nobody is getting anything handed to them in today’s economy (except perhaps for a handful of minority affirmative action folks). Wish you the best. Just don’t give up.


86 posted on 04/22/2012 4:04:32 PM PDT by House Atreides
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Employers are also concerned about how a graduate financed their education, they won’t be very impressed with somebody with good grades, who just financed their education from student loans and the Bank of Mom and Dad.


87 posted on 04/22/2012 4:06:11 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

>In today’s “labor market”, a college diploma doesn’t mean much. Everybody has one.

No kidding. I’ve been looking for programming jobs (I have a Bachelor’s in Computer Science) and during a couple of interviews I’ve been asked questions like “what is the general structure of an if-statement.” IMO, this is pretty insulting to anyone who has put in the work to get a 4-year degree in the field.

I’m told that’s because there are applying people who don’t know — which is surprising in itself with the posted requirements of the job.
If I were “in charge” of the hiring of the candidate, I’d make sure there was a “training reimbursement clause” (and another guaranteeing the legitimacy of the diploma). Then, in the case of fraud/misrepresentation such that an employee who didn’t know such a thing (as the if-statement) the company would fire and sue the candidate (fraud) and sue the issuing-school as well (further fraud).

Yes, more work for lawyers; but in the end degrees would QUICKLY come to have some value. (Consider how schools would react to being sued for incompetence on part of their graduates.)

>Employers are looking for people who are willing to work. IMHO.

This is true; but there seems to be a sort of lemming effect in my field. The sort of thing that allows PHP to be used in commercial projects*** because a) everyone else does it, and b) it’s “quicker”* and “easier”**.

So, I’m not sure it boils down to just being willing to work. (Unless that willingness to work includes the sacrifice of a commitment to providing an excellent product.)


* It’s ‘quicker’ because it allows a coder to go in and start making immediately visible changes.
** It’s ‘easier’ because cause it does a lot of “magic” type-casting and the like; a bad thing, I think, because it discourages thinking about the actual problem at hand.
*** This leads to why it’s a bad idea in a commercial product: there are a lot of hidden ‘gotchas’ which turn the production from problem-solving to correcting for the language. For example, let’s say you want to do something with the cent portion of a payment; the string ‘08’ is converted into the number 0; because the magic-typecast errors out (it thinks that an integer starting w/ zero is in octal; meaning digits of 0..7) and returns a 0 (indicating an error). The whole language is like that.


88 posted on 04/22/2012 4:10:14 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: muawiyah

>There’s a good 15% of the electorate who would not vote for a Democrat for anything. Now it’s time for Republicans to figure out how to get those guys to vote FOR a Republican.

The problem with this is that the Republican party is unconcerned with holding to it’s stated party-planks.

When was the last time that the Republican party effected a major cut-down on government-size? (I’m talking multiple agencies shut down.)
When was the last time they effected a balanced budget?
When was the last time they actually pushed FOR a repeal/repudiation of Roe v. Wade? (They had control of the legislative and executive for most of Bush2.)
When was the last time they actually stood against gun-control? (They get false-praise for the 90s AWB; they had to do NOTHING for the sunset-clause to kick in.)
When was the last time they stood for REAL Constitutionalism? (If they did there would be problems with: the Fed-reserve, the GCA/NFA, the War on Drugs, etc)

In short, the Republican party seems dead-set in be[com]ing utterly irrelevant.


89 posted on 04/22/2012 4:19:58 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: SVTCobra03
Yup! A degree in petroleum engineering is a long ways from one in Pissed Off Women Studies.
90 posted on 04/22/2012 4:21:55 PM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (It's time for the 47% to start paying their "fair share" of income taxes.)
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To: Black_Shark

The diploma is just a start. It’s really all about who you know.

Let’s face it. Most employers have a stack of applications. They hire people they know, and almost all have connections with people in their own network looking for work. The only reason they would resort to an unknown entity would be desperation.

Employers tend to hire people they’ve already worked with from their families, church, charities, political organizations or through internships.

My son hasn’t even graduated yet, and he was offered two full time jobs. The pay is OK. He’ll be able to afford his own place and will be able to support himself. He’s in children’s ministry. One job offer came from his home church, where he has volunteered for years. The other through an internship.

