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Cult leader's molestation trial could create circus
AP ^ | MARK NIESSE

Posted on 01/04/2004 5:02:43 PM PST by EggsAckley

EATONTON, GA (AP) -- After months of unorthodox tactics and protests by followers dressed as Egyptian pharaohs, mummies and birds, Nuwaubian cult leader Malachi York's child molestation case finally heads to trial Monday. And officials are doing all they can to keep the courtroom from turning into a circus.

"It's like living in bizarro world," said Frank Ford, an attorney who has argued with the Nuwaubians in court. "They cannot stand being told no, and they cannot stand being ignored."

York, who moved the quasi-religious United Nuwaubian Nation of Moors from New York to a central Georgia farm in 1993, faces 13 federal counts of molestation and racketeering. A plea bargain nearly a year ago was rejected by a judge who felt the proposed 15-year prison sentence was too lenient.

The trial, which was moved 225 miles from Macon to Brunswick because of pretrial publicity, could be dogged by Nuwaubian supporters dressed in American Indian garb. Hundreds of protesters have turned out to many of York's court hearings, sometimes beating drums or handing out anti-government literature.

York, aka "Chief Black Thunderbird Eagle," has unsuccessfully argued he has American Indian heritage and shouldn't be judged by the U.S. court system. In previous hearings, he's responded to a judge's questions with answers based in "common law," such as "I accept this for value."

"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials.

One time, York refused to stand when U.S. District Judge Ashley Royal entered the courtroom. Two U.S. marshals pulled him to his feet and held him until Royal told the courtroom to be seated.

"You have this mocking of the court system," said Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills. "These victims have been jerked around and ... it doesn't give the public a lot of confidence."

Hoping to head off potential disruptions, Royal this past week ruled that York's supporters won't be allowed to demonstrate outside the courthouse during the trial, which could last up to three weeks.

York's attorney, Adrian Patrick, said he didn't expect protesters to cause any problems, but he couldn't promise York wouldn't resort to unorthodox legal tactics.

"I can't say definitively what will and what won't come up," Patrick said. "It will ultimately be up to the defendant."

Prosecutors have said they plan to make a case that York used his status as a religious leader for sex and money, enriching himself, marrying several women and abusing young girls who were part of his sect.

District Attorney Fred Bright, who is heading the planned state prosecution to follow, has accused York of having sexual contact with as many as 13 girls and boys, including instances of sexual intercourse.

York, 58, has maintained he's being unfairly prosecuted because of a vendetta by small-town authorities who dislike the mostly black members of his cult for their unusual practices and a neo-Egyptian compound that includes pyramid-like structures complete with hieroglyphics.

The Nuwaubians, who once claimed 5,000 members but now are down to a few hundred, have actually gone through several transformations since moving to their 476-acre compound. They've dressed as cowboys and American Indians, claimed to be Muslim and Jewish, and York has said he's an extraterrestrial from the planet "Rizq."

At a Christmas parade in Brunswick, the Nuwaubians said they were a Mason's group as they handed out literature and asked spectators about the guilt or innocence of York. Their delegation in the parade included depictions of the Egyptian pharaoh Rameses, participants wearing bird and cow masks, and a group of mummies carrying parasols.

York spent three years in a New York prison in the 1960s for assault, resisting arrest and possession of a dangerous weapon. He joined the Black Panther Party and in 1967 formed a black nationalist group in New York.

He founded the Nuwaubian community after moving from New York under pressure from an FBI probe and amidst hostility between his group and other black Muslim organizations.

"I hope they put him away forever, and you know what? I wish somewhere his followers' minds could be cleansed to the point to see what he really is," said Georgia Smith, an Eatonton resident who has opposed the Nuwaubians. "I just hope after the trial, it's over with."


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Unclassified; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: abuseoflegalsystem; apbias; blackpanther; childmolestationcase; convictedfelon; cultivatinghate; cults; felon; freaks; howardsills; paroledconvict; racistreporter; slantedreport; slickjournalism; taxpayersmoney; villagepeople; whataboutthevictims; wheresjohnnycochran

1 posted on 01/04/2004 5:02:43 PM PST by EggsAckley
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To: EggsAckley
"They cannot stand being told no, and they cannot stand being ignored."

Hmm, they sound like Demoncrats.

2 posted on 01/04/2004 5:06:57 PM PST by EggsAckley
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To: All
Rank Location Receipts Donors/Avg Freepers/Avg Monthlies
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Thanks for donating to Free Republic!

Move your locale up the leaderboard!

3 posted on 01/04/2004 5:07:44 PM PST by Support Free Republic (Freepers post from sun to sun, but a fundraiser bot's work is never done.)
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To: EggsAckley
"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups

Dear Lord, where in the hell does AP find its reporters?

4 posted on 01/04/2004 5:12:26 PM PST by AdamSelene235 (I always shoot for the moon......sometimes I hit London.- Von Braun)
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To: EggsAckley
Ok, Class, find the two sentences that do not agree.

York spent three years in a New York prison in the 1960s for assault, resisting arrest and possession of a dangerous weapon. He joined the Black Panther Party and in 1967 formed a black nationalist group in New York.

