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1 posted on 06/22/2013 6:22:01 AM PDT by LS
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To: LS

Years ago (over 10 maybe 20 years, IIRC) Atlanta was cited by the FBI as having ‘fudged’ on their murder crime rates. In effect what they did was illegal and intentional.

It involved in re-classifying murders (or deaths) into other lesser status crimes.

This was back when we had a government that was not so totally corrupt and subversive as now.


2 posted on 06/22/2013 6:26:53 AM PDT by Gaffer
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To: LS
I don't have anything off-hand right now, but there was a great article in a New York City magazine or newspaper on this subject a few years ago. I have to give credit where credit was due, since it was a left-leaning publication (either the Village Voice or New Yorker, but pulled no punches in exposing the outright misinformation from the city's police bureaucracy.

The author of the article was motivated to write it after he witnessed the aftermath of a homicide in the subway but then spent weeks following up on it with the police department without ever finding any evidence that it was ever reported and documented in their records.

I hope this is helpful. I will try to track that article down when I have time.

3 posted on 06/22/2013 6:30:33 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: LS
I've seen stats (can't recall their source) that suggest that on a per capita basis NYC has a noticeably lower murder rate (the only stats I've seen were for murder rate) than just about any other large of medium sized US city.Any claims that Doomberg & Pals might make that it's because of strict gun laws is silly.Vermont,a neighboring state,has very lax guns laws (surprisingly enough).Virginia,not that far down the road,does as well.One thing I've repeatedly heard is that, starting with Giuliani,the NYPD has had a policy of aggressively addressing small crimes which,it's said,somehow lessens serious crimes.I'm not a criminologist so I'm not sure how that might work,but...
6 posted on 06/22/2013 6:57:04 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (The Civil Servants Are No Longer Servants...Or Civil.)
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To: LS

I don’t know the answer to your question, but I will share an impression.

I lived in Brooklyn or Manhattan until 1980, and I have visited frequently since.

The changes in the first two years of the Giuliani administration were real, and they were enormous. There was some washover into the early 2000s, because a lot of bad guys were still Upstate, as we say.

It’s getting worse again, and pretty quickly - but NYC is nothing like the nearly all-black cities of the midwest and southeast, crime wise, and probably will never be. Brooklyn is gentrifying in places I never would have thought it could happen.

YMMV, of course.


8 posted on 06/22/2013 7:01:34 AM PDT by Jim Noble (When strong, avoid them. Attack their weaknesses. Emerge to their surprise.)
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To: LS

The ‘FBI Uniform Crime Report (for each year)’ is the standard by which police crime statistics are collated and arrainged by state-by-state .
I am unsure if the statistics are broken down by metropolitan or urban areas .


9 posted on 06/22/2013 7:05:38 AM PDT by Tilted Irish Kilt (“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” - Ronald Reagan)
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To: LS
My understanding is that stats are as accurate as they can be and if anything, they overstate the homicide rate to include people who have died from homicides that occurred in prior years (i.e., deaths previously classified in prior years as accidental are reclassified as homicides; assault and DUI victims who die from their injuries in later years. The crime stats are also consistent with my personal observations over the years.
10 posted on 06/22/2013 7:08:29 AM PDT by Labyrinthos
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To: LS

Go to the FBI website and you can build a statistical table.And yes , you can identify a single metroplitan area , with multiple policing agencies.

The website : http://www.ucrdatatool.gov/


11 posted on 06/22/2013 7:17:04 AM PDT by Tilted Irish Kilt (“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” - Ronald Reagan)
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To: LS

NYC had crazy crime stats years ago—when it was a dangerous city.

It now truly is very same in most areas, with crime stats that reflect as much.

IMO it is tough policing and gentrification that have made the city safer, not gun laws.


12 posted on 06/22/2013 7:18:12 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: LS
As soon as Pataki signed the death penalty in 1995 after Cuomo vetoed it 12 years in a row, the homicide rate dropped in half.

Mario Cuomo has the blood of 15,000 murdered New Yorkers on his hands.

Giuliani doubled the size of the cops and told them to take down the homicidal maniacs standing around that where obviously packing (you don't have to be a rocket scientist to tell).

The commies complained, but the streets were safer.

Now with King anal soda pop in Gracie Mansion and Cuoumo II in Albany, you would have to be not very bright to live in NYC unless you have a Death Wish.

