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Lance Armstrong - A Lesson In The Futility Of Sports Royalty
Political Realities ^ | 01/18/13 | LD Jackson

Posted on 01/18/2013 4:52:21 AM PST by LD Jackson

For today's post, I want to depart from the normal news and political chatter we normally discuss and focus on something that I believe is travesty, both in America and across the world. For decades, Lance Armstrong has been the epitome of toughness and grit in the world of sports. He managed to beat cancer, no small feat there, and then came back to win the Tour de France seven years running. He was heralded as a superstar and he became a millionaire because of his victories and the resulting endorsements. All of this took place amidst accusations of doping.

As everyone is sure to know by know, Lance Armstrong has admitted to Oprah Winfrey that he has been guilty of doping for about 20 years. Never mind that he has denied it throughout his career, he's admitting it now. It seems it is the worst-kept secret of the sports world, but the only people who seemed to care were the organizations that oversee the sport of cycling. The fans didn't seem to mind and maybe that's what kept Lance Armstrong going. Maybe he was doing it for the fans? Not a chance! He was really doing it for the money and fame and once he got a taste, he was addicted.

The most troubling part of this entire story is the attitude Lance Armstrong has about what he has done. Fox News has a portion of the interview on their website. I thought it was very telling in what it shared.

"At the time it did not feel wrong?" Winfrey asked.

"No," Armstrong replied. "Scary."

"Did you feel bad about it?" she pressed him.

"No," he said. "Even scarier."

"Did you feel in any way that you were cheating?"

"No," Armstrong paused. "Scariest."

"I went and looked up the definition of cheat," he added a moment later. "And the definition is to gain an advantage on a rival or foe. I didn't view it that way. I viewed it as a level playing field."

Lance ArmstrongYou will have to forgive me if I sound a bit skeptical about Lance Armstrong and his admission of guilt. I have no insider knowledge of the affair, but I get the sense he is sorry he was found out, not sorry he cheated. Just a thought, but why is he confessing to Oprah Winfrey, instead of to the organizations he has lied to for 20 years? I wonder if he doesn't still have a leg in this game and is trying to work it all to his advantage?

Why the title of this post, A Lesson In the Futility of Sports Royalty? I can't tell you how many people I know who absolutely idolize the players of our most popular sports. When Adrian Peterson was playing for the Oklahoma Sooners, he was already being heralded as one of the greatest running backs to ever play the game of football. That heralding is even louder after his remarkable comeback after having his knee surgically repaired. I am not trying to take away from his ability or desire to win, but he is still just a man who is being paid millions of dollars to carry an oblong ball up and down a 100 yard field of grass or artificial turf. He is also the man who proclaimed NFL players should be likened to slaves.

Lance Armstrong is a perfect example of how futile it is to lift up a player of any sport. No matter what sport, or if they are a man or a woman, they are still human, just like you and I. Lance Armstrong is a man who cheated at the sport he was involved in. Nothing more and nothing less. Our society should recognize that and realize the mistake so many of us make by acting as if these players are royalty.

Hmmm, that sounds like some of the politicians we have in Washington. Maybe this should also be applied to them.


TOPICS: Sports
KEYWORDS: lancearmstrong

1 posted on 01/18/2013 4:52:25 AM PST by LD Jackson
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To: LD Jackson

“the United States has become a place in which professional athletes and entertainers are mistaken for people of significance.” Robert A. Heinlein


2 posted on 01/18/2013 5:08:31 AM PST by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: LD Jackson

For what it’s worth, my Kaspersky virus program just blocked me from your web site. You might want to run a scan on it to get rid of whatever has invaded it.


3 posted on 01/18/2013 5:11:31 AM PST by RoosterRedux
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To: LD Jackson

“I went and looked up the definition of cheat,” he added a moment later. “And the definition is to gain an advantage on a rival or foe. I didn’t view it that way. I viewed it as a level playing field.”

...and Lance IMHO would be correct. Blood doping was as common in professional bike racing as bicyclists. Doesn’t make it right, but the blame should fall somewhat on the agencies in control, (there is an oxymoron) of the sport.

I’m not wasting my time on what should be done. It is obvious that the sport depends on blood doping and it can be done without being found out, so either allow it, fix it, or go down with the ship.

Lance Armstrong still won against all other blood transfusion arteests so bully for him, and hopefully he can be a part of the solution.


4 posted on 01/18/2013 5:19:27 AM PST by wita
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To: LD Jackson

I have no use for people who are obsessed with winning, regardless of how they win.