"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials.

5 posted on 01/04/2004 5:15:25 PM PST by AdamSelene235 (I always shoot for the moon......sometimes I hit London.- Von Braun)
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To: EggsAckley
Sounds like ole "Doc" Karenga, inventor of Kwanzaa, complete with the felony convictions and lunacy.
6 posted on 01/04/2004 5:18:29 PM PST by IronJack
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To: EggsAckley
This reporter *IS* a bit prejudiced - obviously.

Where in this article did it detail anything about the charges? It did mention a lot of misc garbage based on "feelings" rather than anything on fact.

Any one of the many personal comments were enough to make me not want to read this article.

I also love how the reporter slid in a jab to Americans who still believe in the Constitution as it was written with his leftist radical parroting of:
"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials."

The reporter is slug, and the news agency that published this story is no better than a Public junior high school newspaper.
7 posted on 01/04/2004 5:18:56 PM PST by steplock (www.FOCUS.GOHOTSPRINGS.com)
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To: AdamSelene235
Geez, give the reporter a break. Here's a story about an ex-black panther living in a "compound" and molesting children.

Imagine the reporter's cognitive dissonance. He just had to get "white supremacist group" in there somewhere or go mad.
8 posted on 01/04/2004 5:20:22 PM PST by D-fendr
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To: AdamSelene235
Dear Lord, where in the hell does AP find its reporters?

At the campuses of many major universities and public schools across the nation.

9 posted on 01/04/2004 5:42:10 PM PST by garbanzo (Free people will set the course of history)
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To: EggsAckley
Im confused, Is he suppose to be Native American or African American?
10 posted on 01/04/2004 5:43:37 PM PST by libhater
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To: EggsAckley
I find myself more and more having to click on the original articles just to see if the one on FR is a hoax. I really didn't believe this was an approved AP article.
11 posted on 01/04/2004 5:44:48 PM PST by gitmo (Who is John Galt?)
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To: gitmo
I'm with you. Some of these stories just scream out "fake."
12 posted on 01/04/2004 5:48:14 PM PST by EggsAckley
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To: EggsAckley
Alas, it's still true.
13 posted on 01/04/2004 5:56:48 PM PST by Ronly Bonly Jones (the more things change...)
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To: EggsAckley

Malachai York, Numaubian Leader


Dwight York, Imperial Grand Potentate

Why on earth do people FOLLOW these nutcases? It's always about $, sex, & control... and TITLES!

14 posted on 01/04/2004 5:56:55 PM PST by Libertina (If it moves, tax it. If it doesn't move it's a sitting duck - tax it TWICE!)
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To: EggsAckley
"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials.

ARRRRRGGGGHHHHH!!! The only thing more sickening than this propagandized mis-statement is the fact that there are so many sheeple that will believe it.

I bet that reporter has gold fringe on his flag...

15 posted on 01/04/2004 6:08:04 PM PST by thatdewd
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To: libhater
Im confused, Is he suppose to be Native American or African American?

He's both, plus this: They've dressed as cowboys and American Indians, claimed to be Muslim and Jewish, and York has said he's an extraterrestrial from the planet "Rizq."

He's all things to all people. He may also be nuts.

16 posted on 01/04/2004 6:08:52 PM PST by DumpsterDiver
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To: gitmo; EggsAckley; All
In 2,000 Mark Niesse won an award from the Society of Professional Journalists "Mark of Excellence Awards honoring the best in student journalism."

"In-Depth Reporting 1st Place — Mark Niesse, University of Georgia"

Society of Professional Journalists

While employed by AP Mark Niesse has been published over paid: "The California Advocate," Seattle Times "Twelve states explore ways to buy Canadian drugs and not break U.S. law" and many more publications:

Search "Mark Niesse"

Sigh.

(Note to self: stop shilling for bad writers and get to work. /end of self recrimination)

17 posted on 01/04/2004 6:13:59 PM PST by bd476 (And the moral of the story: Sometimes it's best not to speculate.)
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To: DumpsterDiver
He's all things to all people. He may also be nuts.

------------------------------

He's a professional irritant abd provocateur. When he started believing his one crap, he entered the world of psychosis.

18 posted on 01/04/2004 6:16:47 PM PST by RLK
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To: EggsAckley
"Common law" is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials.

...and our nation was founded on a notion of progressive taxation.

19 posted on 01/04/2004 6:24:01 PM PST by Yeti
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To: D-fendr
== =Imagine the reporter's cognitive dissonance. He just had to get "white supremacist group" in there somewhere or go mad.

Plausible enough. =)

(Trust all is well with you and yours.)
20 posted on 01/04/2004 6:49:35 PM PST by Askel5
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To: EggsAckley
"It's like living in bizarro world," said Frank Ford, an attorney who has argued with the Nuwaubians in court. "They cannot stand being told no, and they cannot stand being ignored."

Sounds like they need to be spanked and sent to the corner.

OTOH, where was Janet Reno when this was going on?

21 posted on 01/04/2004 7:08:13 PM PST by TheSpottedOwl (Happy Iraqi Independence Day!!!!)
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To: Askel5
(Trust all is well with you and yours.)

