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March 23, AD 536 ~ Mutiny of Justinian's Army in Africa
Gloria Romanorum ^ | Florentius

Posted on 03/23/2019 10:09:36 AM PDT by Antoninus

After his stunning re-conquest of Roman north Africa, and destruction of the Vandalic kingdom, Belisarius returned to Constantinople late in AD 534. He left prematurely because a conspiracy had sprung up accusing him of seeking to usurp the imperial power and set himself up as king of Africa. To defuse suspicion, he packed up his household and returned to the capital, his ships laden with the Vandal royalty as captives and the legendary Vandal treasure.

Once in Constantinople, Belisarius received a traditional Roman triumph. But while the imperial court celebrated, the situation in Africa deteriorated. Belisarius had left his former steward, Solomon, to govern the province and he was effective. However, three aspects of the situation in the region worked dangerously against him. Procopius describes them as follows:

After the Vandals had been defeated in the battle, as I have told previously, the Roman soldiers took their daughters and wives and made them their own by lawful marriage. And each one of these women kept urging her husband to lay claim to the possession of the lands which she had owned previously, saying that it was not right or fitting if, while living with the Vandals, they had enjoyed these lands, but after entering into marriage with the conquerors of the Vandals they were then to be deprived of their possessions. And having these things in mind, the soldiers did not think that they were bound to yield the lands of the Vandals to Solomon...This was one cause of the mutiny.

And there was a second, concurrent, cause also...It was as follows: In the Roman army there were, as it happened, not less than one thousand soldiers of the Arian faith; and the most of these were barbarians, some of these being of the Erulian nation. Now these men were urged on to the mutiny by the priests of the Vandals with the greatest zeal. For it was not possible for them to worship God in their accustomed way, but they were excluded both from all sacraments and from all sacred rites. For the Emperor Justinian did not allow any Christian who did not espouse the orthodox faith to receive baptism or any other sacrament....

And as if these things were not sufficient for Heaven, in its eagerness to ruin the fortunes of the Romans, it so fell out that still another thing provided an occasion for those who were planning the mutiny. For the Vandals whom Belisarius took to Byzantium were placed by the emperor in five cavalry squadrons, in order that they might be settled permanently in the cities of the East; he also called them the "Vandals of Justinian," and ordered them to betake themselves in ships to the East. Now the majority of these Vandal soldiers reached the East, and, filling up the squadrons to which they had been assigned, they have been fighting against the Persians up to the present time; but the remainder, about four hundred in number, after reaching Lesbos, waiting until the sails were bellied with the wind, forced the sailors to submission and sailed on till they reached the Peloponnesus. And setting sail from there, they came to land in Libya at a desert place, where they abandoned the ships, and, after equipping themselves, went up to Mt. Aurasium and Mauretania. [Procopius, History of the Wars, Book III, Chapter XIV]

These causes combining, the mutiny came to a head during the Easter season in AD 536. Procopius tells us that even the guards and servants of Solomon became embroiled in the conspiracy due to their desire for lands. Despite this, Solomon remained completely in the dark. Easter Sunday, March 23, 536, was set as the day for the uprising. But something went wrong. Procopius continues:

And when the appointed day had now come, Solomon was sitting in the sanctuary, utterly ignorant of his own misfortune. And those who had decided to kill the man went in, and, urging one another with nods, they put their hands to their swords, but they did nothing nevertheless, either because they were filled with awe of the rites then being performed in the sanctuary, or because the fame of the general caused them to be ashamed, or perhaps also some divine power prevented them. And when the rites on that day had been completely performed and all were betaking themselves homeward, the conspirators began to blame one another with having turned soft-hearted at no fitting time, and they postponed the plot for a second attempt on the following day. [Procopius, History of the Wars, Book III, Chapter XIV]

They tried again the next day, and failed again for the same reasons. At this point, some of them panicked. Worried that they would be discovered, a contingent of the mutineers fled Carthage and began acting as a rebellious army, plundering the countryside and manhandling the common folk.

Recognizing the danger, Solomon begged the soldiers who remained in Carthage to remain loyal to the emperor. He still had little idea of exactly how far the mutiny had progressed among his own men. At first, he seemed to be succeeding. However...

....On the fifth day, when [the soldiers] heard that those who had gone out were secure in their power, they gathered in the hippodrome and insulted Solomon and the other commanders without restraint. And Theodorus, the Cappadocian, being sent there by Solomon, attempted to dissuade them and win them by kind words, but they listened to nothing of what was said. Now this Theodorus had a certain hostility against Solomon and was suspected of plotting against him. For this reason the mutineers straightway elected him general over them by acclamation, and with him they went with all speed to the palace carrying weapons and raising a great tumult. There they killed another Theodorus, who was commander of the guards, a man of the greatest excellence in every respect and an especially capable warrior. And when they had tasted this blood, they began immediately to kill everyone they met, whether Libyan or Roman, if he were known to Solomon or had money in his hands; and then they turned to plundering, going up into the houses which had no soldiers to defend them and seizing all the most valuable things. [Procopius, History of the Wars, Book III, Chapter XIV]

With the revolt now raging in Carthage itself, Solomon and his few loyal guardsmen fled. They made for the harbor and set sail for Syracuse where Belisarius was quartered with his army in preparation for his impending campaign in Italy. Interestingly, Procopius himself was with Solomon, having been an eyewitness to the mutiny he records.