But former Gov. Mario M. Cuomo, who vetoed 12 death penalty bills before Mr. Pataki defeated him last year, said of the new law: "This is a step back in what should be a march constantly toward a higher level of civility and intelligence. The argument that the death penalty will deter and reduce crimes has been abandoned almost everywhere."

New York Crime Rates 1960 - 2011


New York Crime Rates 1960 - 2011
Forcible  Aggravated  Larceny-  Vehicle 
Year  Population  Index  Violent  Property  Murder  Rape  Robbery  assault  Burglary  Theft  Theft 
1965  18,073,000  554,050  58,802  495,248  836  2,320  28,182  27,464  183,443  253,353  58,452 
1966  18,258,000  609,465  62,561  546,904  882  2,439  30,098  29,142  196,127  286,409  64,368 
1967  18,336,000  692,528  75,124  617,404  996  2,665  40,202  31,261  219,157  314,472  83,775 
1968  18,113,000  829,453  98,515  730,938  1,185  2,527  59,857  34,946  250,918  375,143  104,877 
1969  18,321,000  837,210  105,870  731,340  1,324  2,902  64,754  36,890  248,477  367,463  115,400 
1970  18,190,740  904,314  124,613  779,701  1,444  2,875  81,149  39,145  267,474  386,553  125,674 
1971  18,391,000  935,022  145,048  789,974  1,823  3,225  97,682  42,318  273,704  388,612  127,658 
1972  18,366,000  804,605  138,542  666,063  2,026  4,199  86,391  45,926  239,886  321,096  105,081 
1973  18,265,000  814,349  135,468  678,881  2,040  4,852  80,795  47,781  246,246  320,307  112,328 
1974  18,111,000  911,703  145,427  766,276  1,919  5,240  86,814  51,454  271,824  390,357  104,095 
1975  18,120,000  1,021,197  155,187  866,010  1,996  5,099  93,499  54,593  301,996  447,740  116,274 
1976  18,084,000  1,125,739  156,988  968,751  1,969  4,663  95,718  54,638  318,919  516,328  133,504 
1977  17,924,000  1,091,144  149,087  942,057  1,919  5,272  84,703  57,193  309,735  498,653  133,669 
1978  17,748,000  1,027,993  149,257  878,736  1,820  5,168  83,785  58,484  292,956  466,516  119,264 
1979  17,649,000  1,095,140  161,906  933,234  2,092  5,394  93,471  60,949  308,302  500,589  124,343 
1980  17,506,690  1,209,984  180,235  1,029,749  2,228  5,405  112,273  60,329  360,925  535,783  133,041 
1981  17,594,000  1,214,935  188,178  1,026,757  2,166  5,479  120,344  60,189  350,422  539,486  136,849 
1982  17,659,000  1,142,202  174,833  967,369  2,013  5,159  107,843  59,818  295,245  534,244  137,880 
1983  17,667,000  1,042,811  161,489  881,322  1,958  5,296  94,783  59,452  249,115  504,346  127,861 
1984  17,735,000  989,126  162,157  826,969  1,786  5,599  89,900  64,872  222,956  488,621  115,392 
1985  17,783,000  993,811  165,365  828,446  1,683  5,706  89,706  68,270  219,633  502,276  106,537 
1986  17,772,000  1,025,037  175,210  849,827  1,907  5,415  91,360  76,528  217,010  519,570  113,247 
1987  17,825,000  1,061,021  179,691  881,330  2,016  5,537  89,721  82,417  216,826  539,175  125,329 
1988  17,898,000  1,129,241  196,396  932,845  2,244  5,479  97,434  91,239  218,060  560,887  153,898 
1989  17,950,000  1,129,638  203,042  926,596  2,246  5,242  103,983  91,571  211,130  544,459  171,007 
1990  17,990,455  1,144,874  212,458  932,416  2,605  5,368  112,380  92,105  208,813  536,012  187,591 
1991  18,058,000  1,127,651  210,184  917,467  2,571  5,085  112,342  90,186  204,499  531,681  181,287 
1992  18,119,000  1,061,489  203,311  858,178  2,397  5,152  108,154  87,608  193,548  495,708  168,922 
1993  18,197,000  1,010,176  195,352  814,824  2,420  5,008  102,122  85,802  181,709  481,166  151,949 
1994  18,169,000  921,278  175,433  745,845  2,016  4,700  86,617  82,100  164,650  452,322  128,873 