5 posted on 01/18/2013 5:21:48 AM PST by I want the USA back
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To: LD Jackson
Thanks for posting the whole thing.

I'm not sure what to say about Lance Armstrong now - all I can say is that I'm of the minority that never bought it. Some of the things he said about his cancer recovery just... weren't right, let's say it that way.

I've never met Adrian Peterson and I really have no more stake in his reputation than you see in my screenname, but here's his rap sheet: Adrian said the wrong thing once, and got in a shoving match with a rentacop once, that no doubt ended up better for the rentacop than it could have.

To see him gratuitously compared to uh, this Armstrong character, who proclaimed that his recovery from cancer was his own doing and that G-d had nothing to do with it... trying to spatter Adrian with the same matter, if you know what I'm saying, that's all over Armstrong right now... that just ain't right...

6 posted on 01/18/2013 5:31:47 AM PST by OKSooner ("The grace of the Lord Jesus be with God's people. Amen." - Revelation 22:21)
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To: Daveinyork
“the United States has become a place in which professional athletes and entertainers are mistaken for people of significance.” Robert A. Heinlein
_________________________________________________

And, to the list I would add politicians. Surely Armstrong has nothing on Zero's lies and Alinsky tactics applied to his critics. The fact is Armstrong would never have admitted the fraud without first being caught. The same is true with Zero. Will Armstrong's lies, bluster, and ultimate disgrace with respect to who he really was register with Zero and his minions? Personal character assassination to perpetrate a lie should be legally actionable by the victims.

7 posted on 01/18/2013 5:35:35 AM PST by iontheball
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To: I want the USA back
IMHO, it's absurd that riding a bigycle is some great accomplishment and worth millions.

Golf is another...Hit a ball with a stick. Get the little ball in the hole and win a million dollars??

In fact....all these sports are nothing more than "money grabbers". They may have started in good faith...but I don't believe it is now the case.

8 posted on 01/18/2013 5:38:29 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Daveinyork
“the United States has become a place in which professional athletes and entertainers are mistaken for people of significance.” Robert A. Heinlein

Might I advance the name of Ray Lewis of the Baltimore Ravens for inclusion in this not-so-elite collection???

9 posted on 01/18/2013 5:40:27 AM PST by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: Daveinyork

He should have added politicians.


10 posted on 01/18/2013 5:47:36 AM PST by CaptainK (...please make it stop. Shake a can of pennies at it.)
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To: wita
...and Lance IMHO would be correct. Blood doping was as common in professional bike racing as bicyclists. Doesn’t make it right, but the blame should fall somewhat on the agencies in control, (there is an oxymoron) of the sport.

And he would not be correct. While an European doping culture existed before Lance arrived, he knowingly took it to a level nobody has seen before and was beyond ruthless about it.
11 posted on 01/18/2013 6:00:21 AM PST by Vision (Obama is king of the "Takers." Don't be a "Taker.")
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To: LD Jackson
Many who reach the pinnacle of their chosen endeavor will have pushed the envelope at some points along the way. In other words many of us humans aren't nearly as pure/clean as the wind driven snow. JMO.
12 posted on 01/18/2013 6:02:22 AM PST by deport
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To: Sacajaweau
Riding a bicycle is not a great accomplishment. Most able bodied people exposed to bicycles in their youth can easily cycle. The same applies to hitting a small ball with a stick towards a hole in the ground, or using another type of stick to hit a puck across ice, or for that matter getting into a vehicle and driving around, on and on, in an endless cycle. Any able bodied person can do that.

However, there are two things that separate most people from those who get paid a lot to do that: (i) most people cannot do it at the same level of ability as those people can; and, (ii) the market is not willing to pay to watch most people do those activities. This means, to use ice hockey and basketball as an example, while most able bodied people, with some training, can learn to play ice hockey or dribble a basketball; they are highly unlikely to be able to play ice hockey like Wayne Gretzky could, or work a basketball in the way Michael Jordan did. That's the relative skill part. The second part is the market pricing part - most people are simply not willing to pay money to watch Joe Six-Pack attempt to dunk a basketball. Advertisers may be willing to pay a lot of money for Jeff Gordon's car to drive around in circles with their name on the hood, and people may be willing to pay a lot for season tickets to watch LeBron play with a ball ...and for that matter people are willing to put their Dollars into work to listen to Rush Limbaugh, but wouldn't pay to listen to a FReeper say the same exact things (and not only would they not pay, they wouldn't listen for free even).

