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Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula
Eurekalert ^ | Valentine's Day 2019 | Bibiana Bonmatí, University of Barcelona

Posted on 02/17/2019 5:04:54 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Coinciding with the Pit Grave culture (4200-3600 years before our era), coming from Southern Europe, the Neolithic communities of the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula started a ceremonial activity related to the sacrifice and burial of dogs. The high amount of cases that are recorded in Catalonia suggests it was a general practice and it proves the tight relationship between humans and these animals, which, apart from being buried next to them, were fed a similar diet to humans'... The study analyses the remains of twenty-six dogs found in funerary structures from four sites and necropolises of the Barcelona region, and has conducted an isotopic analysis for eighteen of them, to determine whether the relation with their owners included other aspects, such as a control of their diet. Dogs were aged between one month and six years old, predominating hose between twelve and eighteen years old, and had homogeneous sizes, between forty and fifty centimetres high. These were mainly buried in circular graves, together or near the humans, although some have been found separately in nearby graves and one was found at the entrance of the mortuary chamber. The skeletons were semi-complete in anatomical connection -only one was found as full, near a kid- without bone fractures or marks due manipulation by evisceration, or any signs of predators... The isotopic study of the remains and its comparison with humans' and other herbivorous animals' diet in the site shows the diet of most of these animals was similar to the diet of humans, with a high presence of cereal, such as corn, and vegetables. In two puppies and two adult dogs, nutrition was mainly vegetarian and only a few cases had a diet rich in animal protein.

(Excerpt) Read more at eurekalert.org ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: arfarfbabytogotogo; bowser; bowwow; catalonia; dogs; godsgravesglyphs; iberia; isotopicanalysis; lassie; neolithic; pitgraveculture; rover; woof
Top: remains of adult dog in partial anatomical connection in La Serreta. Bottom: dog in anatomical connection between human skeletons, in the necropolis Bòbila Madurell. Credit: UB-UAB

Top: remains of adult dog in partial anatomical connection in La Serreta. Bottom: dog in anatomical connection between human skeletons, in the necropolis Bòbila Madurell. Credit: UB-UAB

1 posted on 02/17/2019 5:04:54 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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I would say neolithic muslims outraged, but its impossible to tell the difference between them and the modern ones


2 posted on 02/17/2019 5:08:10 PM PST by dsrtsage (For Leftists, World History starts every day at breakfast)
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To: dsrtsage

Ceremonial killing of companion dogs. Sort of a sad comment on what happened to man’s best friend if man died 1st.


3 posted on 02/17/2019 5:31:13 PM PST by Trumpet 1 (US Constitution is my guide.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Dogs are prolific, which means any one individual doesn’t have a high value to the community. Bummer.


4 posted on 02/17/2019 5:54:44 PM PST by Tax-chick (They should have listened to Julian Simon.)
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To: SunkenCiv; All

“with a high presence of cereal, such as corn, and vegetables. In two puppies and two adult dogs, nutrition was mainly vegetarian and only a few cases had a diet rich in animal protein.”

This PROVES they are lying!

There was no corn outside the Americans until about 500 years ago. Anywhere.

And nobody, and I mean NOBODY back then was stupid enough to try to sustain dogs on a vegetarian diet. It can’t be done.

Even IF it could, the dogs would have left and hunted for themselves.

This is more BS global warming, get rid of the cows and meat propaganda!


5 posted on 02/17/2019 6:14:55 PM PST by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: Mariner

The “corn” might be a translation error. “Corn” can mean any grain that produces seeds in a head, such as wheat or sorghum.


6 posted on 02/17/2019 6:22:13 PM PST by Tax-chick (They should have listened to Julian Simon.)
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To: Mariner
Some call it corn. We call it maize.

In Europe, corn is wheat, barely, rye or oats.

7 posted on 02/17/2019 6:23:51 PM PST by Alas Babylon! (The media is after us. Trump's just in the way.)
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To: Alas Babylon!

And, how to sustain a canine on a vegetarian diet?


8 posted on 02/17/2019 6:26:15 PM PST by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: Alas Babylon!
You started it.


9 posted on 02/17/2019 6:38:10 PM PST by Rebelbase (If Trump walked on water the press headline would read, "TRUMP CAN'T SWIM".)
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To: Mariner

Well, how else do you think they died?


10 posted on 02/17/2019 7:29:57 PM PST by Alas Babylon! (The media is after us. Trump's just in the way.)
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To: Mariner

There was no corn outside the Americans until about 500 years ago. Anywhere
***********************
The word corn in English predates the discovery of the new world. In The Canterbury Tales which was written prior to 1400 there are several mentions of corn. Corn was the word for grain, when maize was brought from the new world the word corn was also applied to it. In a U.K. supermarket what we call corn will usually be labeled maize.


11 posted on 02/17/2019 7:52:37 PM PST by GaryCrow
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To: SunkenCiv

I bury lots of dogs. Only one stone, goes to the last thing burried. (reminds me where not to dig). It is winter here now. I have one open hole dug in the fall, just in case something goes bad in the winter.

My back yard is the family pet cemetery. Probably 20 dogs and a hundred cats over my time. The kids like the stone when I bury a rat or dog or whatever animal they lose.

I tell the little ones I am not burying a loved pet, I am planting a soul seed back to the earth.

Someone has to do it.


12 posted on 02/17/2019 8:28:36 PM PST by mmercier0921 (bark at the moon)
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To: mmercier0921
That's moving.

13 posted on 02/17/2019 9:57:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv (and btw -- https://www.gofundme.com/for-rotator-cuff-repair-surgery)
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To: Mariner
Looks like that's been answered, but I'd just add that Julius Caesar worried about the corn supply for his troops. By and large, in Britain, corn EVEN TODAY refers to wheat. What we call corn, the British call maize. They also say aluminium, and "Rimsky-KorSAHkov".

14 posted on 02/17/2019 11:25:00 PM PST by SunkenCiv (and btw -- https://www.gofundme.com/for-rotator-cuff-repair-surgery)
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