My first professional jobs came through connections with a family member and with a classmate who ended up in administration. My husband was hired out of his internship. My other son was hired because of a connection with a friend. My adopted Asian high school daughter was hired on the spot the moment she walked into an Asian restaurant. My grandmother loved to surprise her elderly neighbor with freshly baked bread. This neighbor’s son eventually hired my grandmother.

This is nothing new. True, our society has become more credentialed. But it’s still all about who you know.


91 posted on 04/22/2012 4:22:23 PM PDT by keats5 (Not all of us are hypnotized.)
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To: jcsjcm

Nice.

I’ve got a CS degree myself but am having a bit less success in my job-search... though that may be because I’m looking more for a particular sort of programming job (using Ada) which jobs seems to want only ‘experienced’ people w/ security clearances. {I know I’d pass a clearance, but I’ve had very little in the way of formal-training w/ Ada; most of it is self-taught after a ‘programing languages’ course.} Maybe the problem is, so to speak, that ladder has no bottom rungs.


92 posted on 04/22/2012 4:31:51 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark
I’ve been asked questions like “what is the general structure of an if-statement.”

I have a degree in EE and was asked what is Ohm's Law? I got up and left, I was totally rude but I was pissed off. I just stormed out of the place without saying a word. For all I know the dufus thought I was a fraud and knew nothing about EE. But clearly my resume said BSEE on it so it is all retarded in the end....

For Freepers who can't understand this it would be like interviewing a Physician an asking him/her "So do you know what blood is?"

93 posted on 04/22/2012 4:39:22 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Black_Shark

>I forgot to add that I am interested in ALL Data Analysis, not just investment/banking analysis. I love stats.

Stats are kinda-interesting, even though I had to take the course 3 times to pass. (Had motivation issues.)
What I found odd was that I could explain what the teacher was talking about to those who just-didn’t-get-it in such a manner that they got it... even though I was/am certain my level of understanding was tenuous at best.


94 posted on 04/22/2012 4:50:39 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

,,,,and it’s no wonder ,, have you ever heard of some of the wierd degrees these young fools are being awarded .


95 posted on 04/22/2012 4:57:43 PM PDT by Lionheartusa1 (-: Socialism is the equal distribution of misery :-)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
...Longer-term government projections also may fail to consider "degree inflation," a growing ubiquity of bachelor's degrees...

Oddly enough, this point was not accented, and it is important. There is a large oversupply of college graduates today.

When I got my bachelor's degree in 1966, receiving a degree was somewhat prestigious since only 6.5 percent of the U.S. population held one. Today, it's 30.4 percent, which is quite a jump. (To understand why, look up the Supreme Court 1971 decision Griggs v. Duke Power and consider its implications from the viewpoint of employers.)

In 1966 I walked right from graduation into the job of my choice and that was not unusual. Quite a difference an oversupply of college graduates can make.

96 posted on 04/22/2012 5:05:23 PM PDT by OldPossum
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To: Lionheartusa1
Womyn’s studies? Puppetry arts? Rural Sociology?
97 posted on 04/22/2012 5:06:51 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Ich habe keinen Konig aber Gott)
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To: miss marmelstein

>You’re being satirical, right? You couldn’t possibly be serious, could you???

Probably not; I’ve got a BS in Computer Science and am looking for a job, the couple of phone interviews I’ve done have posed questions like “what is the general form of an if-statement?”... this is the equivalent of asking a registered-nurse what a “heart-rate”/”pulse” is in an interview.


98 posted on 04/22/2012 5:10:06 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: ex-snook
Manufacturing jobs as well as information-flow type jobs have been disappearing under the gun of mechanization, automation, computerization, improved methods and robotics.

I've worked in factories at jobs involving hard labor ~ and it was no fun. Other than having employment and the income that came with it I was glad to see those jobs disappear ~ and they didn't go to Mexico or China.

BTW, China has this same problem with modern manufacturing capability ~ it employs a lot fewer people than meets the need for jobs. But, fur shur, they are not giving up any of the new methods .

99 posted on 04/22/2012 5:22:22 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Black_Shark
Times change ~ I started as a math major but when I graduated I had well over 280 different job offers.

You probably won't see anything like that for the rest of history.

Saved all the firm job offers just to prove to the kids I was a contender some day.

100 posted on 04/22/2012 5:32:21 PM PDT by muawiyah
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