Skill/ability plus market pricing. That's why most people are willing to pay some people to do something that most people can be able to do at a lesser level. Kind of similar to why doctors are paid more than janitors ...anyone can sweep trash, but not everyone can be a doctor, or is willing to put the sacrifice necessary to be one.

With that said, making athletes into heroes is absolute lunacy. They are just people who, either by hard work or genetic luck, are able to play a sport. Nothing more, nothing less. However that doesn't mean they do not deserve what they are paid, primarily for the simple reason that that's what the market has priced them at, and people are more than willing to pay them such amounts.

13 posted on 01/18/2013 6:17:01 AM PST by spetznaz (Nuclear-tipped Ballistic Missiles: The Ultimate Phallic Symbol)
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To: spetznaz

Cycle = circle.


14 posted on 01/18/2013 6:18:18 AM PST by spetznaz (Nuclear-tipped Ballistic Missiles: The Ultimate Phallic Symbol)
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To: LD Jackson
I say a clip this morning where he grinned & snickered when asked if he was a bully.
15 posted on 01/18/2013 6:19:10 AM PST by TexasCajun
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To: iontheball

Politicians do have one significance - they control a lot of weapons.


16 posted on 01/18/2013 6:22:13 AM PST by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: T-Bird45

“Might I advance the name of Ray Lewis of the Baltimore Ravens for inclusion in this not-so-elite collection??? “

Wasn’t he involved in a murder the year that the Ravens last won the superbowl?


17 posted on 01/18/2013 6:23:51 AM PST by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: LD Jackson

He said that he didn’t consider himself a cheater because everyone else was cheating except for those who weren’t cheating.


18 posted on 01/18/2013 6:26:15 AM PST by Uncle Chip
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To: LD Jackson

Everyone doped, his crime was he was an American who kept on winning.


19 posted on 01/18/2013 6:27:42 AM PST by Bobalu (It is not obama we are fighting, it is the media.)
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To: LD Jackson

His 15 minutes are up, he needs to go away.


20 posted on 01/18/2013 6:33:06 AM PST by knife6375 (US Navy Veteran)
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To: LD Jackson; All
As a follow-up, Kaspersky can from time to time be overly cautious. Perhaps that is what happened re: your web site.

Thx for your attention to this matter.

21 posted on 01/18/2013 6:33:49 AM PST by RoosterRedux
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To: Bobalu
If only it was that easy to describe: Lance and his doctor, in a small room somewhere, doping in private.

The fact of the matter is that Armstrong ran an on-going criminal enterprise.

22 posted on 01/18/2013 6:35:16 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: LD Jackson

Armstrong has dishonored humanity with his behavior. We have young men braving booby traps and enemy bullets in Afghanistan and this jerk goes on national television to try and explain away his cheating. Hey Lance, pull a two year tour with the Infantry in Afghanistan and I’ll forgive you for being a greedy cheat.


23 posted on 01/18/2013 6:56:32 AM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: spetznaz

It has been said that the hardest thing to do in sports is to hit a baseball with a wooden bat. Even the best ever, Ted Williams for example, could only do it at best 40% of the time he was at the plate. He was not on steroids either.


24 posted on 01/18/2013 6:56:57 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: iontheball

Once again proving Robert Heinlein was one of the great sages of the past century.

I could care less whether people on FR think professional cycling is a stupid sport or not, some would say shooting a gun at a piece of paper is stupid too. We have freedom (barely) to choose our forms of recreation and make our own decisions about that. What is a shame is that the US Postal Service wasted millions of our dollars sponsoring this guy, and that is just wrong, whether it was Armstrong or NASCAR.

Armstrong has disgraced himself, and proven the thesis of this article, that “royalty” in sports nearly always has clay feet. Or does that never happen in basketball, football (either kind) or shall we add, even golf?


25 posted on 01/18/2013 7:01:57 AM PST by bigbob
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To: OKSooner; LD Jackson; All

What I find truly tedious is how anyone [esp. public figures are ‘heroic’ for ‘beating’ cancer - please. Credit where credit is due first to God, then maybe the medical community although even they belittle the best ‘medicine’ money can buy imho - CHIROPRACTIC- it’s really all about getting the DNA and nervous system messages to function fully and properly.

Nothing against MDs, drugs and surgeries but the first and best method of healing, the straightening or ‘unkinking’ the subluxations in the spine, is truly the best and the way God intended for most healing to occur in our bodies. The famous folks are often just endorsing those with the deepest pockets who ‘rub’ each other backs and ‘grease’ each others palms.

