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Popular Drugs for Dementia Tied to Deaths
NY Times ^ | April 12, 2005 | GARDINER HARRIS

Posted on 04/12/2005 12:24:01 PM PDT by neverdem

WASHINGTON, April 11 - Older patients with dementia who are given antipsychotic medicines are far more likely to die prematurely than those given dummy pills, federal drug regulators said Monday. The warning adds to growing worries about the safety of the widely prescribed drugs.

The Food and Drug Administration said that it would now require manufacturers of the medicines to place black-box warnings - the agency's most severe - on the labels of all the drugs. In 2003, the agency required manufacturers to add a warning about an increased risk of diabetes from antipsychotic medications.

Zyprexa and Symbyax from Eli Lilly, Risperdal from Johnson & Johnson, Seroquel from AstraZeneca, Abilify from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Clozaril from Novartis and Geodon from Pfizer are all affected by the warning.

The drugs belong to a class of medicines developed since 1989 that are supposed to be safer than the older class of medicines for psychosis, like Haldol. In high doses, Haldol and drugs like it can cause a debilitating condition called tardive dyskinesia, a lifelong affliction that can involve uncontrollable trembling, tics and jerky movements.

Doctors have become so comfortable with the safety of the newer medicines that they are now among the biggest selling in the world, with some physicians using them to treat a wide range of conditions, including schizophrenia, depression and dementia in the elderly. Indeed, some psychiatrists prescribe cocktails of antipsychotics to patients with persistent mental problems.

Zyprexa is the biggest drug expense for many state Medicaid programs, the health insurance for the poor.

But the safety of the pills has come under increasing scrutiny. Studies now suggest that the newer drugs are only slightly less likely to cause tardive dyskinesia, and worries about other side effects are mounting.

The Food and Drug Administration said that it had analyzed the results of 17 placebo-controlled trials involving the drugs, which are known as atypical antipsychotics. The agency found that elderly patients with dementia who were given the pills were 1.6 to 1.7 times as likely to die as those given placebos.

The causes of death varied, although most died of heart-related problems like heart failure or infections like pneumonia, the drug agency said.

Representatives for Eli Lilly, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson said the companies were reviewing the F.D.A.'s requirement and would work with the agency to develop new warnings.

The representatives from Eli Lilly and Johnson & Johnson noted that the companies put warnings on their labels about an increased risk of stroke more than a year ago.

The drug agency said it was considering adding the new warning to the older class of medicines "because limited data also suggest a similar increase in mortality for these drugs."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; US: District of Columbia; US: Maryland
KEYWORDS: dementia; drugs; health; mentaldisorders; mentalhealth; pharmaceuticals

1 posted on 04/12/2005 12:24:06 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: El Gato; JudyB1938; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Robert A. Cook, PE; lepton; LadyDoc; jb6; tiamat; PGalt; ..

FReepmail me if you want on or off my health and science ping list.


2 posted on 04/12/2005 12:25:32 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem

Giving people with dementia "dummy pills". Placebo is a much kinder work under these circumstances.


3 posted on 04/12/2005 12:26:48 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter
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To: neverdem
Now we know why they are so POPULAR......
4 posted on 04/12/2005 12:32:57 PM PDT by Red Badger (Entrepreneurs find a need and fill it. Politicians create a need and fill it........)
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To: gov_bean_ counter
"dummy pills".

I know several folks whom I suspect of taking those.

5 posted on 04/12/2005 12:34:15 PM PDT by flying Elvis
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To: Red Badger

Even more euphoric than starving?


6 posted on 04/12/2005 12:35:58 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter
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To: neverdem

Of all of these, in my experience Clozaril is the most dangerous and individuals on it need to be monitored continuously as there is potential for fatal blood abnormalities, blood pressure problems, heart muscle problems and bowel obstructions.


7 posted on 04/12/2005 12:39:57 PM PDT by tertiary01 (How many highly paid "professionals" did it take to kill a powerless disabled dependent woman?)
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To: neverdem

Seems a lot of prescription drugs on the market can cause more harm than good. If at all possible, I try not to take any prescriptions. And I've lost all faith in the FDA.


8 posted on 04/12/2005 12:43:25 PM PDT by mlc9852
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To: mlc9852

They release a new drug, everyone gets it, then it's taken off the market cause it's dangerous.

The public IS the study.


9 posted on 04/12/2005 12:49:49 PM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: neverdem
The Food and Drug Administration said that it had analyzed the results of 17 placebo-controlled trials involving the drugs, which are known as atypical antipsychotics. The agency found that elderly patients with dementia who were given the pills were 1.6 to 1.7 times as likely to die as those given placebos.

Lst time I checked, the mortality rate for all of us is 100%.

10 posted on 04/12/2005 12:57:27 PM PDT by JusPasenThru (http://giinthesky.blogspot.com/)
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To: neverdem

Somewhat related through symptoms. Anyone had experience with Apomorphine in Parkinson's patients?


11 posted on 04/12/2005 1:02:28 PM PDT by IamConservative (To worry is to misuse your imagination.)
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To: neverdem

My dad passed away this past Friday. He suffered from dymentia for a few years. I recognize some of the drugs listed in the article as those that he took. For such a complex problem as mental illness, who knows whether some of the drugs do harm or good. Fifty years ago, what options did people have. You just play with the cards your dealt.