Medium well. Thanks very much for Askeling.

{^_^}

22 posted on 01/04/2004 11:02:49 PM PST by D-fendr
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To: EggsAckley; All
Here ya go:

An Unofficial Nuwaubian Nation Of Moors Site

23 posted on 01/04/2004 11:26:20 PM PST by Mortimer Snavely (Comitas, Firmitas, Gravitas, Humanitas, Industria)
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To: EggsAckley; All
Interesting update:

The oddly worded news piece above was troubling. Thus began my search for different "takes" on the story. I found a few, then after updating the search engine again, lo and behold, same journalist, same basic article with one rather interesting edit to the original story posted above via AP.

This newer version was posted today, January 5, 2003 on The Macon Telegraph's website, Macon Georgia.

Posted on Mon, Jan. 05, 2004

York trial could become circus as proceedings get under way today

By Mark Niesse Associated Press

EATONTON - After months of common-law tactics and protests by followers dressed as Egyptian pharaohs, mummies and birds, Nuwaubian cult leader Malachi York's child molestation case finally heads to trial today.

And officials are doing all they can to keep the courtroom from turning into a circus.

"It's like living in 'Bizarro World,' " said Frank Ford, an attorney who has argued with the Nuwaubians in court. "They cannot stand being told no, and they cannot stand being ignored."

York, who moved the quasi-religious United Nuwaubian Nation of Moors from New York to a Putnam County farm in 1993, faces 13 federal counts of molestation and racketeering. A plea bargain nearly a year ago was rejected by a judge who felt the proposed 15-year prison sentence was too lenient.

The trial, which was moved 225 miles from Macon to Brunswick because of pretrial publicity, could be dogged by Nuwaubian supporters dressed in American Indian garb. Hundreds of protesters have turned out to many of York's court hearings, sometimes beating drums or handing out anti-government literature.

York, aka "Chief Black Thunderbird Eagle," has unsuccessfully argued he has American Indian heritage and shouldn't be judged by the U.S. court system.

In previous hearings, he's responded to a judge's questions with answers based in common law, such as "I accept this for value."

Whoops! What happpened to the following as written by the same journalist, same story, earlier date, and posted above? Could it be that Mark Niesse is a lurker here on FR? Or maybe his editor at AP finally noticed the bizarre slant:

" 'Common law' is the name given to an anti-government legal system that has been employed since the 1970s by white supremacist groups and others to harass the courts and other government officials..." ??

One time, York refused to stand when U.S. District Judge Ashley Royal entered the courtroom. Two U.S. marshals pulled him to his feet and held him until Royal told the courtroom to be seated.

"You have this mocking of the court system," said Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills. "These victims have been jerked around, and ... it doesn't give the public a lot of confidence."

Hoping to head off potential disruptions, Royal last week ruled that York's supporters won't be allowed to demonstrate outside the courthouse during the trial, which could last up to three weeks.

Royal also ordered the courtroom closed to the public, except for credentialed members of the media. The proceedings will be broadcast on closed-circuit television on another floor of the courthouse.

York's attorney, Adrian Patrick, said he didn't expect protesters to cause any problems, but he couldn't promise York wouldn't resort to unorthodox legal tactics.

"I can't say definitively what will and what won't come up," Patrick said. "It will ultimately be up to the defendant."

Prosecutors have said they plan to make a case that York used his status as a religious leader for sex and money, enriching himself, marrying several women and abusing young girls who were part of his sect.

District Attorney Fred Bright, who is heading a planned state prosecution to follow, has accused York of having sexual contact with as many as 13 girls and boys, including instances of sexual intercourse.

York, 58, has maintained he's being unfairly prosecuted because of a vendetta by small-town authorities who, he says, dislike the mostly black members of his cult for their unusual practices and a neo-Egyptian compound that includes pyramid-like structures complete with hieroglyphics.

The Nuwaubians, who once claimed 5,000 members but now are down to a few hundred, have actually gone through several transformations since moving to their 476-acre compound.

They've dressed as cowboys and American Indians, claimed to be Muslim and Jewish, and York has said he's an extraterrestrial from the planet "Rizq."

At a Christmas parade in Brunswick, the Nuwaubians said they were a Mason's group as they handed out literature and asked spectators about the guilt or innocence of York. Their delegation in the parade included depictions of the Egyptian pharaoh Rameses, participants wearing bird and cow masks, and a group of mummies carrying parasols.

York spent three years in a New York prison in the 1960s for assault, resisting arrest and possession of a dangerous weapon.

He joined the Black Panther Party and in 1967 formed a black nationalist group in New York.

He founded the Nuwaubian community after moving from New York under pressure from an FBI investigation and hostility between his group and other black Muslim organizations.

"I hope they put him away forever, and you know what? I wish somewhere his followers' minds could be cleansed to the point to see what he really is," said Georgia Smith, an Eatonton resident who has opposed the Nuwaubians. "I just hope after the trial, it's over with."

Copyright The Telegraph

York trial could become circus as proceedings get under way today

24 posted on 01/05/2004 3:01:49 AM PST by bd476 (Dateline Common Law: The New York Times Hires New/waubian Reporter)
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Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

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