If future developments don’t vindicate my statements, I fully expect to see the real truths in these stories revealed to us in Heaven. Then again Heaven may just be so great that all the memories of this world would just be a passing fading sigh of the ultimate relief.


26 posted on 01/18/2013 7:05:13 AM PST by BrandtMichaels
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To: wita

Lance Armstrong still won against all other blood transfusion arteests so bully for him, and hopefully he can be a part of the solution.

My only real problem with him is that he lied over and over again.


27 posted on 01/18/2013 7:17:06 AM PST by napscoordinator (GOP Candidate 2020 - "Bloomberg 2020 - We vote for whatever crap the GOP puts in front of us.")
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To: LD Jackson

My understanding of Armstrong’s mea culpa is that he’s negotiating for participation in triathlons and marathons.


28 posted on 01/18/2013 7:30:48 AM PST by sarasota
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To: Daveinyork

Excellent.


29 posted on 01/18/2013 8:08:20 AM PST by Conservative4Ever (I'm going Galt)
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To: LD Jackson

Excerpt:

Lance Armstrong confession a convenient truth, says WADA

Reuters, DNA, January 18, 2013

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) was left unimpressed by Lance Armstrong’s doping confessions in a television interview, calling the disgraced cyclist’s confession a convenient truth. Armstrong, already stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, revealed his dark secrets to talk show host Oprah Winfrey on Thursday with more revelations expected to follow on Friday in part two of the interview.

As the sporting world digested Armstrong’s admission that all seven of his Tour victories were fuelled by performance-enhancing drugs, WADA officials were left unmoved by the American’s answers or Winfrey’s questioning. “It seemed to us it was more of a convenient truth than a full display of what went on and that is really what we would ask him to do,” WADA director general David Howman told Reuters on Friday.

“First, it displays that talking to a talk show host is not a very effective way of getting the full information out because a talk show host doesn’t have the full story. “I think there were a lot of words put into his mouth, that’s not the way you get full information. “The tough questions have to be asked at some stage if they are going to be answered there may be some benefit.”

Both WADA and the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), who conducted the exhaustive investigation that resulted in Armstrong’s lifetime ban, have challenged the 41-year-old to come forward and and tell what he knows about the widespread doping in his sport under oath. According to media reports Armstrong is hoping to trade some insider knowledge of doping in cycling for a reduction of his lifetime ban that would allow him to resume competition in athletic events that adhere to the World Anti-Doping Code.

More here:

http://www.dnaindia.com/sport/report_lance-armstrong-confession-a-convenient-truth-says-wada_1790279


30 posted on 01/18/2013 12:19:03 PM PST by Jyotishi (Seeking the truth, a fact at a time.)
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To: LD Jackson

In a more perfect world Okrah would have taped the interview, described it to the press and the public and shelved it, instead of giving the cheater a nationwide platform!


31 posted on 01/18/2013 12:26:35 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
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To: All

hard to find a good youtube interview yet of Lance & Okra. Please post if you find a good one...


32 posted on 01/18/2013 1:24:12 PM PST by CharlotteVRWC
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To: All

hard to find a good youtube interview yet of Lance & Okra. Please post if you find a good one...


33 posted on 01/18/2013 1:24:30 PM PST by CharlotteVRWC
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To: Bobalu

No, his crime was character assassination and lawsuits against people who indicated he’d doped. Friends, colleagues, their spouses. At one point in the interview when discussing the horrible things he’d said about a colleague’s wife he jokes that at least he never called her fat. THAT’S the crime will keep him sunk.


34 posted on 01/18/2013 1:31:22 PM PST by discostu (I recommend a fifth of Jack and a bottle of Prozac)
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To: Jyotishi

“Both WADA and the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), who conducted the exhaustive investigation that resulted in Armstrong’s lifetime ban, have challenged the 41-year-old to come forward and and tell what he knows about the widespread doping in his sport under oath”

Just astounding, both these agencies still denying culpability, and knowledge, and wanting Mr Armstrong to be the sacrificial lamb and testify under oath so their banning can be seen as having teeth, since most if not all of the testimony against him is hearsay. If they ever get off their focus on Lance Armstrong they might just have a chance at reviving their credibility. In the mean time I save lots of time not watching Le Tour.


35 posted on 01/19/2013 4:34:49 AM PST by wita
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