1995  18,136,000  827,025  152,683  674,342  1,550  4,290  72,492  74,351  146,562  425,184  102,596 
1996  18,185,000  751,456  132,206  619,250  1,353  4,174  61,822  64,857  129,828  399,522  89,900 
1997  18,137,000  709,328  124,890  584,438  1,093  4,075  56,094  63,628  118,306  386,435  79,697 
1998  18,175,000  652,202  115,915  536,287  924  3,843  49,125  62,023  104,821  363,295  68,171 
1999  18,196,601  596,743  107,147  489,596  903  3,563  43,821  58,860  93,217  338,118  58,261 
2000  18,976,457  588,189  124,890  483,078  952  3,530  40,539 60,090  87,946  340,901 54,231 
2001  19,084,350  556,025  98,022  458,003  960  3,546  36,555  56,961  80,400  329,316  48,287 
2002 19,134,293  537,121 95,030  442,091  909  3,885 36,653  53,583  76,700  318,025  47,366 
2003  19,212,425  521,565  89,486  432,079  934  3,775  35,790  48,987  75,453  311,422  45,204 
2004  19,280,727  507,648  84,914  422,734  889  3,608  33,506  46,911  70,696  311,036  41,002 
2005  19,315,721  491,829  85,839  405,990  874  3,636  35,179 46,150 68,034 302,220 35,736 
2006  19,306,183  482,270  83,966  396,304  921  3,169  34,489 45,387 68,565 295,605 32,134 
2007  19,297,729  461,731  79,915  381,816  801  2,926  31,094 45,094 64,857 288,929 28,030 
2008 19,467,789  466,131  77,546  388,585  836  2,799  31,789 42,122 65,537 297,952 25,096 
2009 19,541,453  452,647  75,110  377,537  781  2,582  28,141 43,606 62,769 292,897 21,871 
2010 19,395,206 456,202 76,492 379,710 868 2,797 28,630 44,197 65,839 293,232 20,639
2011 19,465,197 449,745 77,490 372,255 774 2,752 28,396 45,568 65,397 287,547 19,311
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UCR Crime Statistics prepared by the:
The Disaster Center
New York Crime Index Rates Per 100,000 Inhabitants
Forcible  Aggravated  Larceny-  Vehicle 
Year  Population  Index  Violent  Property  Murder  Rape  Robbery  assault  Burglary  Theft  Theft 
1965  18,073,000  3,065.6  325.4  2,740.3  4.6  12.8  155.9  152.0  1,015.0  1,401.8  323.4 
1966  18,258,000  3,338.1  342.6  2,995.4  4.8  13.4  164.8  159.6  1,074.2  1,568.7  352.5 
1967  18,336,000  3,776.9  409.7  3,367.2  5.4  14.5  219.3  170.5  1,195.2  1,715.1  456.9 
1968  18,113,000  4,579.3  543.9  4,035.4  6.5  14.0  330.5  192.9  1,385.3  2,071.1  579.0 
1969  18,321,000  4,569.7  577.9  3,991.8  7.2  15.8  353.4  201.4  1,356.2  2,005.7  629.9 
1970  18,190,740  4,971.3  685.0  4,286.3  7.9  15.8  446.1  215.2  1,470.4  2,125.0  690.9 
1971  18,391,000  5,084.1  788.7  4,295.4  9.9  17.5  531.1  230.1  1,488.2  2,113.1  694.1 
1972  18,366,000  4,380.9  754.3  3,626.6  11.0  22.9  470.4  250.1  1,306.1  1,748.3  572.1 
1973  18,265,000  4,458.5  741.7  3,716.8  11.2  26.6  442.3  261.6  1,348.2  1,753.7  615.0 
1974  18,111,000  5,034.0  803.0  4,231.0  10.6  28.9  479.3  284.1  1,500.9  2,155.4  574.8 
1975  18,120,000  5,635.7  856.4  4,779.3  11.0  28.1  516.0  301.3  1,666.6  2,471.0  641.7 
1976  18,084,000  6,225.1  868.1  5,357.0  10.9  25.8  529.3  302.1  1,763.5  2,855.2  738.2 
1977  17,924,000  6,087.6  831.8  5,255.8  10.7  29.4  472.6  319.1  1,728.0  2,782.0  745.8 
1978  17,748,000  5,792.2  841.0  4,951.2  10.3  29.1  472.1  329.5  1,650.6  2,628.6  672.0 
1979  17,649,000  6,205.1  917.4  5,287.7  11.9  30.6  529.6  345.3  1,746.9  2,836.4  704.5 
1980  17,506,690  6,911.6  1,029.5  5,882.0  12.7  30.9  641.3  344.6  2,061.6  3,060.4  759.9 
1981  17,594,000  6,905.4  1,069.6  5,835.8  12.3  31.1  684.0  342.1  1,991.7  3,066.3  777.8 
1982  17,659,000  6,468.1  990.1  5,478.1  11.4  29.2  610.7  338.7  1,671.9  3,025.3  780.8 