P.S. MSgt. Hugg will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery in May.


12 posted on 04/12/2005 1:12:23 PM PDT by phugg
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To: phugg

You have my condolences regarding your father passing away. Why is the burial delayed for so long?


13 posted on 04/12/2005 1:15:13 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem

I saw my elderly aunt before she took the anti psychotic medicine and she would have been down right dangerous if she had weighed more than 90 pounds.

She would have as soon slapped the $hit out of you as look at you.


14 posted on 04/12/2005 1:19:25 PM PDT by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for Spec.4 Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: phugg

My condolences to you and your family.


15 posted on 04/12/2005 1:22:38 PM PDT by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for Spec.4 Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: flying Elvis
"dummy pills".

I know several folks whom I suspect of taking those.

LOL!!! "Extra-Strenght",right?

16 posted on 04/12/2005 2:09:20 PM PDT by yankeedame ("Born with the gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad.")
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To: phugg
A Master Sargeant! That was quite a career, I'll bet.

I never served, but I have learned what a big accomplishment it is to reach like Master Sargeant or Chief Petty Officer.

17 posted on 04/12/2005 2:47:23 PM PDT by Montfort (The Democrat Party -- The Party of Death)
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To: Beowulf9

OTOH its very good news for insurance companies that don't want to pay for these drugs.


18 posted on 04/12/2005 2:59:33 PM PDT by virgil
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To: neverdem
The agency found that elderly patients with dementia who were given the pills were 1.6 to 1.7 times as likely to die as those given placebos.

If the drugs have the desired affect, that of reversing or arresting dementia, then I'd think most folks would gladly accept the increased risk. Most dementia sufferers know what is happening to them, at least in the early stages. It's pretty darn miserable.

OTOH, they only work for some people, and even then sometimes only for a relatively short period.

My Dad had dementia, and died of pneumonia. The drugs they gave him helped at first. I don't know if any of the one's mentioned were what he was taking. I don't live nearby and my Mom and brother never seemed to be able to recall what the drugs he was taking were. Thankfully he only "lived" in the nursing home for three weeks, a miserable three weeks, but only three, before the pneumonia released him from his suffering.

19 posted on 04/12/2005 3:20:42 PM PDT by El Gato (Activist Judges can twist the Constitution into anything they want ... or so they think.)
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To: gov_bean_ counter

YOU try caring for an angry psychotic person with Alzheimer's disease.

The reason that these drugs are used is because you need to use something...

If you use the older drugs, like Haldol, you end up with people stiff from the parkinson's like side effects.

If you use the even older drugs, like Mellaril, you end up with low blood pressure and people becomeing zombies.

If you use Valium, you end up with zombies with decreased respiration.

If you use nothing, you end up with a person in a nursing home in physical restraints.

Whenever I read these studies, I don't quite believe them. There are too many issues: for example, how many dropped out because of severe behavior problems?

Like ALL drugs, what you need to do is use them only if needed. If Zyprexa means that you can care for grannie who is forgetful but her ordinary sweet self, versus angry, confused grannie who is so bad you lose your health trying to care for her and she ends up in a nursing home...well, maybe it's worth it.


20 posted on 04/12/2005 3:47:48 PM PDT by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
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To: El Gato

These atypical antipsychotics are prescribed for demented patients who are usually very agitated.


21 posted on 04/12/2005 3:49:14 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: tertiary01

After working with all of them, I frankly think Haldol and Thorazine are better drugs...and they are no picnics.


22 posted on 04/12/2005 3:50:50 PM PDT by mlmr (The Culture of Death will get a lot more deadly before it's done.)
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To: mlmr

It seems like when everything else has been tried and failed they end up going back on Haldol.


23 posted on 04/12/2005 7:17:12 PM PDT by tertiary01 (How many highly paid "professionals" did it take to kill a powerless disabled dependent woman?)
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To: LadyDoc
I agree. If these drugs are truly needed, the trade-off is worth it. I suspect, though, that they are over-prescribed.

My mother, who has mild dementia, was put on Respirdal while in the hospital for pneumonia. The doctors wanted her to stay on it. We took her off it, and she is doing better than when she took it.

24 posted on 04/12/2005 8:19:06 PM PDT by SupplySider
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To: LadyDoc

All true. Also, with regard the high cost of a drug like Zyprexa, what is not mentioned here is the cost of not treating someone with schizophrenia. The cost of having someone coming into an ER with full blown psychosis 5 or 6 times a year may be a lot more expensive than having them stay compliant with the meds. Not to mention the cost (emotionally and financially) to the family.


25 posted on 04/12/2005 8:42:13 PM PDT by brewer1516
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To: tertiary01

I wouldn't give Zyprexa to my own, or Geodon...


26 posted on 04/13/2005 4:04:33 AM PDT by mlmr (The Culture of Death will get a lot more deadly before it's done.)
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To: LadyDoc

You bring up good points. But they are difficult drugs at best with significant tradeoffs.


27 posted on 04/13/2005 4:07:29 AM PDT by mlmr (The Culture of Death will get a lot more deadly before it's done.)
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