What happened next was but a footnote in the legendary career of Belisarius--but no less amazing than any of his other accomplishments.

The rest is an excerpt from an historical fiction account of the incident.


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: africa; belisarius; bravoforarianism; godsgravesglyphs; justinian; lateantiquity; procopius; roman; romanempire; rome; sectarianturmoil; solomon; vandals
This happened 1,483 years ago today.

Though not as impressive as his epic victories at Daras or Tricamarum or his capture of Gothic Ravenna, Belisarius's defeat of this mutiny with a mere handful of men counts as one of his most daring and heroic exploits.
1 posted on 03/23/2019 10:09:36 AM PDT by Antoninus
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To: SunkenCiv

Ancient History ping.


2 posted on 03/23/2019 10:16:09 AM PDT by Antoninus ("In Washington, swamp drain you.")
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To: Antoninus

Well, the Arians got what they wanted in the end. About a hundred years later, the Arian territories were overrun by islam. Maybe that’s why they were taken over so easily.


3 posted on 03/23/2019 10:44:41 AM PDT by CondorFlight
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To: Antoninus

I have to admit being mostly ignorant of Belisarius and Justinian. The little I learned was when I was in the Army stationed just outside Istanbul, and from reading historical fiction.

There was a good alternative history science fiction series that had Belisarius in it. Eric Flint was one of the authors. I think Pournelle may have been another. There was one more but his name escapes me.

If you know of any good books on Belisarius let me know.


4 posted on 03/23/2019 10:44:45 AM PDT by Tailback
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To: Tailback

I am sure you have read Robert Graves’ historical fiction ‘Count Belasarius’. If you haven’t, read it!


5 posted on 03/23/2019 10:48:40 AM PDT by Reily
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To: Reily

I haven’t....but I will!

Thanks!


6 posted on 03/23/2019 10:50:50 AM PDT by Tailback
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To: CondorFlight
Well, the Arians got what they wanted in the end. About a hundred years later, the Arian territories were overrun by islam. Maybe that’s why they were taken over so easily.

I don't think there were many Arians left in Africa by the late 7th century when the Arab armies arrived. The prevalence of Monophysites in Egypt did, however, make that particular Arab conquest much easier. The Monophysites hated the Orthodox in Constantinople so much, that some of them welcomed their conquerors with open arms. They had cause to regret their decision later, as John of Nikiu relates:

Death of the Emperor Heraclius and the Loss of Roman Egypt ~ February 11
7 posted on 03/23/2019 11:01:04 AM PDT by Antoninus ("In Washington, swamp drain you.")
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To: Antoninus

Dang! Has it been that long ago?... Seems just like yesterday...


8 posted on 03/23/2019 11:07:11 AM PDT by SuperLuminal (Where is Sam Adams now that we desperately need him)
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To: Tailback
If you know of any good books on Belisarius let me know.

Count Belisarius by Robert Graves is excellent.

I haven't read Flint's alternative histories, but they generally get good reviews. I'm not really a fan of alternative history, though.

The author of the blog this post is taken from has written two historical fiction books on Belisarius which appeal largely to teens and young adults.

I would also recommend reading Procopius's "official" histories of Justinian's reign -- the Vandalic and Gothic Wars are especially good. I encountered them for the first time in college and have read them maybe half a dozen times since then. Really engaging stuff if you enjoy ancient history. I'm not a fan of the "secret" history of Procopius which, sadly, is all most people have read.

Also, Harold Lamb wrote a book about this period called Theodora and the Emperor which is quite good.

Finally, I can recommend Ian Hughes bio called Belisarius: The Last Roman General which is a good, modern summation of the man and his times.
9 posted on 03/23/2019 11:10:47 AM PDT by Antoninus ("In Washington, swamp drain you.")
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To: Tailback
Sorry one more!

If you want a very detailed, scholarly biography of Belisarius referenced with Victorian-era British rigor, this one is still the best without question:



Lord Mahon's Life of Belisarius

10 posted on 03/23/2019 11:15:31 AM PDT by Antoninus ("In Washington, swamp drain you.")
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To: Tailback

Belisarius is one of the great generals of history.


11 posted on 03/23/2019 1:09:34 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Antoninus

“...Theodora and the Emperor ….”

Yes I have read this its very good!


12 posted on 03/23/2019 5:02:31 PM PDT by Reily
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To: Antoninus; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...
Thanks Antoninus.

13 posted on 03/24/2019 2:25:35 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (this tagline space is now available)
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To: Tailback

L. Sprague de Camp’s 1939 novel Lest Darkness Fall is a fun alternative history look at the period. It involves a modern (for 1939) American transported to Gothic Italy during the time of Belisarius’ invasion and his efforts to save his new home. And, of course, his girl.


14 posted on 03/24/2019 8:13:35 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("In a Time of Universal Deceit Telling the Truth Is a Revolutionary Act" - George Orwell)
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To: jalisco555; Antoninus

Thanks for the heads up on those books. I’ll get back to you with thoughts after I read them.


15 posted on 03/24/2019 9:10:40 AM PDT by Tailback
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