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Best Art in the Universe
AOL News ^ | December 15 2010 | Ben Muessig

Posted on 12/18/2010 7:14:46 PM PST by Beowulf9

Best Art in the Universe? Hubble Space Telescope's Amazing Pics From 2010

(Dec. 15) -- You might think that taking highly detailed photographs of the darkest corners of the universe would be a purely scientific job. Turns out, there's an art to it.

For the past 20 years, the Hubble Space Telescope has been orbiting the planet and wowing earthlings with breathtaking images of outer space, from jaw-dropping pictures of clusters of newborn stars to fantastic photos of colliding galaxies.

But it's not just Hubble's cutting-edge optics that are responsible for these stunning photographs. Behind each image is the hard work of a team of researchers in Baltimore, who balance art and astronomy to capture out-of-this-world pictures that further our knowledge of outer space.


TOPICS: Astronomy; Astronomy Picture of the Day; Science
KEYWORDS: astronomy; hubble; stars; universe

1 posted on 12/18/2010 7:14:49 PM PST by Beowulf9
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To: Beowulf9

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2004/07/image/a/


2 posted on 12/18/2010 7:29:33 PM PST by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole....)
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To: Beowulf9

3 posted on 12/18/2010 7:30:11 PM PST by Roscoe Karns
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To: Roscoe Karns

OK, that was very clever

You win a cookie :-)


4 posted on 12/18/2010 7:31:35 PM PST by IrishCatholic (No local Communist or Socialist Party Chapter? Join the Democrats, it's the same thing!)
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To: JoeProBono

Thoughts?


5 posted on 12/18/2010 7:32:45 PM PST by knews_hound (Credo Quia Absurdium--take nothing seriously unless it is absurd. E. Clampus Vitus)
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To: Beowulf9
Galaxy cluster Abell 1689:

The yellow galaxies in this image belong to the cluster itself, however, the red and blue distorted streaks are background galaxies gravitationally lensed by the cluster. Some of the lensed galaxies are over 13 billion light years (4000 megaparsec) distant. The lensing zone itself is 2 million light years (0.60 megaparsec) across.

6 posted on 12/18/2010 7:36:38 PM PST by Abin Sur
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To: Abin Sur
Sumpin' big's lurkin' in there.

The original troll perhaps?

7 posted on 12/18/2010 7:38:25 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: knews_hound

8 posted on 12/18/2010 7:41:47 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: Abin Sur

Re #6: I can see my house. Neat!


9 posted on 12/18/2010 7:46:18 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: Roscoe Karns; windcliff; onedoug

LOL!


10 posted on 12/18/2010 7:53:54 PM PST by stylecouncilor (What Would Jim Thompson Do?)
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To: hosepipe
Photobucket
11 posted on 12/18/2010 7:58:01 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: keypro
Photobucket
12 posted on 12/18/2010 7:58:44 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: muawiyah
Sumpin' big's lurkin' in there.

Funny you should say that...

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took advantage of a giant cosmic magnifying glass to create one of the sharpest and most detailed maps of dark matter in the universe. Dark matter is an invisible and unknown substance that makes up the bulk of the universe's mass.

The new dark matter observations may yield new insights into the role of dark energy in the universe's early formative years. The result suggests that galaxy clusters may have formed earlier than expected, before the push of dark energy inhibited their growth. A mysterious property of space, dark energy fights against the gravitational pull of dark matter. Dark energy pushes galaxies apart from one another by stretching the space between them, thereby suppressing the formation of giant structures called galaxy clusters. One way astronomers can probe this primeval tug-of-war is through mapping the distribution of dark matter in clusters.

A team led by Dan Coe at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., used Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys to chart the invisible matter in the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1689, located 2.2 billion light-years away. The cluster's gravity, the majority of which comes from dark matter, acts like a cosmic magnifying glass, bending and amplifying the light from distant galaxies behind it. This effect, called gravitational lensing, produces multiple, warped, and greatly magnified images of those galaxies, like the view in a funhouse mirror. By studying the distorted images, astronomers estimated the amount of dark matter within the cluster. If the cluster's gravity only came from the visible galaxies, the lensing distortions would be much weaker.

13 posted on 12/18/2010 7:58:44 PM PST by Abin Sur
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To: keypro
Photobucket
14 posted on 12/18/2010 7:59:34 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: keypro
Photobucket
15 posted on 12/18/2010 8:00:16 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: keypro
Photobucket
16 posted on 12/18/2010 8:01:31 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: Beowulf9
Pictures like these are wonderful, but they have one (tiny) negative unintended consequence: they occasionally lead to disappointment when someone looks through an amateur (or even semi-pro) telescope for the first time.

They've grown up seeing pictures like this, and they expect to see something like that through the scope, and instead when they look at the Orion Nebula with their naked eye for the first time, their reaction is "But...it's just some green fuzz! Shouldn't it look like the Mutara Nebula in Star Trek II?"

17 posted on 12/18/2010 8:17:45 PM PST by Abin Sur
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To: keypro

Thanks for putting these on here, I had no idea how and they are so fantastic!


18 posted on 12/18/2010 8:36:04 PM PST by Beowulf9
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To: Beowulf9

Thanks Beowulf9,
As the title of this thread proclaimed,
Best Art in the Universe.


19 posted on 12/18/2010 9:03:01 PM PST by keypro (Ducksnorts)
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To: Beowulf9

Perty stuff. :-) Thanks!


20 posted on 12/18/2010 9:05:45 PM PST by bannie (Gone to seed.)
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To: keypro

Look like my colonoscopy photos taken last week. Gee, didn’t know my insides were so pretty.


21 posted on 12/18/2010 10:09:52 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: Beowulf9
Aren't they wonderful? I created a screensaver of them for my comp several years ago. 265 of them; the best views in the uni (multi) verse!

IMO everyone should take a week or so and go out to the Hubble site and flip through the images. They're magnificent.

They better not pull Hubble down until they got something better to replace it with. Hubble's given us a mind-boggling amount of knowledge about the solar system and the universe that we can get from no other source.

Godspeed

HoA

22 posted on 12/18/2010 11:33:28 PM PST by HeartlandOfAmerica (Obama and the Dem Congress will spend $5 trillion every year of his presidency until they break US!)
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To: HeartlandOfAmerica

My UCLA astrophysicist son tells me that new ground-based telescopes will soon outdo Hubble, except in the x-ray band, where the atmosphere is too absorptive. Computational methods can now correct for the distorting effects of the atmosphere in real time. Soon you’ll be able to do Hubble-like photos using larger mirrors that you couldn’t possibly launch into space.


23 posted on 12/19/2010 12:06:45 AM PST by AZLiberty (Yes, Mr. Lennon, I do want a revolution.)
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To: Beowulf9
The Hershel IR scope took photos of IR Galaxies which aren't visible to us because there's so much dust between us we can't view them except in the IR spectrum. Photobucket
24 posted on 12/19/2010 2:19:03 AM PST by saganite (What happens to taglines? Is there a termination date?)
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To: saganite

That is amazing but I totally see a face in that picture. Just imagination I know but it’s so clear to me. A man, mouth open.


25 posted on 12/19/2010 11:12:58 PM PST by Beowulf9
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