1983  17,667,000  5,902.6  914.1  4,988.5  11.1  30.0  536.5  336.5  1,410.1  2,854.7  723.7 
1984  17,735,000  5,577.3  914.3  4,662.9  10.1  31.6  506.9  365.8  1,257.2 2,755.1  650.6 
1985  17,783,000  5,588.5  929.9  4,658.6  9.5  32.1  504.4  383.9  1,235.1  2,824.5  599.1 
1986  17,772,000  5,767.7  985.9  4,781.8  10.7  30.5  514.1  430.6  1,221.1  2,923.5  637.2 
1987  17,825,000  5,952.4  1,008.1  4,944.3  11.3  31.1  503.3  462.4  1,216.4  3,024.8  703.1 
1988  17,898,000  6,309.3  1,097.3  5,212.0  12.5  30.6  544.4  509.8  1,218.3  3,133.8  859.9 
1989  17,950,000  6,293.2  1,131.2  5,162.1  12.5  29.2  579.3  510.1  1,176.2  3,033.2  952.7 
1990  17,990,455  6,363.8  1,180.9  5,182.8  14.5  29.8  624.7  512.0  1,160.7  2,979.4  1,042.7 
1991  18,058,000  6,244.6  1,163.9  5,080.7  14.2  28.2  622.1  499.4  1,132.5  2,944.3  1,003.9 
1992  18,119,000  5,858.4  1,122.1  4,736.3  13.2  28.4  596.9  483.5  1,068.2  2,735.8  932.3 
1993  18,197,000  5,551.3  1,073.5  4,477.8  13.3  27.5  561.2  471.5  998.6  2,644.2  835.0 
1994  18,169,000  5,070.6  965.6  4,105.0  11.1  25.9  476.7  451.9  906.2  2,489.5  709.3 
1995  18,136,000  4,560.1  841.9  3,718.3  8.5  23.7  399.7  410.0  808.1  2,344.4  565.7 
1996  18,185,000  4,132.3  727.0  3,405.3  7.4  23.0  340.0  356.7  713.9  2,197.0  494.4 
1997  18,137,000  3,910.9  688.6  3,222.4  6.0  22.5  309.3  350.8  652.3  2,130.6  439.4 
1998  18,175,000  3,588.5  637.8  2,950.7  5.1  21.1  270.3  341.3  576.7 1,998.9  375.1
1999  18,196,601  3,279.4  588.8  2,690.6  5.0  19.6  240.8  323.5  512.3  1,858.1  320.2 
2000  18,976,457  3,099.6  553.9  2,545.7  5.0  18.6  213.6  316.7  463.4  1,796.4  285.8
2001  19,084,350  2,913.5  513.6 2,399.9 5.0  18.6  191.5  298.5  421.3  1,725.6  253.0 
2002  19,134,293  2,807.1  496.6  2,310.5  4.8  20.3  191.6  280.0  400.9  1,662.1  247.5
2003  19,212,425  2,714.8  465.8  2,249.0  4.9   19.6  186.3  255.0  392.7 1,620.9  235.3
2004  19,280,727  2,632.9  440.4  2,192.5  4.6  18.7  173.8  243.3 366.7  1,613.2  212.7 
2005  19,315,721 2,554.3  444.4  2,101.9  4.5  18.8  182.1  238.9  352.2  1,564.6  185.0
2006  19,306,183  2,487.6  434.9  2,052.7  4.8  16.4  178.6  235.1  355.1  1,531.1  166.4
2007  19,297,729 2,392.7  414.1  1,978.6  4.2  15.2  161.1  233.7  336.1  1,497.2  145.3
2008 19,467,789 2,394.3  398.3  1,996.0  4.3  14.4  163.0  216.4  336.6  1,530.5  128.9
2009 19,541,453 2,316.4  384.4  1,932.0  4.0  13.2  144.0  223.1  321.2  1,498.8 111.9
2010 19,395,206 2,352.2 394.4 1,957.8 4.5 14.4 147.6 227.9 339.5 1,511.9 106.4
2011 19,465,197 2,310.5 398.1 1,912.4 4.0 14.1 145.9 234.1 336.0 1,477.2  99.2
US States Crime 2004 -2006 Crimes per 100,000 and Ranking
The table below provides the rank of each State's reported rate of crime as compared to the 50 States and the District of Columbia.  1 = the highest reported crime rate and 51 = the lowest. Going from one year to the next a higher number means, that compared to other States, the relative crime rate is increasing and a lower number means that the relative level of crime is decreasing.  The Index category represents the total number of crimes, and since most crimes involve property crime it is weighted towards these types of crime.  
State Year Population   Index   Violent   Property   Murder    Forcible Rape   Robbery   Aggravated assault   Burglary   Larceny- Theft   Vehicle Theft 
New York 2008 3 47 25 49 27 50 11 26 48 49 46
New York  2007  3 48 25 48 29 50 11 25 49 48 46
New York  2006  3 47 23 48 27 50 9 25 48 48 44
New York  2005  3 46 22 48 29 49 5 25 48 47 45


United States Crime Statistics
* United States Alaska* Alabama * Arkansas * Arizona * California * Colorado * ConnecticutDelaware Florida * Georgia * Hawaii * Iowa * Idaho * Illinois * Indiana * Kansas * Kentucky * Louisiana * Massachusetts * Maryland * Maine * Michigan * Minnesota * Missouri * Mississippi * Montana * North Carolina * North Dakota * Nebraska * New Hampshire * New Jersey * New Mexico * Nevada * New York * Ohio * Oklahoma * Oregon * Pennsylvania * Rhode Island * South Carolina * South Dakota * Tennessee * Texas * Utah * Virginia * Vermont * Washington D. C. * Washington * Wisconsin * West Virginia * Wyoming *

Copyright 1997-2012

 The Disaster Center provides online coverage of disasters in the United States, compiling and providing links to disaster related statistics and studies: US Crimes Data from 1960  Tornado, Nonfatal occupational Injuries and Illnesses, Fatal Occupational Injuries, Motor Vehicle Traffic Injury and Fatality Data,  Child Nursery Equipment and Toys: Accident Rates by Age, Sports & Recreational Equipment: Injuries by Age and Sex, Home, Heating, Plumbing, and Appliance: Injuries by Cause, Age, and Rate, Furniture, furnishings, household, and personal use items: Accident injury rates by AgeHome, Work Tools and Misc. Items: Accident Injury rates by Age. US Cause of Death Data US Anti-terrorism Threat/Risk Policy prior to September 11, 2001,  US Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Terrorism Policy prior to 9-11  Atlantic Hurricane pages and indexTotal student, Number of school-associated Violent Deaths and Number of Homicides and Suicides of Youth Ages 5–19, by Location: 1992–2002  Crimes and Indexes for USA Metropolitan Statistical Areas 

Source: FBI, Uniform Crime Reports


14 posted on 06/22/2013 7:22:14 AM PDT by Rome2000 (THE WASHINGTONIANS AND UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE ARE THE ENEMY -ROTATE THE CAPITAL AMONGST THE STATES)
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To: LS
The NYT has a treasure trove of stats on an interactive map. You can drill into it and filter it six ways from Sunday. I made a screen cap of this page last year. Go to the NYT for this date, and the map should still be up.


15 posted on 06/22/2013 7:23:09 AM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: LS

I think you are expressing it wrong. I wouldn’t say New York City has “low levels of crime.” Say something like, New York City has low levels of crime compared to previous decades or something like that.


20 posted on 06/22/2013 7:41:46 AM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: LS
It's not as if there are two sets of stats reported: actual and claimed. You should remember, if faking crime stats is true, exposing it is going to be controversial. It may take you a bit of digging, but here's a place for you to start (if you're interested). Good luck.

Nicholas Stix lives in NYC area and writes extensively on violent crime.

Here's a sample on "Disappearing Urban Crime"

Here's a quote (not his but is in an article which he cites - scroll down at the link):
Patrolmen's Benevolent Association president Patrick Lynch had said that officers "are forced to falsify stats in order to maintain the appearance of a drastic reduction in crime,"

Here's what Wikipedia says (said?) about him and he about them.
28 posted on 06/22/2013 12:03:21 PM PDT by caveat emptor (!)
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